Tag Archives: Latin jazz

Eddie Palmieri’s Loving Tribute to Iraida Palmieri

Eddie Palmieri – Mi Luz Mayor (Uprising Music/Ropeadope, 2018)

Mi Luz Mayor (My Greater Light) is dedicated to Iraida, Eddie Palmieri’s late wife, who was the love of his life. The legendary Latin jazz pianist, composer, arranger and band leader selected the music that Palmieri and his wife relished in their youth. The album features musical pieces by various composers and originals by Palmieri.

“Because this music is in her honor, everything from start to finish had to be of the highest caliber and I am proud to say that it is just that,” says Palmieri about Mi Luz Mayor.

Although Eddie Palmieri is well-known as a Latin jazz composer and performer, his music incorporates a rich variety of influences on salsa, Colombian music, Afro-Latin music, Colombian cumbia, rock, Puerto Rican rural music, mambo and romantic boleros.

The list of musicians who participated in Mi Luz Mayor is impressive. In addition to his regular band, Eddie Palmieri invited some of the finest musicians and vocalists in the Latin jazz and salsa scene, hailing from the US, Puerto Rico and Cuba.

Three special guests appear on Mi Luz Mayor, Puerto Rican salsa and bolero star Gilberto Santa Rosa on vocals; famed Puerto Rican-American salsa singer Hermán Olivera; and the fabulous Carlos Santana on electric guitar, injecting a remarkable solo on Mr. Congo, which makes this piece sound like top of the line Cuban timba.

Eddie Palmieri

The lineup on Mi Luz Mayor includes Eddie Palmieri on piano; Luques Curtis on bass; Karl Perazzo on timbales; Camilo Molina on timbales, drums and itótele; Pequeño Johnny Rivero on congas; Anthony Carrillo on bongos, cowbell and iyá; Nelson González on tres; Gabriel Lugo on okónkolo; Jerry Medina on backing vocals ; Juan Pablo Díaz on backing vocals; Brian Lynch on trumpet; Jonathan Powell on trumpet; John Walsh on trumpet; Pete Nater on trumpet; Chris Rogers on trumpet; Conrad Herwig on trombone; Jimmy Bosch on trombone; Joe Fiedler on trombone; Chris Washburne on trombone; Doug Beavers on trombone; Tokinori Kajiwara on trombone; Louis Fouché on alto saxophone; Yosvany Terry on alto saxophone; Ralph Moore on alto saxophone; Ivan Renta on tenor saxophone; Craig Handy on tenor saxophone; Jeremy Powell on tenor saxophone; Gary Smulyan on baritone saxophone; and Ronnie Cuber on baritone saxophone.

Special guests: Giberto Santa Rosa on lead and backing vocals; Carlos Santana on electric guitar; and Hermán Olivera on lead vocals.

Mi Luz Mayor features exceptionally good, timelessly crafted Latin big band songs by one of the brightest Latin Jazz artists of our time.

Buy the Mi Luz Mayor CD and download in Europe

Buy Mi Luz Mayor digital download in North America

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French Horn Exotica

Ken Wiley – Cuerno Exotica (Krug Park Music, 2018)

French horn virtuoso Ken Wiley showcases the versatility of the French on Cuerno Exotica (cuerno means horn in Spanish).

Cuerno Exotica presents original pieces inspired by jazz, mambo, Cuban, Spanish and Brazilian music as well as a re-imagined Latin jazz version of Ravel’s famed bolero and classics by Cal Tjader and McCoy Tyner.

Ken Wiley’s extraordinary French horn is joined by acoustic guitarist Mark Leggett and flutist Dan Higgins together with a superb rhythm section rhythm featuring bassist Rene Camacho, drummer Bernie Dresel, and Luis Conte and Kevin Ricard on Latin percussion.

Other guests include the Bolero Horns (Gary Grant, Larry Hall, Steve Holtman, Dan Higgins) and Dave Loeb on piano.

Cuerno Exotica is a deeply satisfying, updated 21st century version of the classic exotica albums of the 1960s, highlighting the sound of the French horn.

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Una Noche Con Rubén Blades, An Exquisitely-Crafted Mix of Salsa and Jazz Swing

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis featuring Rubén Blades – Una Noche Con Rubén Blades (Blue Engine Records, 2018)

Salsa and jazz swing come together in a superb collaboration between the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and salsa star Rubén Blades, plus additional musicians on Afro-Cuban percussion and backing vocals.

Rubén Blades demonstrates why he’s been one of the top salsa singers for years. Not surprisingly, he also shows great talent as a jazz crooner. The repertoire on the album combines various Rubén Blades salsa hits such as “Pedro Navaja,” “Patria,” and “El Cantante,”along with jazz standards like “Too Close for Comfort” and “Begin the Beguine.”

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra in this occasion was led by bassist Carlos Henriquez, one of the rising stars of Latin jazz. He grew up listening to Rubén Blades. “His albums, and the sound and the warmth they generated, filled my family’s apartment at 146th and Brook Avenue in the Bronx, and his music was one of my earliest influences.”

Although Rubén Blades stands out throughout the album, the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra’s musicians contribute remarkable solos on trumpet, trombone, flute, piano and percussion.

The musicians on the album include:

Reeds: Sherman Irby on alto saxophone and soprano saxophones; Ted Nash on alto saxophone, flute, piccolo; Victor Goines on tenor and soprano saxophones, clarinet; Walter Blanding on tenor saxophone; and Paul Nedzela on baritone saxophone.

Trumpets: Ryan Kisor, Kenny Rampton, Marcus Printup, and Wynton Marsalis.

Trombones: Vincent Gardner, Chris Crenshaw and Elliot Mason.

Rhythm Section: Dan Nimmer on piano; Carlos Henriquez on bass; and Ali Jackson on drums.

Lead vocals and maracas: Rubén Blades.

Special Guests: Eddie Rosado on backing vocals; Bobby Allende on congas, backing vocals; Marc Quiñones on timbales, backing vocals; Carlos Padron on bongos, cowbell; and Seneca Black on trumpet.

Buy Una Noche Con Rubén Blades

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Artist Profiles: Arturo O’Farrill

Arturo O’Farrill

Arturo O’Farrill, born June 22, 1960 in Mexico City, is the son of renowned Cuban composer Chico O’Farrill (whose works have been recorded by Benny Goodman, Stan Kenton, Dizzy Gillespie, the Machito Orchestra, and Mario Bauza).

Arturo pursued studies at the Manhattan School of Music and the Brooklyn College Conservatory, and played in the award-winning jazz band at New York’s High School of Music and Art with future luminaries Marcus Miller and Omar Hakim. He then went on to develop as a solo performer and an ensemble member on recordings and performances with a spectrum of artists: Wynton Marsalis, Dizzy Gillespie, Steve Turre, Noel Pointer, Jerry Gonzalez and the Fort Apache Band. In 1987 he became musical director for Harry Belafonte. He currently directs the Chico O’Farrill’s Afro-Cuban Jazz Big Band.

Arturo O’Farrill leads the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra. the ensemble exemplifies the best that Latin jazz culture offers: rich tradition through music and timeless appeal around the world. Latin jazz is a general term given to music that combines rhythms from African and Latin American countries with jazz harmonies from the United States. Afro-Cuban Latin jazz includes salsa, merengue, songo, son, mambo, bolero, charanga and cha cha cha. Originated in the 1940s, Dizzy Gillespie and Stan Kenton began to combine the rhythm section and structure of Afro-Cuban music. Latin jazz employs straight rhythm, not swung rhythm and the conga, timbale, guiro and claves are used in this unique music.

O’Farrill also directs the band that preserves much of his father’s music, the Chico O’Farrill Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra. He has performed with Dizzy Gillespie, Fort Apache Band, Carla Bley, Lester Bowie, Harry Belafonte, Freddy Cole and Wynton Marsalis. The Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra became a resident orchestra at Jazz at Lincoln Center in 2002 and has toured internationally, bringing the rhythms and heat of Latin jazz to places as far away as China. Performing the very best of traditional compositions in the canon of the Afro-Latin genre, the large ensemble commissions new work and leads education events when on the road and at Frederick P. Rose Hall. Ultimately, it seeks to provide an opportunity for a new generation of composers, arrangers and instrumentalists to further explore and define the music.

Discography:

Blood Lines (Milestone, 1999)
A Night in Tunisia (32 Jazz, 2000)
Cumana (Pony Canyon, 2004)
Live in Brooklyn (Zoho, 2005)
Una Noche Inolvidable (Palmetto, 2005)
Song for Chico (Zoho, 2008)
Risa Negra (Zoho, 2009)
40 Acres and a Burro (Zoho, 2011)
The Noguchi Sessions (Zoho, 2012)
Final Night at Birdland (Zoho, 2013)
The Offense of the Drum (Motéma, 2014)
Cuba: The Conversation Continues (Motéma, 2015)

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Artist Profiles: Sergio Lara

Sergio Lara

For over 20 years, guitarist Sergio Lara has been respected in acoustic contemporary instrumental music. His last recording with Lara & Reyes, World Jazz, received a “Latin Grammy Award” nomination for “Best Instrumental Pop Album” in 2001.

Perhaps better known as the founder and leader of the Latin guitar duo Lara & Reyes, Sergio has explored a great variety of styles that show his eclectic taste. During his collaboration with Lara & Reyes, which included 6 albums recorded for the Higher Octave Music label, they adapted musical traditions from all over the world, with rhythms from Africa and the Caribbean, chord structures from Mexico and Spain, and melodic scales from the Middle East and India, but always with an original stamp, that is basically the Latin guitar within the spirit of improvisation.

Sergio has played different styles, including Jazz, Bluegrass and Flamenco as well as several fusion forms. His music belongs to what is known as Latin Jazz and Flamenco Jazz.

Sergio Lara appears in the international music scene in 1983 with the release of his first solo album entitled Sergiology. In this album he explores various styles influenced by Jazz and Bluegrass. During the following years he participated and collaborated with various artists in Mexico and also with his own band the “New Acoustic Unit” in Nashville, Tennessee, and San Antonio, Texas, and in 1994 released the album Guitarras Hermanas, the first one for Higher Octave Music. This album of all original music, also included a new instrumental version of the very popular and romantic song “Sabor a Mi”.

Sergio Lara was born in Mexico City. He started playing guitar at age nine and very early he discovered and began studying several musical styles. His greatest influences have been the great English Jazz guitarist, John McLaughlin; Costa Rican guitar master, Jorge Strunz; Flamenco Spanish genius, Paco de Lucia; Bluegrass and Jazz guitarist, Tony Rice, the great guitarist Norman Blake, and eclectic mandolin players Sam Bush and David Grisman, among others.

In 1996, Sergio released his next production entitled Two Guitars-One Passion, which received worldwide attention because of its original combination of different musical styles. This album included an instrumental version of the well-known Mexican classic “La Bikina,” which is still very popular on many Jazz radio programs around the world.

His next project was in 1997 with the album Exotico, which incorporated different instruments for the first time, like the piano, flute, sax and violin, making a new mixture of sounds with his guitar. With mostly original compositions this album also includes new instrumental versions of the classic “Mi Ciudad” and the standard “Brazil”.

In 1998, with the album Riverwalk, he gave a twist in regard to his compositions creating new rhythms and melodies. This record includes a medley of 2 wonderful romantic Latin songs, “Solamente una Vez” and “Amor, Amor, Amor,” and in the year 2000, in celebration of the millennium he released Navidad, on which he enters fully into the music of the Christmas season, playing new instrumental versions of 18 standard songs, incorporating the mandolin with the guitar.

In 2004, Sergio Lara immersed himself in several new productions. He recorded 2 new albums for his independent label Fusion Acustica Music.” The first one, a CD of new original instrumental music entitled Con la Lluvia, which includes a new version of the haunting traditional song “La Llorona.” The second project is a collection of traditional folk songs from Mexico and the United States, entitled Entre Guitarras y Mandolinas, performed by Sergio playing all the guitars, mandolin and 5 string banjo. In addition, this album also includes vintage recordings, rescued from Sergio’s personal archives, of traditional Mexican songs performed in a bluegrass style by Sergio playing the mandolin and guitar, joined by members of the Tennessee Valley Authority, a well known and respected bluegrass band from San Antonio, Texas.

With a career that covers many years and more than ten albums under his name, Sergio Lara has appeared in several concerts and participated in important festivals.

Discography

Guitarras Hermanas (1995)
Two Guitars One Passion (Talking Taco Records, 1992)
Exotico (Higher Octave Music, 1996)
Riverwalk ‎(Higher Octave Music, 1998)
Navidad (Higher Octave Music, 2000)
World Jazz (Higher Octave Music, 2000)
Con La Lluvia (Fusion Acustica, 2004)

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Acclaimed Latin Jazz Trumpeter and Percussionist Jerry Gonzalez Dead at 69

Today, the Latin Jazz community is mourning the loss of trumpeter and conguero Jerry Gonzalez. Reports of a fire at his home in the Lavapiés district of Madrid summoned Spain’s National Police and paramedics where they discovered the musician. He was rushed to San Carlos Clinical Hospital where he died hours later. Mr. Gonzalez was 69.

Mr. Gonzalez was born into New York City’s Puerto Rican community on June 5, 1949. The rich world of music was already a staple in the Gonzalez house with Jerry Gonzalez, Sr. serving as a master of ceremonies and a lead singer along with musicians like Claudio Ferrer. His brother and bassist Andy Gonzalez would go on to follow his own musical career, often playing with his brother.

Taking up the trumpet and congas in junior high school, Mr. Gonzalez launched his musical career playing with local bands. After attending the New York College of Music and New York University, Mr. Gonzalez started playing with Lewellyn Matthews and in the 1970s played congas with Dizzy Gillespie and began merging African rhythms into jazz themes. He was a stalwart proponent of Latin music and an indefatigable explorer of the possibilities of Latin Jazz.

Mr. Gonzalez would go on to play with the likes of Jaco Pastorius, Tito Puente, Manny Oquendo and Eddie Palmieri. He found his groove by heading up The Fort Apache Band. Recordings like Ya Yo Me Cure, The River is Deep, Obatala, Pensativo, Calle 54, Rumba Buhaina and Jerry Gonzalez y El Comando de La Clave would soon stack up alongside appearances on Kip Hanrahan’s Coup de Tete, Tito Puente’s On Broadway, Carlos “Patato” Valdes’s Masterpiece, Steve Turre’s Viewpoints on Vibrations, Kirk Lightsey’s Kenny Kirkland, Bobby Hutcherson’s Acoustic Master II and Sonny Fortune’s A Better Understanding.

Jerry Gonzalez

Settling in Spain and lending his talents to flamenco, Mr. Gonzalez appeared with Diego “El Cigala” on Corren Tiempos de Alegria and Picasso en Mis Ojos and Paco de Lucia on Cositas Buenas, as well as collaborated with Javier Limon on La Tierra del Agua and Son de Limon and Andres Calamaro on Obras Incompletas and On the Rock.

Mr. Gonzalez earned film credits as well in Leon Ichaso’ s Crossover, Fernando Trueba’s Calle 54 and Leon Ichaso’s Pinero. In addition to The Fort Apache Band, Mr. Gonzalez also led the quartet El Comando de la Clave with Miguel Blanco.

The General Society of Authors of Spain (SGAE) issued a tweet mourning Mr. Gonzalez’s loss by calling him, “one of the pioneers of Latin Jazz and founder of the legendary group Fort Apache Band.”
No announcement has been made yet on funeral or memorial services

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Puerto Rican Hipness in West Side Story Reimagined

Bobby Sanabria – West Side Story Reimagined (Jazzheads, 2018)

Drummer, musical director and arranger Bobby Sanabria and the Multiverse Big Band have recreated the music originally composed for a popular Broadway musical theater play called West Side Story. The piece, inspired by Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, focused on the love story between members of two New York Gangs, one of which is Puerto Rican.

Although Bobby Sanabria was born in the USA, he grew up in a proud Puerto Rican family. Sanabria skillfully has inserted Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican and even Brazilian rhythmic elements like cha cha cha, mambo, bomba and more into the original score by Leonard Bernstein. What was originally a classic Broadway score, now features irresistible Latin jazz beats and full big band richness.

The musicians that appear in the album include Bobby Sanabria on musical director, drum set with cowbells, police whistle, samba whistle and lead vocals; Kevin Bryan, Shareef Clayton, Max Darché and Andrew Neesley on trumpet; David De Jesús on lead alto and soprano saxophones and flute; Andrew Gould on alto saxophone and flute; Peter Brainin on tenor saxophone and flute; Yaacov Mayman on tenor saxophone, flute and clarinet; Danny Rivera on baritone saxophone; David Miller, Tim Sessions, Armando Vergara on trombone; Chris Washburne on bass trombone; Gabrielle Garo on flute and piccolo; Ben Sutin on electric violin; Darwin Noguera on piano; Leo Traversa on electric bass; Oreste Abrantes on congas, itotele batá drum and second voice; Matthew González on bongo, cencerro, primo bomba drum, Iyá batá, requinto pandereta, ganza and Dominican güira; Takeo Heisho on claves, Cuban güiro macho, cencerro, Puerto Rican guicharo, okonkolo batá drum, Cuban and Venezuelan maracas, chékere, tambourine, cuica, pandeiro, triangle, gong and police siren.

The double album West Side Story Reimagined is a masterful Latin jazz work by Bobby Sanabria, one of the great Latin music drummers of our time, and the exceptionally good Multiverse Big Band.

Buy West Side Story Reimagined from amazon.com

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Les Moncada Chats with Master Conguero and Batalero Tony Rosa

There are drummers, then there are drummers. Some go out of their way for exceptional things to happen to them. Tony Rosa, master conguero and master batá drummer, resided in the City of Los Angeles, California. He played batá for the Orisha community for 7 years with conga batá master, legend of legends, Francisco Aguabella, from Matanzas, Cuba.

Francisco was a very stern group leader; whether it was his Latin Jazz Orchestra or Folkloric group and his religious batá ceremonies. Francisco either liked you or he didn’t like you. It was always beneficial to be on his good side. Francisco had three Afro-Cuban folkloric groups in California: one in San Francisco, another one in Los Angeles, and a third in Sacramento. Sometimes I say ‘Masters’ are so good, that they actually are not teachers.

Francisco Aguabella’s apprentices have reached legend status and Tony Rosa is one of them. Tony Rosa performed with Francisco Aguabella’s Afro Cuban folkloric group in Los Angeles, along with batá master Virgilio Figueroa and Francisco Aguabella.

 

Virgilio Figueroa, Francisco Aguabella & Tony Rosa

 

Virgilio Figueroa, also from Matanzas, Cuba, made a remark in one article I wrote for World Music Central, where Virgilio contributed on a tribute to Francisco Aguabella. He said that Francisco showed his apprentices Afro Cuban rhythms that are no longer played in Matanzas today!

Tony Rosa took the big step and moved to New York City. Being an accomplished conga drummer, he linked with great all time master timbalero Manny Oquendo and Conjunto Libre, with co-leader bass legend Andy Gonzalez, brother of legendary conguero and trumpet player Jerry Gonzalez. Tony also performed and recorded with the legendary group Conjunto Folklórico Nuevoriqueño Experimental and recently won a Grammy performing and recording with Arturo O’Farrill.

Let see what Tony has to say about his life and career.

 

Tony Rosa, Jerry (Gerald) Gonzalez & Gene Golden

 

Tony, tell me your background, or family background in Latin music and drumming.

I am Puerto Rican, born in New York City, raised in Los Angeles, California. My father is from Mayagüez, Puerto Rico and my mother from Loiza, Puerto Rico. My influence comes from my mother, being a priestess of Elegua and taking me to all the African dance classes and “tambores” (religious drum ceremonies) as a kid.

How did you meet conga bata master Francisco Aguabella? Tell us some of your history with Francisco Aguabella.

I met Francisco Aguabella in Los Angeles in the 1980s. Francisco was very serious when it came to Cuban drumming (batá, yesa, etc…) He was very selective with who he would share and teach Matanzas-style drumming with.

So how was it that it occurred for you to go to New York City from Los Angeles?

I went to perform in New York with El Chicano. While there, I hung out, checking out other Latin bands. The music vibe in New York was intense at that time. Salsa was booming. I felt like I wasn’t growing musically in Los Angeles so I decided to move to New York in 1996.

 

Tony Rosa – Photo by Kirk Richard Smith

 

You performed with Manny Oquendo and Conjunto Libre. What was your experience with that orchestra?

I started with Manny Oquendo y Conjunto Libre in 2000. Never ever did I think I would be with Libre steady. Manny was very picky when it came to conga players. That’s how I got respect from others; plenty wanted “that chair”. Laughs out loud.

 

 

What other bands have you played with in New York?

In New York I have performed and shared the stage with artist like Nelson Gonzales (legendary tres player), Miles Peña, Chocolate’s group Grupo Foklórico Nuevayorkino Experimental, DLG, Orlando “Puntilla” Rios, Bebo Valdés, MalPaso Dance Co. from Havana Cuba, Lou Soloff, among other artists.

What do you think is the difference in musicianship Los Angeles, vs. New York City?

There are great musicians and drummers everywhere, I think it’s all about attitude. New York musicians are aggressive, where Los Angeles musicians are more laid back. My opinion!

 

Tony Rosa

 

You won a Grammy. Tell us a little about that situation?

Winning a Grammy was very exciting and awesome. My first Grammy was with Cachao Master Sessions in Los Angeles 1994. I didn’t find out till later on. Conguero Richie Flores informed me. I am so proud to say I am a 4 times Grammy Award Winner, feeling blessed. The other 3 Grammys were with Arturo O’Farrill and The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra.

What are you doing now musically in New York?

I currently have a 9-5 and traveling and still playing drums.

 

Tony Rosa & John Rodriguez

 

What does the future bring for Tony Rosa, master conguero and batalero, the musician?

I am currently working on my own project CD, recording. Latin Jazz with Afro Cuban and Puerto Rican rhythms. Lots of drums…

 

 

Thank you, Tony Rosa for your interview. Now that I have up and coming musicians that have been in the circuit for a while, the next few interviews that I will be doing is with the middle generation of musicians, to expose their contributions to the Latin music community. Those musicians are Latin percussionist, orchestra leader and Puerto Rican Folkloric Director, California-based Jeri Quiñones from Vieques, Puerto Rico and legendary Latin bassist Lalo Vazquez from northern California, residing in Mexico City. There will also be other specialty interviews to surprise the readers as well.

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Artist Profiles: Michel Camilo

Michel Camilo

Michel Camilo was born into a musical family and played accordion before switching to piano at the age of nine. In 1979, he arrived to New York, where the self-taught student of American jazz, continued his studies and made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1985. After three years as a member of Paquito D’Rivera’s band, in 1988, Camilo released his self-titled Epic debut. The album became an instant success and held the top jazz album spot for eight consecutive weeks. His next recording, On Fire, was voted one of the top three Jazz Albums of the Year by Billboard and 1990s On the Other Hand was a top-ten jazz album.

In 2000, Camilo’s Verve release, Spain, with Spanish flamenco guitar maestro Tomatito, won Best Latin Jazz Album in the first-ever Latin Grammy Awards. Camilo also appeared on the soundtrack CD for the acclaimed Latin jazz film Calle 54, directed by the Oscar-winning Spaniard Fernando Trueba.

2002 marked a special year for the ever-versatile Camilo with the release of two albums, one classical and one Jazz. In February, Decca released his Concerto for Piano & Orchestra, Suite for Piano, Strings and Harp & Caribe, to celebrate his guest appearance with the NSO conducted by Leonard Slatkin at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., and in March Telarc released Triangulo.

August 2003 marked the Telarc release of Live at the Blue Note, featuring Horacio “El Negro” Hernandez on drums and Charles Flores on acoustic bass. This two-CD set captures the quintessential Camilo “sound” live for the first time. Camilo called upon drummer Horacio ‘El Negro’ Hernandez to bring his rich Cuban roots and spirit, which he expresses unlike any other drummer. The 1997 Grammy Award winner performed and recorded with legends such as McCoy Tyner, Carlos Santana, and as a member of renowned Latin ensembles like Tito Puente’s Tropi-Jazz All Stars, El Negro has earned a renowned reputation as one of the most powerful and versatile players in the current musical scene.

Bassist Charles Flores played and inspired the best, while continuing to challenge himself and his peers in new artistic directions. A graduate of Cuba’s prestigious Escuela Nacional de Arte, Flores has performed and recorded with Juan Pablo Torres, Steve Turre, Jane Bunnett and the BBC Orchestra in London masters. While in Cuba, Charles was recruited by one of the most important figures in the history of Cuban jazz, pianist Emiliano Salvador. In addition, Flores was also the bassist for the groundbreaking Cuban fusion group AfroCuba and for Salsa sensation Isaac Delgado.

Discography:

French Toast (Electric Bird, 1984)
Why Not? (Electric Bird, 1985)
Suntan/In Trio (Electric Bird, 1986)
Michel Camilo (CBS Portrait, 1988)
On Fire (Portrait, 1989)
On the Other Hand (Epic, 1990)
Amo Tu Cama Rica (1991?)
Rendezvous (Columbia, 1993)
One More Once (Columbia, 1994)
Two Much (1996)
Thru My Eyes (Columbia, 1997)
Spain (Verve, 1999)
Piano Concerto, Suite & Caribe (Decca, 2001)
Triangulo (Telarc, 2002)
Live at the Blue Note (Telarc, 2003)
Solo (Telarc, 2004)
Rhapsody in Blue (Telarc, 2006)
Spain Again (Emarcy, 2006)
Spirit of the Moment (Telarc, 2006)
Mano a Mano (Emarcy, 2011)
What’s Up? (Okeh, 2013)
Live in London (Redondo Music, 2015)
Spain Forever (Universal, 2016)

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Ensemble Novo Lured by Brazil

Ensemble Novo – Who Saw You Then, Who Sees You Now

Ensemble Novo – Who Saw You Then, Who Sees You Now (Frosty Cordial Music, 2017)

Who Saw You Then, Who Sees You Now is a 7-track by Ensemble Novo, an American ensemble led by saxophonist and flute player Tom Moon.

The album highlights Moon’s smoky saxophone and the intersections between jazz and Brazilian bossa nova and samba. Who Saw You Then, Who Sees You Now features remarkable interplay between the saxophone, vibraphone, bass and guitar.

Buy Who Saw You Then, Who Sees You Now

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