Tag Archives: Scottish music

Introduction to Celtic Music

Irish band The Chieftains, one of the most popular Celtic music acts

It’s difficult to know what the music of the ancient Celts sounded like. Historical and archaeological data indicates that the Celts used bronze horns, flutes and bells.

What we know as Celtic music today is in reality the traditional music developed relatively recently in several western European Atlantic regions that may have been inhabited by Celtic peoples about 2,000 years ago.

Current Celtic music is characterized by the use of various forms of bagpipes (likely introduced by the Romans), harps, fiddles, flutes and whistles, accordion and concertina, and frame drums. In the 1970s, Irish musicians pioneered the use of additional instruments such as the Greek bouzouki, the Spanish guitar, the American banjo and the Italian mandolin, and adapted them to Irish traditional music.

Recent Celtic music history

The great Celtic music upsurge took place in the 1970s thanks to various influential artists from Ireland, Scotland, Brittany (France), Galicia (Spain) and Wales.

Ireland

The Bothy Band

Irish groups such as The Chieftains, The Bothy Band, Plantxy, Clannad and The Dubliners attracted worldwide attention with their innovative, beautifully-crafted arrangements of Irish folk music that were later adopted by colleagues in other Celtic countries and regions, as well as other folk music traditions.

Although many of the best known acts from the 1960s and 1970s disbanded, The Chieftains and Clannad carried on to develop highly successful long careers.

Altan in 2010

A new wave of first class artists continued to popularize Irish traditional and contemporary folk music: Enya, Altan, Kila, Dervish, Lunasa, Andy Irvine, Davy Spillane, Frankie Gavin, John Doyle, Karan Casey, Kila, Liam O’Flynn, Matt Molloy, Micheal Ó Domhnaill, Moya Brennan (Máire Brennan), Mick Moloney, Moving Cloud, Niall Vallely, Niamh Parsons, Oisin Mac Diarmada, Paddy Keenan, Reeltime, Sharon Shannon, Susan McKeown, Téada, and The Gloaming.

Books about Irish traditional music: Focus: Irish Traditional Music (Focus on World Music Series) by Sean Williams, Routledge (2009); Companion to Irish Traditional Music by Fintan Vallely, Cork University Press (2011); O’Brien Pocket History of Irish Traditional Music (Pocket History series) by Gearoid O hAllmhurain, The O’Brien Press (2004); A Short History of Irish Traditional Music by Gearoid O hAllmhurain, The O’Brien Press (2017).

Scotland

Silly Wizard in 1983

Seminal Scottish acts Silly Wizard, Battlefield Band, Tannahill Weavers, Boys of the Lough and Ossian played outstanding contemporary Scottish folk music and created a school of followers.

The next generations of first rate Scottish artists included Alasdair Fraser, Aly Bain, Blazin’ Fiddles, Bodega, Boys of the Lough, Breabach, Burach, Capercaillie, Wolfstone, Catherine-Ann MacPhee, Catriona MacDonald, Lau, Peatbog Faeries, Shooglenifty and Treacherous Orchestra.

Brittany

Alan Stivell

Breton musician Alan Stivell introduced the Celtic harp to large audiences. Two innovative bands, Diaouled ar Menez and Gwendal, also from Brittany, toured Europe extensively for two decades with its blend of Celtic music, jazz and rock.

Additional essential Breton musicians include Dan Ar Bras, Barzaz, Bleizi Ruz, Alain Genty, Gwerz, Kornog, Soig Siberil, Skolvan, Jean-Michel Veillon, Andrea Ar Gouilh, Anne Auffret, Yann-Fañch Kemener, and Nolwenn Korbell.

Galicia

Early lineup of Milladoiro

In Galicia, singer and harp player Emilio Cao, the now legendary group Milladoiro, Doa, piper celebrity Carlos Núñez and the influential Traditional Music of the Municipal School of Arts and Trades of Vigo (currently known as the Municipal School of Traditional and Folk Music of Vigo) initiated the remarkable Galician Celtic music wave.

Carlos Núñez in 2017

In the 1980s, a significant new act was formed, Luar na Lubre. This group has become one of the leading ensembles in the the Galician folk music scene.

In the 1990s and afterwards, additional key bands and soloists appeared, including Matto Congrio, Fía na Roca, Berroguetto, Na Lua, Leilia, piper and flutist Xosé Manuel Budiño, Mercedes Peón, pipers Susana Seivane and Cristina Pato, Rosa Cedrón and the spectacular Son de Seu folk orchestra.

Wales

A revival of traditional folk music and a renewed interest in the use of its native Gaelic language took place in Wales in the 1970’s. With the help of local media and record companies like Sain, artists who represented the Welsh tradition and language finally got exposure.

Robin Huw Bowen

One of the essential musicians in Wales is Robin Huw Bowen, a master of the triple harp. He researched the music and methods of the old Welsh harpers by studying their old manuscripts. He has performed widely throughout the world, as a soloist and also as a member of the Welsh folk groups Mabsant and Cusan Tân.

Siân James

The best known Gaelic-language singer is Siân James. Aside from her solo career, James also performed with dub reggae and rock bands.

On the traditional folk scene, Calennig’s lively dance music attracts attention. The band, formed in 1978, was led by Pat Smith and Mick Tems. Their material includes Welsh, Galician and Breton tunes. The 2019 lineup featured founder Pat Smith on concertina, Ned Clamp on guitar, Jem Randles on bass guitar, and virtuoso fiddler Iolo Jones.

Other Welsh folk highlights include singer Julie Murphy, Heather Jones and Hin Deg. An exciting group in the contemporary folk style is Carreg Lafar, formed in 1993.

Jamie Smith’s Mabon in 2017

One of the finest Celtic roots acts was Jamie Smith’s Mabon, led by accordion maestro Jamie Smith. The group disbanded in 2019.

Inter-Celtic Festivals

Thanks to the proliferation of Inter-Celtic festivals since the 1970s, musicians from Brittany, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Galicia, Asturias, the USA, Canada and other locations, have exchanged tunes, musical instruments and participated in mutual recordings.

Celtic Connections, Old-Fruitmarket – Photo by Gaelle Beri

Some of the top Celtic music festivals include Celtic Colours (Cape Breton, Canada), Celtic Connections (Scotland, UK), Festival Interceltique de Lorient (Brittany, France), Ortigueira Festival of Celtic World (Galicia, Spain), Ballyshannon Folk and Traditional Music Festival (Ireland) and William Kennedy Piping Festival (Northern Ireland, UK).

Cwlwm Celtaidd in Wales celebrates the music from Ireland, Scotland, Isle of Man, Cornwall, Brittany and Wales.

Celtic Music Today

The major European centers of Celtic music today are Ireland, Scotland, Brittany (France), Galicia (Spain), Asturias (Spain) and Wales (UK). Other smaller regions with a strong Celtic music heritage are: Cornwall (UK), Northumbria (UK), Tras-os-Montes (Portugal) and the Isle of Man (UK).

Outside Europe, the music from the Irish, Scottish and Galician diaspora has found a comfortable home in eastern Canada, the United States of America, and to a lesser extent Argentina and Australia.

Canadian Celtic and world music star, Loreena McKennitt

The Celtic music artists recovered the hurdy gurdy in Brittany and Galicia, the Celtic harp in Brittany and Scotland, and a newfound respect for the bagpipe, including the uilleann pipe, Highland pipe, border pipe, Scottish smallpipe, gaita gallega, gaita asturiana, gaita de fole and binioù.

Celtic music today has crossed over into the pop mainstream, world music, rock and new age thanks to artists like AfroCelt Sound System (UK), Enya (Ireland), Altan (Ireland), Loreena McKennit (Canada), The Chieftains (Ireland), Capercaillie (Scotland), Ashley McIsaac (Canada), Solas (USA), Connie Dover (USA), Cherish the Ladies (USA), Shooglenifty (Scotland), the electronic bagpipe innovator Hevia (Asturias, Spain) and The Gloaming (Ireland). There is also the success of the Riverdance dance shows. Celtic Woman and the lighter, easy listening side of Celtic music has sold well in the new age market by way of numerous compilations, harp recordings and concept albums.

The 1995 hit Sleepy Maggie by fiddler Ashley MacIsaac :

Piracy, consolidation, streaming and other factors have led to the demise and consolidation of many of the great Celtic music record labels of the past.

Brief History of the Celts

Ancient Greek historians, like Herodotus (400 BC) and Hecataeus of Miletus (500 BC), wrote about the Keltoi, a group of Iron Age “barbarian” tribes with a common language and culture that inhabited vast territories of Europe. The Keltoi’s dominion stretched from Ireland and the western Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) in the west to Bohemia (Czech Republic), Bavaria (Germany) and Austria in the east.

Castro de Baroña Celtic settlement in Galicia, Spain – Photo courtesy of Turismo de Galicia

The Celts were a mixture of western Indo-European peoples who created vivid ornamental art and spoke a language described by the Romans as Celtic. Their social power structure included warlords and priests known as druids. They lived in hill towns made to defend populated areas from other warring Celtic tribes. With the arrival of the Roman Empire, Celtic civilization nearly disappeared. Most of western Europe, except Ireland, was Romanized.

Celtic History books:

The Ancient Celts by Barry Cunliffe, Oxford University Press (1997); The Sea Kingdoms: The History of Celtic Britain & Ireland by Alistair Moffat, Birlinn Ltd (2001); Saxons, Vikings, and Celts: The Genetic Roots of Britain and Ireland by Bryan Sykes, W. W. Norton & Company (2006); Celts: The History and Legacy of One of the Oldest Cultures in Europe by Martin J. Dougherty, Amber Books (2015); The Celts: A History From Earliest Times to the Present by Bernhard Maier, Edinburgh University Press (2018); Los Celtas. Imaginario, mitos y literatura en España by Martín Almagro-Gorbea, Almazara (2018): Celts: A Captivating Guide to Ancient Celtic History and Mythology, Including Their Battles Against the Roman Republic in the Gallic Wars, CH Publications (2019).

Share

Treacherous Orchestra, Brawny Superband

Good festival bands convert listeners into fans. Some even inspire amateur musicians in the audience to quit their day jobs and go on tour. Probably, Treacherous Orchestra inspires young Scottish men to wear black vests and get tattoos, but also, this brawny superband fathered my World Fusion playlist.

…Not exclusively, of course. Daniel Steinberg (Hillbillies From Mars) turned me on to Treacherous Orchestra, so he can also be blamed for my latest addiction. This was back in the days (close to a year ago) when some grumpy Redditor described world music as ear-candy for restless housewives, and I thought to myself “Great! If other housewives listen to my favorite music, I would love to meet them!” But, of course, I understood the grump’s complaint, and I also realized that he had never listened to my playlist. Then one old school guitarist, who did listen, remarked with disgust, “How can you even call this music? It’s just a bunch of ideas.”

Fortunately, today’s general populace is starting to understand what world fusion is/isn’t (compared with New Age and the older genre called world music). New artists emerging every week are building momentum with their genre-bending twists on traditional ethnic music. Still you’ll notice good old Treacherous Orchestra hovering at the top of my playlist. That’s not only because they were my First Love. It’s because in my humble opinion: 1. Their music is stupendous, and 2. Their track “Numbers” magnificently announces, “Here’s what I believe world fusion is, or maybe ought to be.” Wikipedia seems to concur, because its latest definition embraces everything on my playlist: World Fusion playlist.

Treacherous Orchestra

Now, if you’re seeking a fancy micro-analysis of Treacherous Orchestra’s melodic hooks and mathematical phrasing, you’ll need to consult a Certified Music Major. I’ve got just enough book knowledge to be dangerous. I can only differentiate 6/8 from 3/4 by humming, and I hate talking out my rear end. So my evaluations are purely based on intuition. The way it happened with Treacherous Orchestra was like this: I had an epiphany. Within seconds of hearing Numbers, I felt whisked out of my chair to a place that wasn’t Scotland (the band’s homeland) or even outer space, but rather, a place surpassing all spoken language.

Some ethnic fusion is really just a mishmash, like potstickers and tacos in the same buffet with quiche; Likewise, some world music has all the pizzaz of mild Mexican chili; But not Treacherous Orchestra. Their music seduced me like spicy watermelon gazpacho (exotic, intense and deeply satisfying). My cheeks flushed. Give me another round of whatever that is!

Treacherous Orchestra – Grind

In a frenzy of excitement, I asked Daniel Steinberg for more recommendations, and surfed Spotify, until I found myself creating a playlist like no other. This giant world fusion collection will always be a work-in-progress, continually broadening one cohesive journey, like a series of themed-rooms linked together by curious passages. Curating the playlist feels like creating a global Concept Album.     

So, for the likes of you, I’m about to start publishing spotlight reviews. They will feature some bands already on the playlist, plus many new discoveries. If you enjoy what you hear, please come again!

If you are going to visit the playlist now, please don’t hit Shuffle Play (the arrow), or you will just hear chaos rather than a journey. Start at the top, but then notice as you go down that there are many good places to begin your next journey.

Of course you will hear Numbers first. Prepare yourself by imagining the cream of Scotland: Nearly a dozen sensational folk musicians, mostly shrink-wrapped in black, with tattoos exposed, hairy from birth, reeking of pheromones (or maybe Old Spice), blowing, squeezing and beating every manner of finicky Celtic instrument as casually as jocks dribbling basketballs. These youngsters make their profession look easy. Yet nobody could mistake Treacherous Orchestra for a jam band. This big-rig clearly has an expert driver. So marvel at the band’s exquisite precision. Analyze how its melodic phrasing shifts mathematically, within a fixed time signature. Press Repeat, and then let yourself stop thinking…

Share

Artist Profiles: Simon Thoumire

Simon Thoumire

Simon Thoumire was born July 11, 1970 in Edinburgh, Scotland. An acknowledged concertina virtuoso, Thoumire has dazzled audiences all over the world with his playing.

A winner of the prestigious BBC Radio 2 Young Tradition Award in 1989, Simon has always been interested in exploring different genres of music, releasing many records over the years delving into folk, jazz, improvisation and composition.

Simon has also pursued interests in the industry side of traditional music forming Foot Stompin’ Records in 1997, Scottish Traditional Music Trust (2000) and Hands Up for Trad (2003). United Kingdom Europe

Discography:

Exhibit A, with Fergus MacKenzie ‎(Iona, 1995)
The Big Day In, with David Milligan ‎(Foot Stompin’ Records, 2001)
Brothers In Music ‎(DUNS, 2004)
Third Flight Home, with David Milligan ‎(Foot Stompin’ Records, 2007)

Share

Artist Profiles: Tony McManus

Tony McManus

Guitarist Tony McManus was born in 1965 in Paisley, Scotland. He is a leading figure in contemporary Celtic music. His style is influenced by the entire Celtic diaspora – Scotland, Ireland, Brittany, Galicia, Asturias, Cape Breton, Quebec – along with still further-ranging flavors, such as jazz and east European music.

His skills are also in constant demand by fellow musicians and he has featured on over 50 albums by other artists, including Kate Rusby, Alison Brown, William Jackson, Brian McNeill, Liz Doherty, Colin Reid and Catriona Macdonald, in addition to innumerable live guest appearances.

Other collaborations include his celebrated partnership with master Scottish fiddler Alasdair Fraser. In 2005, McManus released a CD with Breton fretless bass player, Alain Genty titled Singing Sands.

Discography:

Tony McManus (Greentrax, 1996)
Pourquoi Quebec (Greentrax, 1998)
Return to Kintail, with Alasdair Fraser (Culburnie, 1999)
Ceol More (Compass, 2002)
Singing Sands with Alain Genty (Compass, 2005)
The Maker’s Mark (Compass, 2008)
Mysterious Boundaries (Compass, 2013)
Round Trip, with Beppe Gambetta (Borealis, 2015)

Share

Glasgow Gets Hometown love from Mary Ann Kennedy

Mary Ann Kennedy – ‘Glaschu’ Home Town Love Song (ARC Music EUCD2833, 2019)

Scottish singer and arranger Mary Ann Kennedy (Màiri Anna NicUalraig) celebrates her hometown, Glasgow and her Gaelic roots in ‘Glaschu’ (Glasgow in Gaelic). ‘Glaschu’ brings together captivating song, insightful poetry and superb Celtic music from the Scottish and Irish traditions, featuring bodhran, whistles, and uilleann pipes.

Mary Ann Kennedy – Glaschu

Gaelic is spoken by an estimated 60,000 people in Scotland and Mary Ann Kennedy is involved in the promotion and safeguarding of the language. She sings beautifully in Gaelic throughout the album and the CD booklet includes the lyrics in Gaelic and English.

Mary Ann Kennedy goes beyond Celtic arrangements and instrumentation and incorporates classical chamber music elements, blues, mesmerizing folk ballads, evocative jazz (think of ECM), urban sound effects, and poetry readings.

‘Glaschu’ is a masterfully crafted recording enclosed in exquisite packaging. It is a tribute to the melting pot of Glasgow where various musical traditions and religions have coexisted for years. A wonderful place where Gaelic roots meets urban life.

Purchase Glaschu in North America

Purcgase Glaschu in Europe

Share

Artist Profiles: Maeve MacKinnon

Maeve MacKinnon

Maeve Mackinnon is one of Scotland’s foremost young Gaelic and Scots singers. A versatile singer, she studied Gaelic song at RSAMD and maintained a deep interest in Scots and Irish folk song and bluegrass.

Her dynamic vocals and warm stage presence have led to her being invited to broadcast numerous times on national radio and in several Gaelic music TV series; most recently Bob Kenyon’s current Gaelic music series, Guthan nan Gaidheal (STV, 2006).

Maeve is currently finishing off her debut solo album, produced by Duncan Lyall (Croft No.5) and Ali Hutton (Back of the Moon). Comprised of Gaelic and folk songs from different areas and with a distinctive groove throughout, Maeve’s debut album was released on Footstompin Records.

Discography:

Don’t Sing Lovesongs (Footstompin Records, 2007)
Once Upon an Olive Branch (2012)

Share

Artist Profiles: Dick Gaughan

Dick Gaughan – Photo by Genia Ainsworth

Dick Gaughan Dick Gaughan has been a professional musician and singer since 1970 and made his first solo album in 1971. Working mainly in the areas now known as Folk or Celtic music, he has recorded quite extensively since then in many countries and in various combinations. Has also worked extensively as a session musician in a wide variety of musical styles.

Having very eclectic tastes, he also plays everything from free jazz and rock to country music and has studied orchestration to develop his compositional and midi programming skills. He plays most fretted stringed instruments but his natural instrument is acoustic guitar. With 28 recordings to his credit, including the seminal Handful of Earth (1981), A Different Kind Of Love Song (1983) and Redwood Cathedral (1998) Gaughan remains a powerful force in the world of contemporary and traditional music and song.

Dick Gaughan was born in Glasgow in 1948 – he was an accidental Glaswegian, because his father was temporarily working as an engine driver at Colville’s Steelworks there. Dick really belonged to Leith, the one-time thriving port on the Firth of Forth now absorbed by Edinburgh, where his parents returned after a short while.

His mother, Frances MacDonald, was from Lochaber, and her first language was Gaelic. With the language came the Gaelic songs – as a child she had won a silver medal at the National Mod of An Comunn Gaidhealach, the annual Gaelic festival in Scotland. Dick’s father – also Dick – was born in Leith of an Irish father who spoke the Irish version version of Gaelic and played the fiddle. Dick’s grandmother, Bridget, born in Glasgow of Irish parents, played accordion and also sang.

It’s not surprising that Dick Gaughan picked up a guitar at the age of seven. As a teenager, growing up with guitar skills in an urban environment in the Sixties, he dabbled with rock, country and blues. It was a fabulous time for music-making, when no holds were barred. But for him, increasingly the music and the politics began to come together. Rock may have been an angry outpouring of sound, but it was on the quieter folk scene, with the great Hamish Henderson, Ewan MacColl, Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger all leading the protest march, that the most penetrating and persuasive statements were being made about war and peace, about the state of society. Dick was soon in the thick of the burgeoning folk revival, and at the age of 22 decided to hit the road as a solo singer and guitarist.

By 1972, he had replaced Mike Whellans in the outstanding all-acoustic, Scots-Irish band the Boys of the Lough, that included the great Aly Bain on fiddle, and appeared on their first album. He left the Boys in the following year.

His own first album, No More Forever, issued in 1972, was well received. Few could have expected his next move – joining fiddler Chuck Fleming and others in a wild and often wonderful electric band called Five Hand Reel, whose rocking rhythms and great songs – including Dick’s irresistible stab at the Gaelic lines of Bratach Bana – exasperated the purists and found a newer, younger audience. He was out of it by 1978 and returned to solo work.

In 1981 he laid down his marker as one of the great voices of contemporary Scotland with Handful of Earth. With Ed Pickford’s Workers’ Song and Leon Rosselson’s World Turned Upside Down – about the Diggers’ revolt that reminded Dick that “the first colony of the British Empire was England” – Dick Gaughan became a fully-fledged troublemaker of song. But alongside these polemical eruptions were softer, ruminative pieces such as Phil Colclough’s achingly wistful Song for Ireland, Robert Burns’ Westlin’ Winds, and a reworked version of Both Sides the Tweed, which served to express Dick’s abhorrence of anti-English sentiment in pursuit of the rightful cause of Scottish self-belief. A poll conducted by the magazine Folk Roots voted Handful of Earth the top album of the 1980s.

In 2004, Dick was voted Scots Singer of the Year in the Scottish Traditional Music Awards.

In 2016, Dick Gaughan had a stroke and stopped performing.

Discography:

No More Forever (Trailer, 1972)
Kist o’ Gold (Trailer, 1976)
Coppers and Brass (Topic, 1977)
Gaughan (Topic, 1978)
Handful of Earth (Topic, 1981)
A Different Kind of Love Song (Celtic Music, 1983)
Live in Edinburgh (Celtic Music, 1985)
True and Bold: Songs of the Scottish Miners (STUC, 1986)
Call It Freedom (Celtic Music, 1988)
Sail On (Greentrax, 1996)
Redwood Cathedral (Greentrax, 1998)
Outlaws and Dreamers (Greentrax, 2001)
Prentice Piece (Greentrax, 2002)
The Definitive Collection (High Point, 2006)
Lucky for Some (Greentrax, 2006)
Gaughan Live! at the Trades Club (Greentrax, 2008)

Share

Artist Profiles: Ryan Young

Ryan Young

Ryan Young was born October 27, 1990. He fell in love with the violin after watching Scottish music legend Aly Bain play.

Aged only 16 in 2007, Ryan is a fiddler from Cardross. A pupil at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSAMD Junior Academy, he was the winner of the Associated Board of Music Scholarship in 2005.

He was a finalist in the BBC Radio 2 Young Folk Musician Competition at the Union Chapel in London, and has twice been named as the Lomond Young Tradition Musician at the Balloch Folk Festival.

Discography:

Ryan Young (2017)

Share

Artist Profiles: Shona Mooney

Shona Mooney

Shona Mooney is originally from the Scottish Borders, born in 1984 near Linlithgow in Scotland. In 1999 and 2000 she reached the BBC Radio 2 Young Folk Award semi-final.

After reading a new course in folk and traditional music in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, she worked with other fiddlers from the Borders in a project called Borders Young Fiddles – promoting the traditional music of their area and combining it with their own compositions. Their CD was released in 2004.

Discography:

Heartsease (Foot Stompin’ Records, 2006)

Share

Artist Profiles: Mike Heron

Mike Heron, together with Robin Williamson and Clive Palmer, was a founder member of Edinburgh’s Incredible String Band. Formed in 1965, they soon broke from folk club beginnings and pioneered an eclectic, world music approach on such albums as The 5000 Spirits or the Layers of the Onion and The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter, which propelled them into the Top 5 of the British charts behind the Beatles, Cream and the Rolling Stones.

Incredible String Band produced over 14 seminal albums and appeared at the famous 1969 Woodstock Festival. Mike’s 1971 solo album Smiling Men with Bad Reputations featured a stellar cast from some of the most iconic folk, pop and rock musicians of the era, including Pete Townshend, Richard Thompson, Elton John, Jimmy Page, Steve Winwood, Keith Moon, Dave Pegg and Ronnie Lane.

The Incredible String Band, together with a dance troupe called Stone Monkey, went on to form a late-Sixties artistic community at Glen Row in the Scottish Borders and took in enthusiastic experiments with theater, film and a wide variety of musical approaches until their final incarnation as a six-piece folk-rock band.

Mike’s solo album Where the Mystics Swim revealed a songwriter pushing the boundaries, but retaining his originality, creativity and musical integrity.

Solo discography:

Smiling Men with Bad Reputations (Island Records, 1971)
Mike Heron’s Reputation (1975)
Diamond Of Dreams (1977)
Mike Heron ( Casablanca, 1979)
The Glen Row Tapes (1988)
Where the Mystics Swim (Strange Ways Records, 1996)
Conflict Of Emotions (Unique Gravity, 1998)
Futurefield (2002)
Echo Coming Back (2005)

Share