All posts by Daryana Antipova

Daryana Antipova has been working as a journalist since 2001 and is involved in radio (Scythian horn program), print (The Moscow News, Russia Beyond the Headlines, Fanograf) and online media related to world music. Drummer in Vedan Kolod folk band, director at Scythian horn agency and label. Her main focus is on traditional folk music, Siberian music and Russian world music in general.

Second World Music Networking Conference Held in Russia

Tavrida Art festival – Photo by by Anna Sadovnikova

The biggest Russian festival Tavrida Art hosted Russian Ethno-Music Conference MusiConnect Russia — the second five-day showcase conference of its kind held in Russia.

Tavrida Art festival – Photo by by Anna Sadovnikova

The gathering was aimed at the development of the Russian ethno-music (world music) industry and organized by Daryana Antipova and Alyona Minulina.

Danya Voronkov – Photo by by Anna Sadovnikova

The conference took place during August 21 — 26, 2019 and it brought together 12 directors of ethnic (world music) festivals in Russia and one special guest from Hungary.

Vera Kondratieva – Photo by by Anna Sadovnikova

The participants included: Mikhail Chashchin of Festival Heaven and Earth (Tyumen); journalist Emil Biljarski of the Hungarian Ritmus és hang (Budapest); Natalia Ulanova of the international festival Voice of Nomads» (Ulan-Ude); Marina Gulyaeva of Kupalskaya skazka festival (Moscow); Daryana Antipova, co-director of the Russian World Music Awards (Moscow); Stanislav Drozdov, former director of the international festival Folk Summer Fest (Sevastopol); Ilya Shkurinsky of festival White Noise (Petrozavodsk); Irina Shuvalova of the the creative bureau Selsovet (Moscow), Yuri Pavlov of WAFest festival (Nizhny Novgorod), Irina Palekhova of Alatyr festival (Yekaterinburg), Alexei Polyakov of Call of Parma festival (Perm), and Olga Sitnikova of Protoka (Samara).

Festival directors – Photo by by Anna Sadovnikova

Tavrida Narodnaya is a compilation CD of the best musicians presented at the showcase festival. Festival directors listened to more than 25 participants who applied to perform and were chosen among 50 applicants. All musicians are under 35 years old. If you want to get more information about these projects please contact the compiler and showcase organizer Daryana Antipova (scythianhorn@gmail.com)

Zoya Strekalovskaya

Four groups were chosen to participate at the festivals:

Staritsa from Belgorod is going to play at Kupalskaya skazka» festival in 2010; Volya from Voronezh to participate at WAFest festival in 2020; Zoya Strekalovskaya from Yakutsk will go to Nebo i Zemlya festival in 2020; and Daniil (Danya) Voronkov from Moscow is going to perform at Voice of Nomads festival in 2020.

Festival directors meeting – Photo by by Anna Sadovnikova
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Russian World Music Awards 2018 Ceremony

Kedr folk band from Novosibirsk – Photo by Jora PhR

On December 8th, 2018, the Alexey Kozlov club hosted the solemn presentation of the first Russian prize in the field of ethnic music, the Russian World Music Awards.

On two stages at the same time there were such groups as: Khoomei Beat from the Republic of Tuva, Abstaktor from Voronezh, a young project Beneath the skies from Moscow, Unknown Composer from Arkhangelsk, and Taisia Krasnopevtseva from Moscow.

The winner of the 2017 Award, Seven Eight Band, closed the festival. A special guest was the master of Russian folk Sergey Starostin.

The Russian World Music Awards is the first professional award in Russia in the field of ethnic music. This year, 90 musical groups from 27 cities were presented to the jury in the following categories: Best ethnic project, Best authentic project, Best experimental project, Best new ethnic project, Best music journalist and Audience award. Voting was held with 12 judges, consisting of experts in the field of ethnic music from 9 countries.

Jury 2018: Andrey Klyukin — festival director Wild Mint, Russia; Roger Short — BBC Radio3, England; Arthur Rozhek — OFF Festival, Poland; Vadim Ponomarev — Russian journalist; Natasha Podobed — More Zvukov Agency, Germany; Kirill Kuzmin — Aga Khan music (AKMI), Switzerland; Vladimir Potanchok — FM Hudba Sveta, Slovakia; Nick Hobbs — Charmenko agency, Turkey; Peter Doruzka — journalist, Czech Republic; Marina Ivanenko — head of music business and entertainment Management Department, RMA, Russia; Maria Semushkina — Usadba Jazz, Russia; Jahangir Selimkhanov — member of the European Cultural Parliament, expert on cultural policy, Azerbaijan.

Organizers of RWMA: Natalia Myazina, Daryana Antipova and Yuri Romanov – Photo by Jora PhR

For three years now, founders of the Russian World Music Awards , Natalia Myazina and Daryana Antipova, have been supporting and motivating professional musicians whose work does not fit into the modern standard of popular music, but draws inspiration from the deep traditions of Russian ethnic culture.

The mission of the award is the development of world and ethnic music in Russia and abroad, improving the image of Russia in the modern world, and fostering good international ties, by promoting its rich and vibrant Culture, Music, History and Art.

Winners of Russian World music Awards 2018:


Best ethno project — Alash, Republic of Tuva

Maria Arkhipova from Arkona band gives awards to Alash band – Photo by Jora PhR

Best experimental ethno project — Khoomei Beat, Republic of Tuva

Khoomei Beat performance at RWMA – Photo by Jora PhR

Best authentic project — Drowned Songs Project, Irkutsk

Andrei Kotov gives awards to “Drowned songs” project from Irkutsk – Photo by Jora PhR

Best new project — Abstractor, Voronezh

Inna Zhelannaya gives awards to Abstraktor – Photo by Jora PhR

Best young project — Beneath the skies, Moscow

Academy gives prize to Beneath the skies project – Photo by Jora PhR

Sergey Starostin and “Beneath the skies” project – Photo by Jora PhR

Best journalist — Lev Belyakov, Moscow Folk Room radio program

Vladimir Potanchok from FM Hudba Sveta, Slovakia gives awards to Lev Belyakov, best ethno journalist

For contribution to the development of ethnic music in Russia — Ivan Kupala, St. Petersburg

Ivan Kupala – Photo by Jora PhR

Listeners choice – Unknown Composer, Arkhangelsk

You can watch the whole ceremony here:

More at: worldmusicawards.ru

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First World Music Networking Conference Held in Russia, a Success

The Kamwa International Ethno-Music Conference was the first three-day conference of its kind held in Russia. The gathering was aimed at the development of the Russian ethno-music (world music) industry and organized by the Kamwa festival, Natalia Shostina and Daryana Antipova.

The conference included a series of round tables on current topics of the ethno-music industry such as “Features of ethnic festival organization in Russia. The best form of legal registration for festivals”, “Folk Music Industry in Russia” and others. The main goal of the event was to foster professional industry partnerships, business contacts, opportunities for exporting Russian ethnic music, and international cooperation.


Kamwa International Ethno-Music Conference 2018

 

The conference took place during July 27 – 29, 2018 at the grounds of the Architectural and Ethnographic Khokhlovka Museum, located 40 km from Perm on the picturesque banks of the Kama River. It brought together directors of ethnic festivals in Russia, managers working with world music groups, tour agents, representatives of ethnic labels and journalists ranging from Siberia and Moscow to France and Hungary.

 


Tatiana Fokina (Nebo i Zemlya festival), Tatiana Lambolez (Altan Art agency, France), Marina Gulyaeva (Kupalskaya skazka festival, Moscow), Denis Davydov (Myrkr label, Ekaterinburg), Emil Bilyarski, Daryana Antipova, Glafira Utyomova and Angelina Abdulova at Kamwa International Ethno-Music Conference 2018

 

Denis Davydov of the Myrkr record label in Ekaterinburg said: “I am very glad that I was able to take part in the Kamwa ethno-music conference. It was a new and useful professional experience for me. Finally in Russia there is a platform where you can meet and talk with the organizers of ethno – and folklore festivals, representatives of groups, publishers and journalists. I hope that the conference will be an annual one. Thanks to its organizers, and, in particular, Daryana Antipova and Natalia Shostina for the invitation“.

Tatiana Lambolez of booking agency Altan-Art (France) expressed: “The atmosphere was wonderful at the conference. We had interesting topics for discussion and all members actively participated, which is important. The Kamwa festival itself is wonderful, with a very rich and varied program in a wonderful place and nature. I enjoyed the full program and the choice of artists as well as communicating with conference participants and organizers. Thank you!

More at www.kamwa.ru

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The First World Music Networking Conference to Be Held in Russia in July 2018

Kamwa international world music conference is the first three-day conference in Russia, aimed at the development of Russian ethno-music industry, and organized by Kamwa festival. The gathering will take place on July 27 – 29, 2018.

The conference will include a series of round tables and lectures on current topics of the world music industry such as “Features of the ethnic festivals organization in Russia. The best form of legal registration for the festival”, “How to promote your folk group abroad?”, “Music folk industry in Russia” and others.

Main aim of work: professional industry partnership, business contacts, opportunities for Russian ethnic music export, international cooperation. The conference will take place on the territory of the architectural and ethnographic Khokhlovka museum, located 40 km from Perm (Ural region) on the picturesque banks of Kama river, and will bring together the leading directors of ethnic festivals in Russia, managers of clubs working with world music groups, tour agents, representatives of ethnic labels and journalists.

Participants: the organizer of the Tyumen festival “Nebo I Zemya” Tatiana Fokina; director of the French art-agency “Altan-Art” Tatiana Lambolez; host of radio program “Folk Room” in “Svoyo radio” and director of the music label “FireStorm Production” Lev Belyakov from Moscow; musician of the group Meszecsinka and curator of the Hungarian ethno festival Babel Sound Emil Bilyarsky; director of the international festival “Voice of nomads” Natalia Ulanova (Ulan-Ude); director of the Novosibirsk festival “WhatEthno” Yuri Romanov; director of the ethno-festival “Midsummer tale” Marina Gulyaeva; co-director of the Russian World Music Awards Daryana Antipova from Moscow; director of the international Kamwa festival Natalya Shostina (Perm); art directors of the Orenburg promo-group “Wonderland” Iskander Marat and Milakova Alexander; and director of the music label “Myrkr” from Ekaterinburg Denis Davydov.

More at www.facebook.com/KAMWAfestival

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Russian Summer Ethno Festivals 2018

There are not so many ethnic [folk or world music] festivals in Russia. Most of those I wrote about a year ago do not exist or will be held every two years, like the Taibola Festival and White Noise, skipping 2018. Also, many have not yet published their promo with the line-up announcement 2018, but it doesn’t prevent people from planning their trips and buying tickets in advance.

Kamwa festival
27 – 29 of July, Perm region

Kamwa festival celebrates 13 years old this year, and this was the first ethno festival I attended in my life 13 years ago. I always compare other festivals I go to with Kamwa. The festival is held in an unrealistically picturesque place – in the museum of wooden architecture of Khokhlovka, a few kilometers from Perm. All Russian ethno-musicians and many foreign ones performed here, for example, Trad.Attack!, Oratnitza, Vedan Kolod, Merema, Sattuma, Namgar, Volga, Kila, Authentic Light Orchestra and many-many others.

 

Wild mint
9 – 11 of June, Tula region

The biggest multi-genre festival of Russia. This year more than 70 bands from around the world will perform within 3 days on Wild Mint: Mgzavrebi, Mujuice, OLIGARKH, Aveva, but not so many folk bands as before.

 

Folk Summer Fest
20 – 22 of July, Kaluga region

Saltatio Mortis, The Rumjacks, Russkaja, Heidevolk, Kalevala, Spire, Teufelstans, Nytt Land, Gilead, Midvinterblot, and more than 50 other bands from all over the world mostly playing pagan metal or Viking folk.

 

Nebo I Zemlya
8 – 12 of June, Tyumen

There you’ll be able to participate at 700 master classes, to listen to over 200 invited speakers with lectures on health, relationships, needlework, business, cultures from all over the world, 400 events for children, 50 concerts Russian and foreign artists; Holi holiday, fire shows and many other things.

 

WAFEst
1 – 5 of August, Nizhni Novgorod

WAFEst – this is Water-Air-Fire-Earth-festival! This is not a purely musical festival – there are fire shows, master classes, the quality and quantity (more than 400!) are unprecedented, so you can call it educational too.

 

Mir Sibiri
13 – 15 of July, Shushenskoe

Since 2003, Shushenskoye has become a place of unprecedented musical, ethnic, cultural leisure for thousands and thousands of guests, whose number and geography increases every year. The first name of this festival was Sayan Ring, later changed into Mir Sibiri, now the biggest ethno festival in Russia.

 

What Etno
19 – 22 of July, Altai

International EcoCultural festival WhatEtno it is three-day event, consisting educational and cognitive meetings dedicated to world music, festival also organizes tours for musicians in Siberia.

 

Ustuu-Huree
18 – 22 of July, Republic Tuva

XIX International Festival of Live Music and Faith “Ustuu-Huree -2018” will be held in Chadan of the Republic of Tuva from 18 to 22 July. Festival was established in 1999, during the realization of the idea of restoring the ruins of the once magnificent Buddhist temple Ustuu-Huree.

 

Tamga
24 – 26 of August, Bashkortostan

This is the chance also to visit one of the biggest (and almost endless) lakes in Bashkortostan, the lake Aslykul. There is no entrance fee, the festival made by volunteers and enthusiasts. Tribal mood and a lot of beautiful fire shows with live folk and electronic music.

 

Solar Systo Togathering 2018
17 – 21 of May, Saint-Petersburg

Quite small and private festival that annually changes its location. This year, the “ecological meeting” Solar Systo Togathering took place on the picturesque shore of the Finnish Gulf, 120 kilometers from St. Petersburg towards Primorsk. This year’s headline includes Ikarushka, Testo, Noid and many other folk-electronic projects.

 

Voice of nomads
20 – 21 of July, Buryatia Republic

International Music Festival near Baikal lake. Invites local stars like Namgar as well as International world music stars like Casuarina from Brazil, the bands from Mongolia, China, Ukraine, Hungary, Norway, USA, Japan, Belgium, Brazil, Zimbabwe, France come there regularly.

Headline photo: Kamwa festival

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Interview with Merema — the winners of Russian World Music Awards 2017

Daryana Antipova: Hi Katya, we have known each other since the Kamwa Festival in 2005 when you performed with another folk band. How old is Merema?

Ekaterina Modina: Merema was created in 2010. We called it a folklore ensemble first, and it turned into an ethnographic folklore studio in 2014. We sing Erzyan and Mokshan song and recreate folk rites on the stage. We go on ethnographic expeditions to villages and record and release albums. We are engaged in collecting and preserving folklore. “Merema” means “a story, a legend” in the Erzyan language.

Daryana Antipova: Tell us a little more about the Mordovian culture- how many people in Mordovia still speak their native language?

Ekaterina Modina: Almost no one speaks our national language any more. Basically, this language is preserved in the villages of the districts of the Republic of Mordovia. Maybe there are many more of us than is officially confirmed but the Erzyans and the Mokshaans are disappearing. During the population census, people are embarrassed to say they are Erzyan or Mokshanin- they prefer to say they are Russians.

 

Merema

 

Daryana Antipova: Oh, that’s sad. It seems to me that the young generation, especially children, do not understand folk music at all…

Ekaterina Modina: We invite children to our children’s studio and a children’s ensemble. There is an amateur ensemble and there is a professional ensemble for old Mordovian songs, “Moroma”. We perform in kindergartens and in schools. Of course, it’s hard to compare and compete with modern genres in music. But if kids get to know their native ancient culture from a young age, culture becomes a part of their life. And yes, it is becoming more and more difficult to attract young people. Teenagers don’t come to our concerts anymore. Our audience is adults who have already formed their own interests. Some of them come from the village and still remember living traditions.

People in Mordovia don’t understand their own culture, because it is incomprehensible to them. The songs are strange and unfamiliar, and they don’t speak this forgotten language. But they still have a unique opportunity to listen to ancient, prolonged polyphonic singing. The songs are original and not everyone likes them, because we have a lot of dissonant chords. In our culture, we sound more like singing traditions in Georgia and southern Russia.

 

Merema at Russian World Music Awards 2017

 

Daryana Antipova: How can we attract people to authentic folklore, if it does not exist on Russian television?

Ekaterina Modina: People are not ready for this. Not everyone can understand the beauty of multi-voiced lyrical songs. We usually combine our shows with the theatre. It all depends on how you present this folklore. Make it tasty. As a collector and a connoisseur I can listen to grandmothers all day long. We go to villages in different regions of the Republic of Mordovia. I made an agreement with our local TV channel 10, and they now travel with us and film the program “The Tradition of Antiquity”. I first go on an expedition, record, watch and listen. It’s so nice and amazing, it’s not possible to convey in words, you just need to be there. This program is shown all over Mordovia. When I come to the village, maybe I can find just one song, but for the sake of this song it is worthwhile to come there and spend a few days.

Daryana Antipova: What instruments do you use in Merema?

Ekaterina Modina: In our work we use household tools — uhvat, pechnaya zaslonka, rubel (traditional Russian kitchen implements). We have our own national drum, but at the moment we have not received any support to order and have it produced. It turned out to be easier to go to the store and buy an African drum than to make our traditional one. We are not proud of this. We also play our traditional, very capricious instrument — “nyudi”. No one plays it nowadays. We have restored it and managed to have an older person show us how to play it. The tool is very impractical. It manages to play for only five minutes. Because the “tongue” is very wet, the instrument shifts tonally.

Also we are actively engaged in traditional costumes. As you can see in our photos and videos, all the costumes are authentic; we do not alter them. If you do not show costumes and do not popularize them now, then they will be completely lost and will remain only in textbooks. To fully understand the culture, you must not only hear, but still see and, perhaps, feel culture.

The Erzyan outfit consists of a bottom shirt — a ”panar” and a top robe — “rutya”. Female amulets (“pulays”) are very important in our culture. The word “Pulax” is translated as a tail. This is a woolen floor skirt, which is tied at the front. “Syulgam”, according to traditional beliefs, protects the female breast, which feeds the new generation. The Erzyans were pagans, very superstitious people, so every Erzyan wore an amulet everywhere. The bells were hung on ”pulays”, since it was believed that the ringing repelled evil spirits. They even said that you hear a Mordovian girl first, and then you see her.

Our costumes are very different from all others, even from Udmurts and Mari, Finns and Estonians. Although we are one group, we have very different costumes.

 

Ekaterina Modina (Merema)

 

Daryana Antipova: In Russia, there is little support for folk culture. How do you continue your work?

Ekaterina Modina: People come and leave my ensemble due to life circumstances or because of the low pay for culture in general. People work on their own initiative- no one would have stayed in this system if they had not been so keen on culture, folk traditions. I myself still teach at the university. During their studies, students are satisfied with their salary in ensemble, but when they graduate and receive a diploma, they don’t earn enough to provide for their family. I myself have a family and three children, so I have to work other jobs so that I can do what I love and at the same time have something to live on. This is very sad. I would like to devote myself entirely to one pursuit.

During these seven years “Merema” changed several times. Now we have six people, but one will enter the army soon. It’s also kind of difficult to find new people for our kids ensemble. The Mordovian government pays more attention to sports, and it’s important for kids to be physically fit. Mordovia is famous for athletics- we have a good sport school and kids are eager to get into it. Even my son has recently joined the football team. I tell him that he will not be able to get by on folk singing, so he should just think of it as a favorite hobby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Granddaughter’s Notes

Zuzanna Malisz

 

One of the WOMEX highlights in Poland this year was for sure the opening performance of Kapela Maliszów, a family band from Poland, including the multi-instrumentalist Jan Malisz and his children, Kasper and Zuzanna. As said on the band’s official site, Jan Malisz got most of the instruments from his father, Jozef so the band called their music “Father’s notes.” I so rarely meet female drummers in Eastern Europe, especially in folk music, so from the first second I decided to talk with Zuzanna.

 

Kapela Maliszów

 

Daryana: Ok, first of all of course I would love to know your personal story of becoming a musician — how and why did you start playing, singing, which instruments and so on?

Zuzanna: I think my story has begun when I came up to this world. It’s a generational thing, my grandparents were musicians, and lots of my family members still are. They aren’t educated musicians, they are just people who love music. So, with so much genes and family I think I couldn’t have a choice… could I? I mean, of course I did but music is something that grew up with me, has been with me since I was born, and I didn’t even realize how much I was soaked by it, how much it affects my life.

 

 

My first serious instrument was piano. I went to a music school as an 8 years old child, and, it would be worth mentioning, that a music school had a huge influence on my adventure with music (and it still has). I’ve met teachers that taught me a lot, made me love classical music.

I’m not sure about singing, I believe that I started singing right after I learned how to speak. But 2-3 years ago, I started being interested how to sing properly, and, again, music school, and choir that I have been going to, has helped me to learn technical stuff.

 

 

What kind of percussion do you play? Is it a totally traditional way of playing? Does this drumming and percussion tradition exist in old folklore? Is the number of girls playing drums growing or spreading in Polish folk tradition?

Zuzanna: The drums I play are traditional polish drums called baraban (the big one) and bęben obręczowy (the small one). My way of playing is based primarily on improvisation. It’s obvious that the rhythm must be preserved but except that (and some parts in our compositions which I always play the same) the only limit is my imagination.

I always try to play to my brother and improvise with him. I can’t tell if it’s traditional way of playing, I think that in the past there also were several madmen that broke down the rhythm in every possible way… but perceived as more accurate and traditional is playing simpler and without so many wonders. The way of drumming depends on what region you play in, because it can be a little different in different regions. When I started playing drums, I listened to drummers from central Poland, so if you hear central-drumming-style in my playing, maybe that’s why.

Traditional drumming, as a traditional music was dying out few years ago, but now, fortunately, there are many young people who are interested in it, and want to resurrect it. There are also some girls that play drum pretty well and I often meet them at festivals like Wszystkie Mazurki Świata. Regarding women drummers from Eastern Europe, I don’t know any, but I hope that it’ll change soon. In general and apart from percussion I play piano, drum, sometimes trying to play guitar, I can also play on traditional Polish cello.

 

 

Why folklore? Don’t you plan to try out some other genres?

Zuzanna: Folk and traditional music have always been in our house. My parents always listened to it, and played it so I think they had a big influence on it. It wasn’t like one day we decided to play traditional music. The traditions chose us, and we had to continue it. Everything came naturally.

But, of course I listen to a lot of different genres! Jazz, indie pop, pop, rock, folk from different countries like Ireland or Bulgaria and a lot of others styles. I love listening to blues, soul, jazz, R&B singers and singing it. And, who knows, maybe this is what my future will be about. I wish it would.

 

Zuzanna Malisz

 

What’s special in working in a family group?

Zuzanna: Probably the best thing about a family band is that we all live in the same place, so we can play whenever we want.

Once, at attempt, we got angry at each other, and we were arguing a lot. And then, Kacper started to play a random melody, improvisation. With all of those emotions, we made a new song.

 

 

Please tell about your repertoire and what are your favorite songs?

Zuzanna: We mostly play our compositions, based on tradition. There are some traditional songs that we changed a little bit. All of our compositions are unique and have a nice story behind it, but my favorite is “Chodzony od Józefa” (Kacper’s composition), which is played on our grandfather’s violin. It was broken by a horse, and after grandfather’s death, our dad fixed it.

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Winners of The 2nd Annual Russian World Music Awards Announced

Best World Music Band – Seven Eight Band
Experimental Award – Nadishana
Best Authentic Band – Merema
Newcomer Award – Karelia
Best Video – Otava Yo
World Music Legend – Sergey Starostin
Audience prize – Gilead
Contributions to world music – Theodor Bastard

The 2nd Annual Russian World Music Awards were held on Thursday, November 23rd at the Moscow’s Central House of Artists in Moscow, Russia. Shaman Nikolay Oorzhak from Tuva opened the ceremony with a traditional prayer.

 

Nikolay Oorzhak

 

Russian musicians are rarely present on the world music scene so this project is created to change this situation. On the Awards’ social media page vk.com/russianworldmusicawards you can listen to all the tracks from nominees for free.

Our ceremony in Moscow on November 23rd was very successful. It gathered lots of musicians, directors of all the main world music festivals of Russia (Andrei Klukin from Wild Mint festival in Moscow, Natalia Shostina – director of Kamwa festival from Perm and Yuri Romanov – WhatEthno festival director from Novosibirsk), and many fans of Russian culture. It was a please to hear from the audience that it was a cultural revolution in our country!

 

Natalia Myazina and Daryana Antipova

 

The ceremony was conducted by Andrei Bukharin, music critic and columnist for Rolling Stone magazine. This year, 46 music collectives from 25 cities were nominated. Voting was conducted with the participation of 12 jury members, consisting of the largest specialists in the field of folk music from 9 countries: Ben Mandelson from the UK, Jarmila Vlchkova from Slovakia, Nataliya Shostina from Russia, Simon Broughton from the UK, Aengus Finnan from the US, Rolf Beydemuller from Germany, Alexander Cheparukhin from Russia, Arne Berg from Norway, Andrew Cronshaw from the UK, Nick Hobbs from Turkey, Carlos Seixas from Portugal and Yury Romanov from Russia. In total, 12 samurais and absolutely wonderful people.

The special guest Arne Berg from NRK (Norway) and musical journalist Vadim Ponomarev (Guru Ken) had a networking meeting named “World music today: identity, migration, context” the next day on November 24th at Pioneer Cinema Bookstore.

Organizers are Natalia Myazina and Daryana Antipova.

 

The Russian World Music Awards team

 

The best authentic project – Merema:

 

The best world music project – Seven Eight Band:

 

The best experimental project – Nadishana:

 

Listener’s choice – Gilead:

 

Debut Group – Karelia:

 

Best Music Video – Ottawa Yo:

 

World Music Legend – Sergey Starostin

 

Contributions to world music – Theodor Bastard

 

More information:

www.russianworldmusicawards.ru
vk.com/russianworldmusicawards

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Hungarian Ensemble Meszecsinka Completes 2017 Russian Tour

Meszecsinka

 

Hungarian world music band Meszecsinka is back from its Russian tour. The group performed in Saint Petersburg, Moscow, Dubna and Sergiev Posad from November 2-5, 2017.

In Bulgarian, Meszecsinka means a “small moon” and comes from vocalist Annamari’s favorite Bulgarian folk song. Annamari Oláh sings in seven languages (Hungarian, Russian, Bulgarian, Finnish, English, Italian and Spanish) and one of their own. The group itself comes from two countries (Hungary, Bulgaria) and leads listeners into a wonderland, where Bulgarian and Hungarian folk lives together with Latin music and funk, Eastern and experimental.

 

 

This was my second time in Russia. I only was in Moscow 3 years ago so now I could see more details of Russia,” said Annamari Oláh to WorldmusicCentral. “Sometimes I felt I was in a movie or at home or like ’Hedgehog in the Fog’. I loved to travel between cities. The worst thing was that we hadn’t enough time for sightseeing but I got a lot of hugs, energy, unforgettable moments and words and shining eyes, gifts, and it was an incredible surprise when a couple who live in St. Petersburg, but they missed our concert on Nov. 2nd, traveled to Sergiyev Posad to see us (it’s in the Moscow region). I totally filled up with energy and this trip was inspired me a lot”.

 

 

Meszecsinka’s members are Annamari Oláh on vocal, Biljarszki Emil on guitar, Krolikowski Dávid on percussion and Vajdovich Árpád on bass guitar.

 

 

Russia is a special story for me,” says Emil Biljarszki, “ because I grew up there. I took up its music, culture and still swear in Russian sometimes even if I left it in 1982 (I was born in Bulgaria and since 1984 I’ve been living here in Hungary). I met old and new friends in Saint Petersburg and Moscow. Meszecsinka tours regularly in Europe, we’ve been twice in America and it was our second time in Russia. Recently we started playing mostly in Eastern Europe and the reason is that it’s more interesting and the audience is better. Maybe we’re paid more in Germany but in Bulgaria, Russia and Poland I always feel that we’re loved. There is a short video from our Saint Petersburg backstage:
https://www. facebook. com/meszecsinka/videos/10159899375605393/

Annamari Oláh (Meszecsinka)

 

Our organizers Daryana, Maria and Yuri worked as magicians, they organized concerts 2 weeks before our coming to Russia exactly on dates and places we needed. For example there was a sold out concert in nuclear city of Dubna, we played for the atom workers!

Meszecsinka has performed in the biggest venues of Hungary like Millenáris or Palace of Arts and at many festivals in the country and almost all European countries.

The band tours frequently in many European countries. They visited the USA and Canada, recorded video on the Red Square in Moscow and a Balkan road movie. Their art video “Kinyílok (I open up) reached the sixth place on the video chart of World Music Network (UK) and fRoots Magazine (UK).

Meszecsinka is one of the 12 best Hungarian world music bands according to the WOMEX edition of Dal+Szerző magazine.

More about the band:
www.Meszecsinka.hu
youtube.com/user/meszecsinka

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One Beat Russia in Moscow This Weekend

Alexander Arkhincheev

OneBeat Russia will arrive to Moscow this weekend. The event brings together nine socially engaged musicians from Russia and the United States to compose, create and perform original music, and explore ways that music-making can build community across cultural and geographic divides.

OneBeat Russia is comprised of three one-week residencies, starting in the medieval city of Suzdal, continuing to Sviyazhsk Island and Kazan in Tatarstan, and ending with a week in Moscow, co-organized by Ground Khodynka.

Our one-of-a-kind ensemble will celebrate the 100-year anniversary of Stravinsky’s ‘L’Histoire du Soldat,’ reimagining the work entirely while drawing inspiration from its original intent to use the power of myth and folk tales to bring art and music to people from all walks of life. Conversely, OneBeat Russia draws the sounds and stories of the public into the art world. In addition to performances and workshops, OneBeat Russia fellows and staff will produce original recordings, music videos, photos and social media to share the experience with wider audiences.

In times of challenged US-Russia relations, this program emphasizes the creative connections and enduring good will between the people and artistic communities of the United States and Russia.

Moscow

Saturday, June 24: Powerhouse Moscow — 8pm — Free admission
Sunday, June 25: Ground Khodynka — 4pm/8pm — 100 Rubles

Participants:

Alexander Arkhincheev – morin huur, vocalist
Alexander Serechenko – electronic musician, saxophonist
Marina Vishnyakova – composer, violinist
Daryana Antipova – drummer, vocalist
Diana Burkot – drummer, sound artist
Andrey Dolgov – balalaika, domra player
Aquil Charlton – electronic musician, rapper
Eduardo Valencia – percussionist
Aurora Nealand – clarinetist, saxophonist, singer

More at 1beat.org

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