Tag Archives: African music

Visa For Music 2020 Showcase Call for Submissions

The 7th edition of Visa For Music, the professional music market and festival focused on African and Middle-Eastern music, is now accepting submissions. The conference will take place November 18- 21, 2020 in Rabat, Morocco.

A total of 30 artists or groups will be chosen by a jury to perform in front of music industry professionals from around the world.

Visa For Music

The call for applications is open until March 31st, 2020.

To apply for the 7th edition of Visa For Music click on the submission instructions.

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The Exceptionally Expressive and Futuristic Les Amazones d’Afrique

Les Amazones d’Afrique – Amazones Powe

Les Amazones d’Afrique – Amazones Power (Real World Records Released 24 January 2020

Supergroup Les Amazones d’Afrique is back with another album highlighting leading female vocalists from West Africa. The expertly-crafted Amazones Power also showcases a modern and stylish vision of African music, combining edgy electronics, pop, reggae, funk, rock, infectious rhythms, and a new vision traditional music.

The lineup this time includes Mamani Keita (Mali), Rokia Koné (Mali) and new generation artists Fafa Ruffino (Benin), Niaru (Guinea), Ami Yerewolo (Mali), Nacera Ouali Mesbah (Algeria), Kandy Guira (Ivory Coast). On the album’s last track, ‘Power,’ the collective grows to 16 multi-generational vocalists spanning Africa, Europe and Latin America.

Amazones Power is not only about great music. The women also sing about social justice with a focus on women’s rights.

The Amazons also invited young male vocalists: Douranne (Boy) Fall and Magueye Diouk (Jon Grace) from Paris-based band Nyoko Bokbae.

Buy Amazones Power

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Artist Profiles: AfroCubism

Eliades Ochoa with Afrocubism in Raleigh, 2012 – photo by Angel Romero

AfroCubism was an ensemble of up to 14 master musicians from West Africa and Cuba brought together by the producer of Buena Vista Social Club.

The group included Eliades Ochoa (Cuba), guitarist and Buena Vista Social Club star; kora maestro Toumani Diabaté (Msali); legendary guitarist Djelimady Tounkara (Mali); balafon wizard Fode Lassana Diabaté (Guinea); ngoni virtuoso Bassekou Kouyate (Mali); José Ángel Martínez on acoustic bass (Cuba); Jorge Maturell (Cuba) on congas, bongos, cowbell; Onsel Odit (Cuba) on backing vocals and rhythm guitar; and Eglis Ochoa (Cuba) on maracas, güiro, backing vocals.

AfroCubism

The ensemble released the album AfroCubism in 2010 on World Circuit Records.

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Afro Roots Fest 2020 Program in Miami Announced

Sinkane

Performing arts presenters Community Arts & Culture and Rhythm Foundation have announced the Afro Roots Fest 2020 lineup at the North Beach Bandshell on Saturday, April 25, 2020.

Alsarah

 The artists set to perform are Sudanese American Sinkane and Sudanese artists Alsarah and her band the Nubatones. DJ Le Spam will open the night.

North Beach Bandshell is located at 7275 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, Florida, USA.

More about Afro Roots Fest and ticket information.

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Africa Oyé Festival Announces 2020 Dates

Malawian sensation Gasper Nali on the Africa Oyé Main Stage, 2019 – Photo by Teltone

The 28th annual Africa Oyé festival is set to take place at Sefton Park in Liverpool, UK on June 20th and 21st, 2020. The festival will showcase the music and culture of Africa and the Diaspora, along with DJs and dance, as well as workshops, food vendors and traders in the Oyé Village.

In 2019, Africa Oyé broke its single-day attendance record and took two awards at the inaugural Liverpool City Region Culture & Creativity Awards.

Oyé’s Artistic Director, Paul Duhaney said: “In 2019 we focused on the amazing music from across the wider African Diaspora, so this year we’ll be looking at a more traditional Oyé line-up. Local artists will once again open the music offering each day via our Oyé Introduces program, and we’ll again be showcasing community acts, giving some Liverpool creatives the chance to share the stage with world music stars.”

The first of the main stage artists are set to be revealed next month.

More at Africa Oyé

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Mamadou Diabaté, Diabel Cissokho and Sourakata Koité to Perform at Jazz Café in London

Three leading instrumentalists from West Africa are set to perform at the Jazz Café in London, UK on Wednesday, December 4, 2019.  The show will feature Mamadou Diabaté (Burkina Faso), Diabel Cissokho (Senegal) and Sourakata Koité (Senegal).

Mamadou Diabate (not to be confused with the kora player with the same name) is a balafon maestro and composer born in Burkina Faso with an impressive technique.

Diabel Cissokho was Baaba Maal’s kora player. He has toured internationally with his family’s band Bannaya, as well as with renowned musicians like Cheikh Lo, Ernest Ranglin and Youssou N’Dour.

Mamadou Diabaté, Diabel Cissokho and Sourakata Koité

Sourakata Koite is a Paris-based kora master from Senegal. His 1984 debut album En Hollande was reissued by Awesome Tapes From Africa.

Jazz Café, 5 Parkway, Camden Town, London NW1 7PG, UK

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Interview with Composer and Bassist Dawn Drake

Dawn Drake

American composer and multi-instrumentalist Dawn Drake and her band ZapOte have a new album titled Nightshade. She discusses her background and the new recording with World Music Central.

What are your fondest musical memories?

My fondest musical memories are of playing for crowds of dancers whether they are school children, sambistas, late night dance party-goers at Bembe in Brooklyn, for salsa dancers at Brooklyn Academy of Music Cafe or the Kimmel Center’s “La Noche” Latin Music Series.

What was the first tune you learned?

I learned the “Boogie Woogie” also known as “In the Mood” by Glen Miller on piano when I was five.

What do you consider as the essential elements of your music?

Essential elements are polyrhythmic percussion and heavy bass.

Dawn Drake

How did your musical ideas evolve throughout the years from your debut album to your latest recordings?

My musical ideas have become more composition and arrangement-oriented and less “singer-songwriter” based, though I still intend to put out more music with electronic production that may return to even simpler formats.

Your band ZapOte is named after a fruit found in Mexico and the Caribbean. I know this fruit as mamey. What led you to name your band ZapOte?

I see ZapOte as a very feminine fruit. It’s also delicious. The first song I ever wrote as an adult is the chorus of my song “Zapote” which was recorded on my previous album “Everythinglessness”. The song came to me after my first or second visit to Santiago de Cuba, a place that has inspired me greatly with its music, dance and culture over the years. Santiago de Cuba is the first place that I encountered the zapote fruit and I liked it instantly as well as the word itself.

Dawn Drake and ZapOte

Tell us about your new album, Nightshade.

The album is a culmination of various sessions played by a lot of New York’s finest musicians and audio wizards. Please refer to this description for more… It goes into detail about the overall darker mood of the album, the use of the iconography of the Yoruba orisha Oya as it coincides with the seasons and this particular season of darkness and the Day of the Dead, the homage to the ancestors who came before us and the hardships they went through, and how through making art and music come alive; when we make something out of nothing, we can heal the pains of the past and in the process bring people together and create community that may not have existed otherwise.

Dawn Drake and ZapOte – Nightshade

Who plays on Nightshade? Who are the musicians you are currently working with?

I am currently working with Mara Rosenbloom on keys, Eliane Amherd on guitar and vocals, Alicyn Yaffee on guitar, Jackie Coleman on trumpet (for over a decade now), Paula Winter (also for a decade!), Lynn Ligammari on tenor sax, and Beza Gebre on drums. For the album release, Patrick Hall has joined us on trombone and Karen Joseph on flute as well as my long time colleagues Buffy Drysdale and Elizabeth Sayre on batá drums.

Although I liked Nightshade overall, the electronics on the futuristic “Oya de Zarija” track really caught my attention. Will you be making more music in this direction?

Yes, that is my intention, to produce more tracks in that style in the future. Glad you like it!

In the press release you mentioned the bass chose you. What do you mean by that?

I meant that one day I went to a guitar store intending to buy a guitar and impulsively bought a bass instead which the store owner kindly told me came with a “gig bag”. I had never played the bass before and I certainly didn’t intend to get any “gigs” with it but after playing in my living room for a year, I ended up in the bass chair with Geoff Mann (Herbie Mann’s son) on drums, Viva Deconcini and Matt Moon (all from the New School of Jazz) in a band called Buttershack. From there, I have played hundreds of gigs on the bass.

Mainstream media does not provide an outlet for world music. In what ways are you promoting your music?

I promote through Youtube, Spotify, Apple, my email list and my live shows. It is not easy and I am looking for new avenues to promote my music. I would love to land a licensing deal and/or find other ways to get more listenership.

Dawn Drake and ZapOte live at the Shrine

What advice would you give to beginners, especially young women, who want to make music out of the pop and hip hop mainstream?

I would say, study and practice very hard to be the best you can be at your craft whether that is playing your instrument, singing and/or writing. It seems also that it pays off to get very good at learning how to promote yourself on Instagram. This is something I am really trying to improve at. I would also say that tenacity and risk taking are key. I personally have gained a lot from reading and doing the exercises in The Artist Way by Julia Cameron.

If you could gather any additional musicians, or bands, to collaborate with, whom would that be?

I would love to collaborate with Captain Planet, Antibalas and/or perhaps a producer who I don’t know yet who is interested in my work! One of my dream is to record a tune with musicians from Alexander Abreu and Havana d’ Primera in Cuba and possibly another upcoming artist in Cuba “Cimafunk”.

I recently went to Senegal this year to further my understanding of sabar drumming and mbalax music and I would love to collaborate with Thiat Seck and other Senegalese mbalax singers and musicians. I want to continue collaborating with international artists and it remains one of my main goals to continue to expand outward and do more projects with musicians abroad.

Aside from the release of Nightshade, do you have any additional upcoming projects to share with us?

We have several shows coming up in New York City, namely Bembe in Brooklyn (81 South 6th st.) November 17th at 11 pm and Shrine World Music (Adam Clayton Powell jr. Blvd between 133rd and 134th streets) in Harlem on December 21st at 10 pm.

I have also been selected to participate and present my music in a seminar sponsored by the US State Department called “Art, Culture and Transforming Conflict” in Santa Fe, New Mexico December 10-14. We hope to do more State Department sponsored tours abroad in the coming years.

In the meantime we also have a regular Tuesday night show called “Mardi Gras Fat Tuesdays” at Club 33 Lafayette in Brooklyn on 33 Lafayette Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11217, every Tuesday 8-11 pm starting November 12.

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West African Stars Bombino and Vieux Farka Touré to Perform at Carrboro ArtsCenter

Bombino

Two of the finest guitarists from the Saharan region, Bombino and Vieux Farka Touré are set to perform on Sunday, October 13th at 8:00 p.m., at The ArtsCenter in Carrboro, North Carolina.

Vieux Farka Toure – Photo by Thomas Arnbo

The “Sons of the Sahara” show is a unique collaboration in which Bombino (Niger) and Vieux Farka Touré (Mali) perform separately and together, electric and acoustic.

More information at Artscenter
More about Bombino and Vieux Farka Touré

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Karim Dabo’s Path to Peace

Karim Dabo

One day, I stumbled across Karim Dabo’s music online and I was transfixed. His vocals are soft and sensitive.

Even though you may not understand the lyrics as he sings in Wolof (a West African language), as a listener you are soothed and comforted by their gentleness. The vocals invite you into an atmosphere of peace, even relaxation. Karim is a good percussionist, but it is his singing that holds you in an embrace. In January 2014, his debut album “Sama Yone” came out. The sound is very spare, light, and acoustic with only drums, guitar, bass, kora and percussion accompanying his voice. Yet there is power in the simplicity. It sounds like folk music. Out of curiosity and wanting to learn more, I reached out to Karim for an interview and he responded.

Karim grew up in a household of music. His Senegalese father is a percussionist who loved traditional Senegalese music and the Mande music of West Africa. When asked about his father, he says, “My father’s story is important. When he was young he wanted to play music, but in our culture, it was forbidden to him, because it was not supposed to be part of our family. This was a family that was known for their work in business. Music is a genre reserved for the griots in West Africa. When my dad emigrated to France in his twenties, he played music, but in his head it was forbidden.”

Was music also forbidden to you?

No, nobody forbid me to play, because I grew up in France, I was not directly confronted with these concerns. When I returned home to Senegal with my music, my family were very open-minded. We started learning percussion as children with the jembe and dundun (Karim has five brothers and one sister). My mother is French; she is a teacher of African dance. Together, we played percussion to accompany her dancing lessons.”

Karim came of age in Annecy, France, a small mountainous town near to Geneva. He said “there is a spirit of peace in the mountains,” but felt it was too quiet to remain there. He was drawn to the possibility of moving to Montreal, Canada. Unexpectedly, he met Mafé, a Haitian-Québécoise singer based in Montreal who was visiting France. They began to make music together, and it was after meeting her that he moved in July 2013 to Montreal.

Yours is an incredible voice, when did you start to sing?

“I always sang when I was young, but only in my room. The kind of singing I am doing on this album, I started three years ago. Before I played a lot of percussion, but then I decided I wanted to try to create my own sound with guitar and singing.”

Karim Dabo

Why did you want to make your own sound?

I just wanted to discover the guitar, a new instrument for me. Also, one of my brothers, Sebastian Pintiaux, is a good guitarist and he sings. His music inspired me and he helped me to record and make the arrangements for this album.”

The music on the album is very spare and simple: is that deliberate?

“Yes, I wanted to keep the instrumentals quiet, basic, to give space for the voice.

Can you tell me about the track Africa? I ask, its cyclical music flows in the back of my head. An upbeat sound, the word Africa is pronounced many times as a chant throughout the song. The gentle strumming of an acoustic guitar, drums and light ripple of percussion accompany the steady vocal.

I am saying to African people we can make a choice for our development. It is not necessary to take a path in the same direction as Europe and America. We can make our own way. I believe this message is important, because when I go to Dakar, Senegal, I see a paradox in the people. I see a lot of people who want to live the same life as Americans or Europeans, but they are not being authentic to Africa.

This song is about how we can have our own way of life without being influenced by the West. The track was also inspired by the African musician Tiken Jah Fakoly, whose music often communicates directly and strongly with African people. I am saying we can build an authentic Africa, with an African spirit. Africa is beautiful and I think we can do a lot of things in Africa. In this song there is a little bit of revolution because I want to see African people strong and proud.”

Karim Dabo – Sama Yone

Your vocals carry the sound forward, because they are from the heart. Your singing sounds thoughtful. Your voice reminds me a lot of Geoffrey Oryema’s vocals. He has a very calming, steady, almost hypnotic sound. He is from Uganda.

“Yes, I know him. The track Diorme which means give me, is in the same spirit of Geoffrey Oryema. Even if you cannot understand him, you can tell the message is deep. But he is a great singer and I am a bit nervous to be compared to him.”

Yes, his vocals are haunting. They stay with you. But your vocals also have a haunting quality.

“There is a meditative aspect to my music. I want to convey peace. My singing is a reflection of what is going on inside me, a sense of introspection.

Karim Dabo

The track Jamm has that spiritual sense in it. Jamm is a gentle, meditative song with a steady rhythm. The same words are repeated, but the repetition is calming, not boring. The sound is restful.

“Yes, Jamm means peace in Wolof. In this song, I am talking about how a sense of peace comes from the sky and inspires me, but how peace may also inspire another person.”

So, is peace important to you?

“I am also a Social Worker, I work with people who are in difficulty. I’ve worked with disabled people and troubled youth. I’ve also learned to understand people by the way they play music. Through this experience I learned peace and self-control.

Karim has used music in his Social Work practice as a way to connect with others and to enable clients to express emotions or difficulties that they may carry inside.

Because you have to remain calm to do Social Work?

“Yes, and that’s why I decided to create music with a spirit of peace and love for humanity. A lot of people do not understand the vocals because they are in Wolof, but they can feel this calm in the music. And to make a world of peace, we have to do a lot of work inside ourselves. That’s why on this album, I am starting from within. Other people have taught me a lot, I want to offer them peace through music in exchange.

To find out more about Karim Dabo, you can visit his website at www.karim-dabo.com

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Ongala Music Festival 2019 to Feature Rising East African Acts

Tanzanian group Ze Spirits Band

The second annual Ongala Music Festival will take place August 23 to 25 in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. The festival is named after celebrated Tanzanian musician Remmy Ongala. The event celebrates the rising talent of Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda.

For more information about the lineup go to ongalamusicfest.co.tz

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