Tag Archives: oud

Artist Profiles: Naseer Shamma

Naseer Shamma

Naseer Shamma was born in 1963 in Kut, a village on the Tigris River in Iraq. He began studying the ud at the age of 12 in Baghdad, following in the footsteps of Jamil and Munir Bachir. When he was 11, Shamma saw the ud for the first time, in the hands of a stylish music teacher . Although Shamma’s father, a shop owner, was religiously conservative, he did not object to his son’s artistic ambitions. In 1985,

Shamma played his own compositions at his first concert, attended by several renowned Iraqi artists. At the time, he worked closely with “the emir of the ud,” the late Iraqi master Munir Bashir. But Shamma wanted to blaze his own path. Master Munir invented the technique of contemplation with oud, but I wanted my music to carry content, an idea or image that is shocking. He received his diploma from the Baghdad Academy of Music in 1987.

He began to teach ud after three years at the academy, as well as continuing his own studies. Shamma has composed music for films, plays and television, and has written a unique ud method for one hand – this is designed at for children injured during the Gulf War. Between 1993 and 1998 he taught ud the Higher Institute of Music in Tunisia, and in 1999 he took the post of Director of the Arab Center for the Ud in Cairo.

His compositions are culturally unique. He performs on the oud in a manner which combines ancient methods with his own modern compositions.

He has constructed an eight-string ud following the manuscript of the 9th century music theorist al-Farabi. This new design (8 instead of 6 strings) expanded the musical range of the ud and gave it a distinct tonality.

Discography:

Le Luth De Bagdad – The Baghdad Lute (Institut Du Monde Arabe, 1994)
Ishraq ‎(Musicaimmagine Records, 1996)
The Moon Fades (Incognito, 2004)
Meditation ‎(Diwan, 2004)
Ancient Dreams ‎(Meya Art Production, 2004)
Maqamat Ziryáb ‎(Pneuma, 2005)
Ard Al-Sawad ‎(2006)
Hilal ‎(Pneuma, 2006)
Viaje De Las Almas ‎(Pneuma, 2011)

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Artist Profiles: Fawzy Al-Aiedy

Fawzy Al-Aiedy

Fawzy Al-Aiedy is an Iraqi composer and multi-instrumetalist. He sings, plays ud (lute), oboe, and English horn. Born in Basra (Iraq) towards 1950, Fawzy studied at the Music Institute of Baghdad the oriental traditional music: lute and vocal, and also the occidental music: classic oboe.

In Paris, where he lives since 1971, after having obtained the 1st price of oboe and 2nd Price of chamber music, he turned towards more personal works; he is interested especially in musics which blend different cultures: all those which bring closer people, reflect a creativity, an emotion and make vibrate. He sings poetry mixing with his voice the secular and sacred, oral and written music. His knowledge of the Eastern and Western musics freed him from the rules to carry out his own spiritual and artistic search.

Discography:

Silence (Chant du monde, 1976)
Bagdad (Club du disque arabe, 1978)
Amina (Arc en Ciel, 1981)
La Terre (Arc en Ciel, 1983)
Scheherazade (Arc en Ciel, 1987)
Paris Bagdad (Barclay, 1990)
Tarab – Fawzy Al-Aiedy & l’Oriental jazz (Musiques en Balade, 1992)
Trobar E Tarab (1995)
Dounya (1998)
Le Paris Bagdad (Buda Musique, 1999)
Oud Aljazira (Buda Musique, 2000)
Noces-Bayna (Buda Musique, 2009)
Radio Bagdad (Institut du Monde Arabe, 2012)

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Artist Profiles: Omar Bashir

Omar Bashir

Omar Bashir carries on the tradition of his famed father, Munir Bashir, the preeminent ‘ud (lute) player and one of the world’s most esteemed cultural ambassadors for Arab music in the second half of the 20th century.

Omar Bashir was born in 1970 in Budapest, Hungary. He started playing the ‘ud at 5, next to his father, Munir Bashir, the Iraqi virtuoso who first made the oud a solo recital instrument and popularized it in the West. At 7, Omar Bashir joined the Baghdad Music and Ballet School. He would eventually become a teacher there and set up his own band of 24 musicians specializing in traditional Iraqi music. They performed regularly across Egypt, Russia, Turkey and many Arabic countries.

Bashir returned to Budapest in 1991 where he joined the Franz Liszt Academy. Bashir has performed as a solo artist and in duets with his father until Munir Bashir died in 1997 on the eve of a tour of North America. His music mixes traditional Arabic music, flamenco, blues and other forms with a jazz-like improvisation.

Bashir currently resides in Budapest.

Discography:

Music from Iraq (1992)
Duet of the Two Bashirs: Munir and Omar (1994)
From the Euphrates to the Danube (1997)
Ashwaq (1998)
My Memories (1998)
Flamenco Night (1998)
Al Andalus (1999)
Zikrayati (1999)
Live Solo Oud Performance (2000)
Sound of Civilizations (EMI, 2001)
To My Father (2002)
Bghdadiyat, with Shara Taha (2002)
Gypsy Oud ((2003)
Latin Oud (2004)
Oud Hawl al Alam – Oud Around the World (2004)
Crazy Oud (EMI, 2010)
The Platinum Collection (EMI, 2011)
Masters of Oud (EMI, 2010)
Takasim (Inedit Records, 2012)
The Legend Live Concert (Universal, 2015)

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Artist Profiles: Karim Baggili

Karim Baggili

Born in Belgium in 1976 with Jordanian and Yugoslavian origins, Karim Baggili, is a composer, self-taught guitarist and ud player.

He began playing the electric guitar at the age of 16. At 20, he started working the different techniques of the flamenco guitar and acquired an Arabic lute (ud) during one of his many trips to Jordan.

He participated in several projects: Ereska Trio, Colette, and a play. He worked with “L’Orchestre de Chambre de la Nathen”, and with singers for children like, Christian Merveille, Yvette Berger, Raphy Rapha?l…

In 2000, Karim won the first price of the “Open String Festival” in Osnabruck.

His first CD was released in 2002 and he took part in many CD recordings. He also composed the music of several documentaries and one short film.

Karim performed with groups like Traces and Turdus Philomelos. He also plays with jazz pianist Nathalie Loriers and takes part on stage and in studio with an English singer, Melanie Gabriel. He also performed with Philippe Lafontaine.

He brought together great musicians for his new band: Karim Baggili Quartet where he plays all his compositions inspired by flamenco music, South American rythms and one of his origins: Arabic music.

The Karim Baggili Quartet CD Cuatro con Cuatro was released at the beginning of December 2005 and will be followed by a tour in Belgium. Label: homerecords.

A solo CD, Douar was released in Germany mid-November 2005 by Acoustic Music Records. The release was followed by a tour of nine dates in several towns of Germany. The event was called “The International Guitar Night”.

Karim also performs often in solo or in duets with his percussionist Osvaldo Hernandez Napoles.

Aton Lua, another of his projects, is a mixture of rock and world music where he sings (in French, English, Spanish, Arabic and Serbo-Croatian) and plays the electric guitar, flamenco guitar and lute (ud).

Discography:

Douar (homerecords.be)
Cuatro con Cuatro (homerecords.be)
Lea & Kash (homerecords.be)
Kali City (homerecords.be)
Apollo You Sixteen (Take The Bus)
Apollo You Sixteen, Pt. 2 (Take The Bus)

website: www.karimbaggili.be

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Mehmet Polat Announces Ud Album ‘Ageless Garden’

Mehmet Polat – Ageless Garden

Mehmet Polat has announced the release of a new ud album titled Ageless Garden. “‘Music has been the best language with which to express my inner world for more than 30 years. And for the last 20 years, ud has been the main instrument on this journey. I composed these ten compositions during different phases of my life as a migrant musician. And I play them on this album through the lens of my vision of today.’

Guest musicians on the album include Alper Kekec (Turkey) on darbuka, daf and frame drums; Pasha Karami (Iran) on tombak; Shaho Andalibi (Iran) on ney; Yama Sarshar (Afghanistan) on tabla; and Zoumana Diarra (Mali) on kora.

Mehmet Polat will present the new album on February 21st, 2018 at 20.30 in Podium Mozaiek, Amsterdam.

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Deeply Mesmerizing Ud

Smadj – Solotronic (Whirling Wolf, 2017)

Solotronic is the new solo album by Smadj (Jean-Pierre Smadja), a French-Tunisian artist who has taken the ud (Arabic lute) to new realms. On Solotronic, Smadja delivers solo ud pieces where the lute appears in a calm acoustic form and fiery electric format as well. Smadj enhances the ud via electronic effects, using reverb, loops, and adding cutting edge electronic beats and ambient sounds at times.

Smadj’s Solotronica features a shape-shifting ud that is deeply mesmerizing, forward-looking and satisfying.

Buy the digital version of Solotronic

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Artist Profiles: Omar Sermini

Son of Cheikh Mohammed Sermini, Omar Sermini was born in Aleppo in Syria. He studied under the best of master musicians such as Abderahman Moudallal and Nadim Darwish. Omar worked in the field of invocations and enrolled at the Arab Music Institute where he learned to read music and play the ‘ud.

He has taken part in many Arabian festivals: Carthage and El Medina in Tunisia, the Festival de l’Independence in Algeria the Fes Festival in Morocco, the Maison de la Religion in Lebanon and in the Syrian Song Festival. He has also participated in international festivals notably in the Theatre de la Ville in France and in Sao Paulo Brazil.

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Music to Realize Peace

Rahim Alhaj – Letters from Iraq: Oud and String Quintet

Rahim Alhaj – Letters from Iraq: Oud and String Quintet (Smithsonian Folkways Recordings SFW40577, 2017)

Two ancient traditions meet on Letters from Iraq: Oud and String Quintet, western classical music and Arabic music. Oud (Arabic lute also known as ud) maestro Rahim Alhaj has been living in the United States for over a decade and return to Iraq in 2014 to learn about the current situation there.

Letters from Iraq is Alhaj’s expression of the emotions related with war-ravaged Iraq, stories of love, sadness and suffering. It’s a beautiful bittersweet album where the oud provides exquisite interaction with western classical music string instruments.

The lineup includes Rahim Alhaj on oud, David Felberg on violin; Ruxandra Marquardt on violin; Shanti Randall on viola; James Holland on cello; Jean-Luc Matton on bass viol; and Issa Maluff on percussion.

The CD physical version includes a 40-page booklet with photos, illustrations, and liner notes in English and Arabic.

Buy Letters from Iraq: Oud and String Quintet in the rest of the world

Buy Letters from Iraq: Oud and String Quintet in Europe

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Artist profiles: Haytham Safia

Haytham Safia

Haytham Safia, born in 1980, is an Arab-Israeli from Jerusalem. His passion for the Ud started at an early stage.

In 2001 he made his debut as a performer in The Netherlands where he acquired a firm position in the musical ensemble accompanying the Galili Dance Group; they toured throughout Europe.

In 2002 he graduated with distinction at the Academy of Music and Dance in Jerusalem. With Joshua Samson and Tony Overwater he performed at the Cultura Nova Festival in Heerlen September 2003. In February 24 he played as a soloist with the Holland Symphonia in the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam.

In November 2004 he participated in a workshop in the Rasa (Utrecht) for the Lute festival with another eight musicians from different nationalities.

Haytham Safia is in essence a classical Arabic musician but his compositions and music are influenced by other musical styles such as Persian, Balkan and jazz music.

He established his own group The Haytham Safia Quartet which consists of four musicians from different backgrounds: a Dutch, German and an African. The group performs Haytham’s original compositions that encompass both his performance experience and academic training while still true to his Arab roots.

Discography:

Fresh Moods

Kind of no blues

U’Duet

Hela Hela

No Complication

Lumen

Promises

Ya Dunya

Blossom

Farewell Shalabiye

DU’D

website: haythamsafia.com

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Artist Profiles: Badavi Zubayr

Badavi Zubayr, who sings and plays the ud, represents the urban tradition of the Hadramawt Valley (Yemen). Badavi composes his own melodies as much as he draws inspiration from the rich traditions of the Valley. He is influenced both by the old town’s culture as well as by the surrounding desert that his family comes from. Badavi is especially influenced by the tribal and Beduin tradition of Hadramawt. The tribesmen of the side valleys, like Dawcan, perform the dahifa, where two people dance in a circle, accompanied by mizmar, a double-reed clarinet or qasaba, a straight flute. The Beduin perform the miraikuz dance with hand-clapping and wooden castanets called maraqis.

Zubayr lives in the historical town of Shibam founded during the 9th century. It is also known as the “Manhattan of the desert”. The architecture of this town symbolizes the mixture between the pre-Islamic and Islamic cultures of Yemen

Mina Rad, a Paris-based journalist traveled all the way to Yemen to interview Zubayr. This is an account of her experience: “At the old port of Shibam, we asked a taxi driver about Badavi who proudly brought us to his beautiful house with two floors. There we found Badavi and his musicians. Badavi, a fifty year old man, with a brown face and a deep look, was surprised by the arrival of a journalist who came all the way from the West to find him, welcomed us very warmly. It was the afternoon, the time that the people of the desert get together to chew the qat (the special herb that has a relaxing effect). We were lucky, because Badavi was rehearsing with his musicians. He welcomed us in his big guesthouse, called in Yemenite Mafradj. A beautiful hall was surrounded by the small traditional wooden windows made by the hands of the artist himself. In such a warm atmosphere, Badavi and his group performed an unforgettable concert for us. Accompanied by a rhythmic sound of the waterpipe, while the musicians were chewing their qat, we discovered Badavi. Through his peaceful sound of ud and his deep voice, we entered to the magic world of the desert.

Ahmed Yaslam Khames Zubier, whose nickname is Badavi, which means the son of the desert, is one of the most popular singers in the valley of Hadramawt, in the South of Yemen. In his hometown, Shibam, with 4 inhabitants, he is considered as the king of the wedding ceremonies.

He was brought up in a family of musicians and carpenters. Since his childhood, he learned the family’s crafts and music from his father. The first instrument that he played was a mizmar (a kind of clarinet). Inspired by his sensibility for poetry, he started to compose poems. “I wanted so much to sing and play music, that is why I gave up the mizmar and learned ud”, with enthusiasm he explained “My life is summed up in my poetry and my music. I let my poetry be rhymed by the sound of my ud”.

At the age of twenty he formed his own group and made his first recording on cassette in 1973, when he was 23. His cassettes became very popular in the region. Since then he has produced dozens of them. Every driver in the desert, has one in his car. As said one of the drivers of a trolley, “the long roads of the desert become more joyful thanks to the melodies of the son of the desert.” The people of Hadramawt like not only his music but also his poetry that describes the everyday life of the Beduins, love and the feeling of being away from hometown.

Badavi is not only a musician but he also makes his own instruments. The originality of his music is based on the mixture between the happy melodies of the coast and the nostalgic ones of the desert. Even though the musical tendencies of the region are to modernize the music with western instruments, he remains faithful to the old tradition of Hadramawt. That’s why the Hadramawt people who emigrated to the Arabic gulf countries, very often invite him to the Gulf countries to sing for them at their weddings and bring them the melodies of the hometown.

Hassan al-Ajami is one of the last players of qanbus, a small lute with 4 strings. He represents the elegant tradition of Sana. He is the third generation of the qanbus player and singer. His peaceful melodies relate the sound of his ancestors from Iran to Yemen.

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