Tag Archives: Brazil

Artist Profiles: Hermeto Pascoal

Hermeto Pascoal

Hermeto Pascoal is a prominent Brazilian composer and multi-instrumentalist. His compositions appear on albums by Miles Davis and other jazz heavyweights.

He was born in 1936 in Lagoa da Canoa, a small town in northeastern Brazil. His reputation in Brazil is the result of a varied career. As a juvenile he learned to play the flute, appearing on a multitude of occasions. When his family moved to Recife in 1950 he spent the following six years as an accordion player for radio stations, ending as the director of a complete orchestra. Pascoal then moved on to Rio, stunned by the possibilities and musical opportunities arising for him.

In 1964 he joined Aito Moreira in a group called Trio Sambraza. Two years later, again with Airto, a first record was released in Brazil with the Quarteto Novo. When in 1969 the group broke up and Airto Moreira left for the States to play with Miles Davis, Hermeto stayed behind.

Pascoals’ international career began two years later. Airto called him to arrange his productions in New York. Miles Davis, who was fascinated by the wilfulness of Brazilian and especially Pascoal’s music gave him room for two compositions of his own on the album Live Evil. In the same year, 1972, Hermeto Pascoal’s first album, together with Flora Purim, Airto Moreira and Ron Carter was released; called Hermeto.

In 1964 he joined Aito Moreira in a group called Trio Sambraza. Two years later, again with Airto, a first record was released in Brazil with the Quarteto Novo. When in 1969 the group broke up and Airto Moreira left for the States to play with Miles Davis, Hermeto stayed behind. Pascoals’ international career began two years later. Airto called him to arrange his productions in New York. Miles Davis, who was fascinated by the wilfulness of Brazilian and especially Pascoal?s music gave him room fo two compositions of his own on the album Live Evil. In the same year 1972, Hermeto Pascoal?s first album, together with Flora Purim, Airto Moreira and Ron Carter was released; called Hermeto.

Due to the recognition Pascoal received in the United States, the Brazilian record industry’s interest grew rapidly. In 1973 he released an album called A Musica Livre De Hermeto Pascoal. It was due to his innovative power, his restlessness, his search for unconventional musical instruments: bottles, stones, water splashing, and almost everything else that could create sounds; that people started calling him “Bruxo”, the wizard.

His masterpiece, a milestone in the Brazilian music world, was the album Slaves Mass, released 1977. Many other releases followed after this breakthrough.

Hermeto Pascoal

His influence on Brazilian music extends well beyond his own remarkable output as a writer an multi-instrumentalist. As the father-figure for avant-garde Brazilian Jazz, Pascoal’s pioneering music has prepped a generation of musicians who are now having a great deal to say about the direction of the American music scene.

Airto, had this to say about his mentor: “He is the most complete musician I ever met in my life. I consider him almost a genius.

Pascoal plays flutes, keyboards, guitar and bass with equal facility; and reads, writes and arranges without the benefit of any formal training.

Discography:

Conjunto Som 4, with Conjunto Som 4 (1961)
Em Som Maior, with Sambrasa Trio (1966)
Quarteto Novo, with Quarteto Novo (1967)
Brazilian Octopus, with Brazilian Octopus (1969)
Hermeto Pascoal, reissued on CD as Brazilian Adventure (1970)
A música livre de Hermeto Pascoal (Sinter, 1973)
Slaves Mass (Warner Bros. Records, 1976)
Trindade (1977)
Zabumbê-bum-á (Warner Bros. Records, 1979)
Ao vivo Montreux Jazz Festival (Atlantic, 1979)
Nova história da Música Popular Brasileira, compilation (1979)
Cérebro magnético (Atlantic, 1980)
Hermeto Pascoal & Grupo (1982)
Lagoa da Canoa, Município de Arapiraca (Happy Hour Music, 1984)
Brasil Universo (1986)
Só não toca quem não quer (Intuition, 1987)
Hermeto solo) por diferentes caminhos (Som Da Gente, 1988)
Festa dos deuses (1992)
Instrumental no CCBB, with Renato Borghetti (Tom Brasil, 1993)
Música! o melhor da música de Hermeto Pascoal, compilation (1998)
Eu e eles (Rádio Mec, 1999)
Mundo verde esperança (2002)
Chimarrão com rapadura, with Aline Morena (2006)
Bodas de Latão, with Aline Morena (2010)
The Monash Sessions (Jazzhead, 2013)
No Mundo dos Sons (SESC SP, 2017)
Viajando com o som (Far Out Recordings, 2017)
Natureza Universal (2017)
Palmares Fantasy (Far Out Recordings, 2018)
E Sua Visão Original Do Forró ‎(Scubidu Music, 2018)

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Artist Profiles: André Abujamra

André Abujamra

André Cibelli Abujamra was born May 15, 1965 in Sao Paulo. Boldness has always been part of André Abujamra’s more than forty-year career. He has experimented with many musical genres. He is a Brazilian score composer, musician, singer, guitarist, actor, and comedian of Lebanese and Italian origin.

André has worked on nearly 30 films, and has composed the soundtracks to acclaimed Brazilian films such as Durval Discos (2002), Carandiru (2003), and Cafundó (2005). He has also had several minor roles in Brazilian films and has written soundtracks for Brazilian TV.

He was singer and guitar player for the band Karnak who released three albums: Karnak (1995), Universo Umbigo (1997), and Estamos Adorando Tokio (2000).

Together with Maurício Pereira, André is also part of the experimental rock duo Os Mulheres Negras. He also finds time for his experimental projects Fat Marley, Gork and Okê Arô. His solo projects include O Infinito de Pé (2004), Mafaro (2010), O Homem Bruxa (2015).

His album Omindá – A União das Almas do Mundo Pelas Águas (The Union of Souls of the World by the Waters), is the fruit of eleven years of research, travels and friendships. He follows the same innovative way of his previous works, where he mixes film, music, theater and technology.

Omindá in Yoruba is the junction of the words Omin (water) and Da (soul). The meaning signals the goal of the project: to be a great celebration of diversity and communion for art, an artistic encounter with these artists from various parts of the world, living with various cultures, traditions, and music and drawing connections between Brazil and abroad.

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André Abujamra – Omindá

The list of artists who make Omindá one of the most interesting projects conceived by a Brazilian artist in the last decade is vast, over 65 minutes (and 15 videos), composed by André and with partners like Xis, Theo Werneck, Oki Dub, Mauricio Pereira, besides Mintcho Garramone, Anelis Assumpção and Martim Buscaglia, among others.

The international lineup includes The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, The Mystery of the Bulgarian Voices, Zaza Fournier (France), Ballaké Sissoko (Mali), Maria de Medeiros (Portugal), Sasha Vista (Russia), Oki Kano (Japan), Julia Ortiz and Dolores Aguirre (Argentina), Rishab Prasanna and Sharat Srivastava (India), as well as Marcos Suzano, Ricardo Vignini, Trupe Chá de Boldo, Ritchie and Paulinho Moska. “I’ve been meeting these wonderful people along the way,” says André.

André was inspired by the theme of water – this commodity that abounds and is missing. With a multicultural orchestra, a red turban, a necklace with the mystic symbol of the design (used by all participants) and always a guitar on the shoulder, André Abujamra unites the improbable in a fascinating mashup.

In these technological times where borders become non-existent, but mental barriers still prevent us from living in unity, I seeks inspiration in the waters, which know no boundaries,” says André.

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Artist Profiles: Adriano Adewale

Adriano Adewale

Brazilian percussionist and composer Adriano Adewale was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil. For many years he was known as Adriano Pinto, a colonial name he received at birth. After his visit to Africa (Nigeria and the Benin Republic), searching for his roots, he changed his name to Adriano Adewale Itauna, respectively from the Yoruba-Nigeria and Tupi Guarani-Brazil. Adewale means royal child who come back home and Itauna means black rock.

Music has always been part of Adriano’s life. His father, an aficionado percussionist, used to play drums during carnival, and drumming was also a big feature of family gatherings. Adriano’s maternal grandfather used to play clarinet, his uncle accordion and every weekend they would meet and play ‘Chorinho music’, a style also known as Brazilian Jazz.

Two uncles played a great influence on Adriano’s career; Claudio Silva, who was a virtuoso ‘pandeiro’ player, and Joao Nicanor, a singer-songwriter, guitarist and actor.

While working as an actor, Adriano took piano and percussion lessons, followed by a degree/BA in classical music-percussion at the University of Sao Paulo State. In April 2000, Adriano moved to the UK, quickly establishing himself as a respected percussionist, composer, educator and band leader.

In 2002, Adriano was introduced to Italian guitarist Antonio Forcione and soon became part of the Antonio Forcione Quartet.

 In 2004, Adriano went to Africa (Nigeria-Benin) in search for his roots and also to study music with great master percussion players. The trip deeply changed Adriano’s playing and understanding of his own culture in many aspects.

Upon his return, he went on to study further, this time a Masters course in Music/Performance at SOAS – School of Oriental and African Studies in London. His first UK band, Sambura, released the album: Cru in 2006.

In 2008, Adriano released his first solo album, the critically acclaimed Sementes (Segue records) produced by Gilad Atmov. It featured the ‘Adriano Adewale Group’, an international line up of musicians, including Australian born double bass player Nathan Riki Thomson, Senegalese Kora player Kadially Kouyate and Brazilian flutist and saxophonist Marcelo Andrade.

In 2012, he released The Vortex Sessions, a collaboration with the leading Brazilian piano player Benjamin Taubkin. This was followed by Raizes (Caboclos Records) in 2014, his second solo album with the ‘Adriano Adewale Group’, produced by Chris Kimsin (Rolling Stones, Jimmy Cliff).

Adewale is also the mentor behind Catapluf’s Musical Journey, a concert that introduces young audiences to Jazz, commissioned by the EFG London Jazz Festival. With one CD released,  Catapluf’s Musical Journey has toured many parts of Europe including Norway, Sweden, France and Scotland.

Adriano’s characteristic sounds come from organic materials, connected to nature. They are made out of wood, clay, metal, skins and the philosophy behind it is the connection with the four classic elements: water, earth, air and fire. Playing percussion is about making music.

Over the years, Adriano has worked as a curator and artistic director. From 2009-2010 Adriano was an artist in residence at the Lakeside Theatre, Colchester. He also curated ‘Festival Brasileiro’, which involved theater, dance, music and fine arts from Brazil, and challenged presiding conceptions of Brazilian culture. As part of the festival, he arranged for and conducted the Essex Youth Jazz Ensembles.

As a composer, Adriano has been commissioned by Bath Music Festival to write a new music piece for the opening of 2011 and 2012’s Bath festivals. He was also a composer/music director of dance-theatre piece Ballroom of Joys and Sorrows, a collaboration with Kate Flatt (original choreographer of Les Miserables). He has composed for dance companies, including Phoenix dance company 2016, with whom he wrote the score for ‘Undivided lovers’, a dance piece based on and celebrating Shakespeare’s 400 anniversary.

Education is part of Adriano’s life. He is often writing new music to collaborate with primary school pupils both singing and playing instruments.

Adriano has performed with leading word musicians such as the great singer Bobby Macferrin, and pianist Joanna McGregor with whom he still works and play as duo, combining classical, jazz and contemporary classical music.

Adriano Adewale with AKA Trio at WOMEX – Photo by Quique Curbelo

In 2018, Adriano formed AKA Trio, together with Italian guitarist Antonio Forcione and Senegalese kora player Seckou Keita. The trio released an album titled Joy in 2018.

Discography:

Sementes (2008)
The Vortex Sessions (Adventure Music, 2012)
Raizes (Caboclos Records, 2014)
Joy (Bendigedig , 2018)

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Artist Profiles: Carlos Malta

Carlos Malta at EXIB 2016 in Portugal – Photo by Angel Romero

Carlos Malta was born February 25, 1960 in Brazil. A master of flutes and other wind instruments, he has been described as The Wind Sculptor. Carlos plays piccolo, flute, fife, indigenous flutes, clarinet, and saxophone, among others.

He began playing professionally at the age of eighteen, performing with musicians such as Johnny Alf, Antonio Carlos & Jocáfi and Maria Creuza. In 1981 he joined Hermeto Pascoal, collaborating with him until 1993, when he began his solo career.

Carlos also performed with Egberto Gismonti, Pat Metheny, Gil Evans, Marcus Miller, Charlie Haden, Wagner Tiso, Laércio de Freitas and Nico Assumpção.

Carlos Malta at EXIB 2016 in Portugal – Photo by Angel Romero

He frequently acts as a studio musician, having participated in albums by Guinga, Lenine, Sergio Ricardo, Leila Pinheiro, Marcus Suzano, Paralamas do Sucesso, Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil (on the album São João Vivo, 2001).

In 1993, he teamed up with Swiss cellist Daniel Pezzotti to record the album “Rainbow”, competing for the 1995 Sharp Award.

He has participated as an instructor in festivals in Brazil and abroad since 1994. That year, he founded the groups Coreto Urbano (varied formation) and Pife Muderno (Carlos Malta, Andrea Ernest Dias, Marcos Suzano, Oscar Bolão and Durval Pereira).

In 1998 he released his first solo CD called “The Wind Sculptor”. The following year, the album “Carlos Malta and Pife Muderno” (1999) came out.

Carlos Malta at EXIB 2016 in Portugal – Photo by Angel Romero

In 2003 participated in the CD Os Bambas da Flauta, released by Kuarup.

Discography:

Hermeto Pascoal e Grupo, with Hermeto Pascoal (Som da Gente, 1982)
Lagoa da Canoa, with Hermeto Pascoal (Som da Gente, 1984)
Brasil Universo, with Hermeto Pascoal (Som da Gente, 1986)
Só não toca quem não quer, with Hermeto Pascoal (Som da Gente, 1987)
Festa dos Deuses, with Hermeto Pascoal (Polygram, 1992)
Instrumental no CCBB, with Laércio de Freitas (1993)
Rainbow, with Daniel Pezzoti (1993)
O Escultor do Vento (1998)
Carlos Malta e Pife Muderno (Rob Digital, 1999)
Pixinguinha – Alma e Corpo (2000)
Pimenta (500 Anos De Som, 2000)
Mapa (Tratore, 2005)
Wonderland (Edge Music, 2006)
After The Carnaval (Stunt Records, 2009)
Na Paleta do Pintor (Tratore, 2009)
Leve o Que Quiser (Tratore, 2015)
Samba Noir (Tratore, 2015)
O Mar Amor – Canções de Caymmi (Deckdisc, 2016)
Dreamland (Stunt Records, 2017)
Besouros (Deckdisc, 2017)
Alabê Ketujazz (Tratore, 2018)
Sertão do Mar (Madame Bobage production, 2019)

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Artist Profiles: Dona Onete

Dona Onete – Photo by Adriano Fagundes

Dona Onete was born on June 18, 1939 in Cachoeira do Ararí, located in the delta of the Amazon River, across from Belém. She grew up further down the river, in Igarapé Miri, 100km away from Belém, where she regularly attended local dances of carimbó, siriá and banguê. She explains she only started to sing suitably at the age of 11. “I used to spend the whole day on the river banks, washing clothes. One day, I saw a dolphin and thought that I should sing for him. The next day I sang again, and another came, and another, and soon a whole family of dolphins came to listen!”

By the age of fifteen, she was singing samba, quadrilhas, boi bumba and other northeastern Brazilian genres in the bars of her hometown. “One of my biggest musical influences are Marajoara, local cowboys who improvise songs. They turn common phrases into beautiful poetry and whenever I write a song, I remember them”.

She became a Professor of History and Amazonian Studies in Igaparé Miri and passionately researched the rhythms, dances and traditions of the indigenous and black people of the area. This led her to form several music and dance groups, which regenerated traditional customs, and that eventually saw her elected as the Municipal Secretary of Culture of Igaparé-Miri. “I helped local musicians and local culture that people didn’t value. I have the chance to help Amazonian communities through my music so I cannot just sing and close my eyes to the people’s plight.”

Dona Onete – Photo by Adriano Fagundes

Absorbing multiple genres and rhythms, Dona Onete also began to compose, creating the hybrid genre for which she would later become famous, the carimbó chamegado.

Carimbó is a rhythm and dance from Pará, influenced by both African and European traditions. However, Onete has her own vision of the genre – carimbó chamegado: “I took lundum and carimbó, two wonderful genres, and mixed them with the rhythm of the songs from the slaves to create carimbó chamegado. It’s slower and more sensual than carimbó,” she adds. She composed throughout her career over 300 songs, but it was not until she retired that her musical career took off, and even then, it was only by accident.

She and her second husband moved to the quiet area of Pedreira in Belém, with the intention of relaxing the rest of their days, singing as she always had done, for her own pleasure. A local band heard her singing though and she claims, “thought I was a young woman, because my songs are pretty cheeky. But when they caught sight of me they were shocked to see a lady of my age!”

Dona Onete – Photo by Adriano Fagundes

Her age and spicy sense of humor was undeniably part of the charm for this band who invited her to sing with them. Believing herself to be past her prime, Dona Onete initially rejected the offer but she agreed eventually and before long, she had become something of a cult figure in Belém. “Sometimes, when you think you’ve given all you’ve got, you realize that, in fact, you have a lot more ahead of you,” she stated.

She recorded her debut album Feitiço Caboclo aged 73 and an international release from Mais Um Discos in 2014 saw critics fall immediately for this high-spirited, saucy and sexy septuagenarian. Dona Onete received invitations to perform at high profile world music festivals and venues: WOMAD UK, Paris’s Cabaret Sauvage, and Portugal’s FMM Sines in 2015.

On Banzeiro, Onete proved that age is nothing but a number as she increased the tempo with tracks such as the banguê that is the title track plus the lively carimbó ‘Faceira’, among others. Banzeiro is the wave created by boats as they pass through the river.

After Banzeiro, Onete’s reputation has blossomed in Brazil. She performs throughout the country to mostly young audiences. She composed and sung the theme song for one of Brazil’s leading soap operas (A Força do Querer) and was awarded the Brazilian Ordem do Mérito Cultural in recognition for her contribution to Brazilian culture. She also plays benefit shows for endangered Amazonian tribes.

In 2019 she released Rebujo an album that features styles born in Belém: carimbós and bangues, as well as cumbia, romantic brega and samba. The album includes numerous Amazonian allusions: the piranha (Festa do Tubarão), mango-scented ticks (Vem Chamegar), biting tucandeira ants (Balanço do Açaí), African deities such as Borocô (Tambor do Norte) and banho de cheiro: an herbal bath used to ward off evil spirits (Mistura Pai D’Égua).

The title Rebujo is the name for the turbulence in a river created as currents pass through. The rebujo raises silt and detritus from the riverbed giving the Amazon its muddy color – and making the waters unsafe for swimmers.

Dona Onete produced Rebujo with long-time collaborator Pio Lobato (guitar) and also includes Breno Oliveira on bass, Marcos Sarrazin on saxophone, Vovô Batera on drums, and JP Cavalcante on percussion.

Dona Onete has gone from playing small bars in her hometown to thousand capacity shows across Brazil and some of Europe’s most respected festivals. “My energy comes from the river,” she says. “It’s like blood rushing through my veins, there’s no stopping it – or me

Discography:

Feitiço Caboclo (Na Music, 2012)
Banzeiro ( Mais Um Discos/Na Music, 2017)
Rebujo (Mais Um Discos, 2019)

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Artist profiles: Pretinho da Serrinha

Pretinho da Serrinha

Ângelo Vitor Simplício da Silva, better known as Pretinho da Serrinha, was born August 30, 1977 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Pretinho da Serrinha has become the most requested musician of the new samba generation because of his unique, talented way of playing percussion and cavaco (cavaquinho). Many of the greatest Brazilian artists have invited Pretinho to tour and record with them – names like Caetano Veloso, Chico Buarque, Gilberto Gil, Marisa Monte, Seu Jorge, Sergio Mendes.

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Artist profiles: Rogê

Rogê

Brazilian guitarist Rogê was born April 25, 1975 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He was inspired by masters like Baden Powell, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Dorival Caymmi, and Noel Rosa.

Rogê represents the new generation of artists of the Brazilian Popular Music movement. He plays a captivating kind of samba and moves effortlessly from bossa nova to samba and reggae with the ease of a prolific composer.

Rogê’s shows also present the roots of the Brazilian music and its connection to Africa through a combination of jongo, samba, afoxe and maculele.

He has released six albums (‘Rogê’ in 2003, ‘Brasil em Brasa‘ in 2008, ‘Fala Geral‘ in 2010, ‘Brenguele‘, 2012, ‘Baile do Brenguele‘ in 2014 and ‘Nomade’ in 2018) and 2 side projects (‘4 Cabeça’, that got a Brazilian Music Award as best album; and ‘NA VEIA’, along with Arlindo Cruz, leading them to a Latin Grammy nomination as best samba album).

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Artist Profiles: Zezo Ribeiro

Zezo Ribeiro is a Brazilian guitarist born in Sao Paulo, with an impressive artistic career. Since 1992 he has participated in many recording projects, but it was at the end of the 1990s when he decided to release his own work.

If as instrumentalist he is a virtuoso guitar player, aware of what is happening in jazz and flamenco world, as composer he explores all the rhythms of his fertile homeland. With the same natural way that he flies vertiginously over an intricate samba, he plays slowly with the intimacy of a calm bossa.

In a permanent searching of his roots, Zezo studies deeply the traditional music to adopt other rhythms and influences.

“Gandaia” features John Patitucci on bass, Brazilian drummer Cristiano Rocha, Spanish flamenco guitarist José Luis Montón, and Spanish singer Uxía.

Discography:

Gandaia (NubeNegra, 1998)

Flamencando (NubeNegra, 2001)

Brincadeira, with Chico César (NubeNegra, 2004)

Turbilhâo (NubeNegra, 2005)

Casa Verde (NubeNegra, 2005)

Acoustic Brazil, with Flavio Sandoval (Paulinas-Comep, 2016)

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Artist Profiles: Ze Cafofinho & suas corrente

Ze Cafofinho

Tiago de Melo Andrade, better known as Ze Cafofinho is part of Recife’s music scene. has one of the richest music production in Brazil. Situated in Northeast of this country, this city has been the birthplace of many talents, specially in the last fifteen years. Chico Science and Na?ao Zumbi, Siba & Fuloresta of Samba and DJ Dolores are just few examples. They have been responsible to bring a new vibration and rhythm in Brazil, mixing heritage from its historical tradition and contemporary tendencies and sounds. Ze Cafofinho, nickname of Tiago Andrade, belongs to this scene.

Ze Cafofinhoe is a musician, composer and singer. He has worked on music professionally for over 10 years, period in which Ze Cafofinho developed his mix of ska, jazz, macumba (afro religion) and samba. It is music from Pernambuco, Brazil, and it is good for dancing and listening.

He was a band leader of Songo, a group witch he created in 1990s; worked together with many important artists of Recife and had other experiences and projects, such as Variant and Versos, vialejos & quebranguladas.

Discography:

Um pé na meia, outro de fora (Tratore, 2007)
Casulo (Joinha Records, 2015)
Zé Cafofinho no Estúdio Showlivre (Ao Vivo) (Showlivre, 2017)

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Artist Profiles: Yamandu Costa

Yamandu Costa

Yamandu Costa was born in Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil in 1980. There, he began his guitar studies with his father Algacir Costa, band leader of “Os Fronteiriços”, when he was 7 years old. Later, he perfected his technique with Lucio Yanel, Argentine virtuoso who was then living in Brazil.

Until the age of 15, Yamandu’s only music school was the folk music from the south of Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay. Nevertheless, after he heard Radam?s Gnatall’s work, he decided to get in contact with the music of other renowned Brazilian musicians, such as Baden Powell, Tom Jobim, Raphael Rabello, among others. When he was 17, he played for the first time in Sao Paulo at “Circuito Cultural Banco do Brasil” (BB Cultural Tour). The event was produced by “Estudio Tom Brazil” (Tom Brazil studio), and from then on he was recognized as one of the most gifted guitar players of Brazil.

Considered by some one of the greatest geniuses of Brazilian music of all times, Yamandu deserves the highest praise. Whenever he is on stage, he fills with joy the most select audience since his impressive performance shows the deep intimacy between Yamandu and his guitar.

Yamandu is a guitar player, composer and arranger that does not fit into a single music style, yet he creates his own when he combines all of them playing his 7-string guitar. Yamandu Costa’s diverse styles include chorinho, bossa nova, milonga, tango, samba and chamamé.

Discography:

Dois Tempos, with Lúcio Yanel (Bagual Produções, 2000)
Yamandu (Eldorado, 2001)
Yamandu ao Vivo (Bagual Produções, 2003)
El Negro Del Blanco, with Paulo Moura (Biscoito Fino, 2004)
Brasileirinho (Rob Digital, 2005)
Tokyo Session (Koala Records, 2006)
Lida (Biscoito Fino, 2007)
Lado B, with Dominguinhos (Biscoito Fino, 2007)
Ida e Volta (GHA Records, 2007)
Mafuá (Biscoito Fino, 2008)
Yamandu Costa e Rogério Caetano (2011)
Live, with Hamilton de Holanda (Adventure Music, 2011)
Continente (Biscoito Fino, 2013)
Tocata à Amizade (Biscoito Fino, 2015)

DVDs:

Música do Brasil Vol.I (2005)
Yamandu Costa ao Vivo (2005)

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