Category Archives: Music videos

Video of the Week: Orkestra Del Sol

Orkestra Del Sol - Photo by Jannica Honey
Global brass band Orkestra del Sol will release a new album April 18th titled Lung Capacity. To celebrate the occasion, the band has released a music video short throughout the globe.

Orkestra del Sol is known for its explosive reinvention of global brass band music, incorporating diverse influences such as ska, porro, calypso, klezmer and funk. Trumpet, trombone, saxes, clarinet, accordion, two drummers and the epic bass of the sousaphone conspire perfectly to create soaring horn lines and beautifully layered harmonies, driven by an uncompromising rhythm section .

Orkestra del Sol’s riotous live shows are full of wit and imagination – bursting with anarchic humor, wildly skilful musical arrangements and a roguish sense of theatre.

Orkestra Del Sol – This is Honkstep from Orkestra del Sol on Vimeo.

The Edinburgh-based 9-piece kicked off 2011 with a 23-show tour of Australia at the end of January, including a high profile season at Sydney International Art Festival.

Recordings available:

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Video of the Week: Tirso by Trance Untes

Trance Untes
Trance Untes is a Madrid-based band that plays dance music rhythms such as trance, house, techno and progressive through world music instruments. Trance Untes will be performing April 7th at Sala Taboó in Madrid at 22:30.

Trance Untes wants people to dance and reach a trance state using unconventional means and the global sounds of Africa, South America, Oceanía, Asia and Europe. The band does not use electronic instruments.

Band members include Salorian (harmonium, carcasheps, bass, doum doum and cowbell), El Cid (cavaquinho, sitar and electric guitar), Laguna (didjeridu and drums), Ain (pandeiro, zambomba and birimbao) and Rebecca (vocals).

Sala Taboo is located at Calle San Vicente Ferrer 23.
Tickets: 7€

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Video of the Week: Sanam Marvi’s Manzil-e-Sufi

Sanam Marvi, courtesy of Coke Studio
This week’s video features Sanam Marvi, the superb Pakistani folk and Sufi singer. At her young age she is considered among the finest performers in the Sufi, ghazal and folk genres.

She trained under her father Fakir Ghulam Rasool, and later with Ustad Fateh Ali Khan of the Gwalior gharana (school). She studied Sufi poetry extensively and is deeply influenced by this genre because of its messages of love and peace.

She became popular after her live performance at Coke Studio, a Pakistani television series featuring cutting edge live music performances.

Sanam Marvi sings compositions of Baba Bulleh Shah; Baba Sheikh Fari; Sachal Sarmast, the Sufi mystic from Sindh; and Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai, who is one of the greatest poets of the Sindhi language.

She recently performed at the du World Music Festival in Dubai

Watch her superb performance of Manzil-e-Sufi at the Coke Studio:

Recordings available: Best of Sanam Marvi (MP3)

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Video of the Week: Playing For Change’s Redemption Song Video

Playing For Change - Songs Around The World, Part 2
With the approval and support of the Marley Estate, Playing For Change sought to create a truly global recording of Bob Marley‘s “Redemption Song.” The stunning video includes Japanese musician Hiromitsu Agatsuma on shamisen, Congolese guitarist Jason Tamba, Congolese vocalist Mermans Kenkosenki and vocalist Stephen Marley.

The video is an introduction to the upcoming release of Playing For Change – Songs Around The World Part 2 (Hear Music/Concord Music Group) on May 31st, 2011. By filming and recording dozens of musicians from around the world, filmmaker, producer and PFC founder, Mark Johnson captures stunning musical collaborations that seamlessly blend diverse styles of music into powerful performances.

Playing For Change – Songs Around The World Part 2 expands on the journey that made Playing For Change one of 2009’s most unusual cultural phenomenons. The 2-disc CD/DVD package is a global mix of cultures and rhythms featuring original songs written for the album, as well as reinterpretations of internationally loved recordings including Bob Marley‘s “Redemption Song,” Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground” and John Lennon’s “Imagine.”

Playing For Change caught the public’s awareness in 2009 when their version of the song “Stand By Me” accumulated over 30 million views on YouTube. Johnson and his crew mixed the performances of 18 street musicians, a South African Choir and a Native American drum group into a clip that went viral on the Internet after Johnson appeared on PBS’ Bill Moyers’ Journal. “Stand by Me” laid the foundation for the best selling CD/DVD set Playing for Change: Songs Around The World, which debuted at #10 on Billboard’s Pop Chart in April of 2009.

Baaba Maal participates in the album with an arrangement of Bob Marley‘s “Three Little Birds” - Photo by Tyrone Le Bon
In 2008 Playing For Change entered into a joint venture with Concord Music Group through the support of label co-owner, entertainment legend Norman Lear and Concord Music Group chief creative officer John Burk. The hard work and perseverance of Concord Music Group’s team has played an essential role in the Playing For Change story, powering the effort to bring PFC’s vision and inspiration to fruition.

The true measure of any movement is what it gives back to the people. The Playing For Change Foundation embodies this and works toward building, maintaining and connecting music schools across the globe.

The Foundation’s first project, the Ntonga Music School in South Africa, opened in 2009. In addition, The Foundation has opened three music schools in Nepal as well as schools in Ghana, Mali and Rwanda, with more in the planning stages. To create links between the schools, Playing For Change is working with engineers from NASA. They want to offer third world countries the ability to connect with the outside world through the Internet.

We recently went to MIT in Boston with NASA engineers,” Johnson says. “We had Boston high school music students connect in real time with kids in our school in South Africa. They were performing and interacting with each other and, at the end of the session, they were in love with each other. All prejudice was wiped away. That’s the motivation behind the PFC Foundation.”

Songs Around The World, Part 2” is a continuation and evolution of our desire to present music to inspire the world,” Johnson says. “The journey of this album takes us from a village in Mali to the favelas (slums) of Brazil, from New Orleans to India, Jamaica to Japan. We stopped in 15 countries and recorded more than 150 musicians. The quality of our technology has improved. It sounds and looks better.”

The music on Songs Part 2 is truly global, a dizzying mix of styles, cultures and rhythms. Baaba Maal‘s arrangement of Bob Marley‘s “Three Little Birds” has an African groove that’s complimented by rhythms from eight Brazilian percussionists, Keb’ Mo’s Delta blues guitar, trap drummer Courtney “Bam” Diedrick’s reggae backbeat and D. Chandrajit’s tabla. Tinariwen, a band of musicians from the deserts of Northern Mali, play a kind of music that incorporates American blues, African rhythms and Tuareg folk music. They provide the driving pulse for Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground” and their own “Groove in G,” an improvisation that features Ag Alhabib’s electric guitar, Hiromitsu Agatsuma’s shamisen and a dozen Indian, African, Jamaican and Brazilian drummers and percussionists as well as subtle improvisations from sitar, veena and sarod players.

The recording also features a performance from The Wailers’ last European tour along with a click track using Bob Marley‘s vocal.

Recordings: Playing for Change LivePlaying for Change: Songs Around The World

Buy Playing For Change – Songs Around The World Part 2

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Video of the Week: Easy Come, Easy Go by Sierra Hull

Sierra Hull
Mandolin sensation Sierra Hull has released “Easy Come, Easy Go,” the video for the single from her new album Daybreak. The video was directed by award David McClister (Lady Antebellum, Dierks Bentley, Leann Rimes) and was filmed in one day at the Two Rivers Mansion in Nashville. It features her touring band called Highway 111.

Daybreak was produced by Union Station’s bassist, Barry Bales. It features some of the best singers and players in the contemporary bluegrass scene. This is Sierra Hull‘s follow-up to 2008’s Secrets.

Sierra Hull is a bluegrass singer, songwriter, and virtuoso mandolin player. The 19 year old musician has become one of the sensations in the bluegrass world. She is in her final year at Berklee College of Music where she is the first bluegrass artist to be awarded Berklee’s Presidential Scholarship. This prestigious award is given to only 5 students out of thousands of applicants. It includes tuition, school fees, and room and board.

Recordings available:

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Video of the Week Sleepy Maggie by Ashley MacIsaac

Ashley MacIsaac
As an appetizer before Saint Patrick’s Day, this week we present this classic video by Ashley MacIsaac. The groundbreaking ‘Sleepy Maggie’ brought together the groundbreaking sounds of Celtic music and electronica.

Cape Breton fiddler Ashley McIsaac is joined by the lovely Scottish Gaelic vocals of Mary Jae Lamond, one of the great voices in Canadian Celtic music. The hit single ‘Sleepy Maggie’ was included in the album Hi  How Are You Today?, released in 1995.

When Ashley Maclsaac burst on the worldwide scene with 1995’s Hi  How Are You Today?

Recordings available:

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Video of the Week: El Puchero del Hortelano Presents Ave Fénix

El Puchero del Hortelano
Ave Fénix” is the second single and music video by Granada-based El Puchero del Hortelano. The group combines flamenco, alternative rock and global beats. Their latest album was released three months ago.

“Ave Fénix” is one of El Puchero del Hortelano’s most popular pieces.

The music video was directed by Argentine photographer Ernesto Oehler. He took the band to an abandoned gold mine in the middle of the desert, where he shot the video. Madrid-based Pablo Bertrán edited the videoclip.

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Sufi Sensation Sanam Marvi to perform at du World Music Festival

Sanam Marvi, courtesy of Coke Studio
Sanam Marvi is an outstanding Pakistani folk and Sufi singer and at her young age she is considered among the finest performers in the Sufi, ghazal and folk genres.

She trained under her father Fakir Ghulam Rasool, and later with Ustad Fateh Ali Khan of the Gwalior gharana (school). She studied Sufi poetry extensively and is deeply influenced by this genre because of its messages of love and peace.

She became popular after her live performance at Coke Studio, a Pakistani television series featuring cutting edge live music performances.

Sanam Marvi sings compositions of Baba Bulleh Shah; Baba Sheikh Fari; Sachal Sarmast, the Sufi mystic from Sindh; and Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai, who is one of the greatest poets of the Sindhi language.

She will be performing tomorrow and March 1st at the du World Music Festival in Dubai

The Walk, JBR – 28 February, 8:30 pm – 9:30 pm
The Burj Steps, Downtown Dubai – 1 March, 9:45 pm – 11:00 pm

Watch her superb performance at the Coke Studio:

Recordings available: Best of Sanam Marvi (MP3)

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Video of the Week: Manolito Simonet y su Trabuco Presents La Habana Me Llama

Manolito Simonet
Manolito Simonet y su Trabuco, one of the hottest bands form Cuba, made this video titled v (Havana is Calling Me).

Founded on February 25, 1993, Manolito y su Trabuco was one of the first Cuban timba bands, but it wasn’t until the second wave, in 1995, that they released their first album, Directo al corazón.

In 2006, about to release their 7th album, Hablando en serio, they enjoyed a gradual and steady rise in popularity and are now generally considered to be among the top three or four true timba bands in Havana.

Recordings available:

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Syria-born singer Saadi Releases Lights Up NY Video

Saadi - Photo by Alberto Milazzo
Syrian hip-hop/electro/dancehall singer Saadi has released a new single called “Lights Up NYC,” a collaboration with Sierra Leonian rapper Bajah (from Bajah + the Dry Eye Crew)

According to Saadi, “Lights Up NYC” deals with the relationship every artist has with the struggle to live and create in New York City. It was inspired by Pupa Bajah’s story of coming to New York with the Dry Eye Crew from Sierra Leone.

Bajah and Boshra Saadimet at an Antibalas show in Brooklyn, immediately went back to Saadi’s studio in the East Village and “Lights Up NYC” was born.

Boshra al Saadi was born in Syria, sojourned in suburban Pennsylvania for a spin in Catholic school, ventured to New York City’s Greenwich Village in her late teens with folksinger dreams, and cut her teeth as co-frontwoman for indie rock band Looker, before setting out on her own.

Saadi’s new material will all be released via Dither Down, a new label based in Brooklyn that was started up by Tim Wagner and Benny Lowe of 33Hz along with DJ Chicus of the reggae label, Redbud Records. The label is centered around their love of indie pop, disco, dub, 80s electro and house and it focuses on releases from up and coming New York artists.

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