Tag Archives: Susana Baca

Memorable Concert by Peruvian Legend Susana Baca at Carolina Theater

Susana Baca

Acclaimed Peruvian singer Susana Baca gave a remarkable concert at the Carolina Theater in Durham, North Carolina. The show was presented jointly by the Carolina Theater and Duke Performances.

Susana Baca was introduced as a living legend by Eric Oberstein, interim director at Duke Performances. Indeed, Susana Baca is one of the most significant and influential artists in recent Peruvian roots music history: famed singer-songwriter, ethnomusicologist, educator, and winner of two Latin Grammy Awards. 

The world music star performed a set of Afro-Peruvian classics, poetic songs by well-known Peruvian poets, and two songs celebrating the music of Argentina and Puerto Rico. At 74, she still charms audiences with her charisma and graceful dances on stage.

The band was an outstanding acoustic trio: piano maestro Hector Enrique Purizaga Aguirre; virtuoso bassist Alvin Oscar Huaranga Huaranga; and the versatile Hugo Rolando Bravo Sanchez on cajon, drums and other percussion instruments. Susana invited an excellent Juilliard-trained violinist and Duke University educator named Jennifer Curtis to collaborate on one song. To find out more about Susana Baca, read her biography.

Special thanks to Jeff Doyle at Maria Matias Music and Greg Landau for their assistance to World Music Central.

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The Rhythm Foundation in Miami Reveals the Fall-Winter 2018-19 Season

The Rhythm Foundation, the arts presenter of world music and other forms of music in South Florida, has announced the artists scheduled to perform in the Fall-Winter 2018-19 Season.

Saturday, September 22nd
North Beach Bandshell
Juana Molina. Opening set by Afrobeta
Argentine indie-folk-electronic star in a rare Miami concert.

 

Omar Souleyman

 

Friday, October 5th
North Beach Bandshell
Omar Souleyman. Opening set by Richie Hell. Co-Presented with MDC Live Arts
Syrian electronic artist on Diplo’s Mad Decent record label. Recently collaborated with Björk and Four Tet.

Saturday, October 6th
North Beach Bandshell
Roberto Cacciapaglia
Annual Italian music HIT Week event showcasing this striking composer blending electronic experimental music with the classical tradition.
Free with RSVP

Friday, October 12th
North Beach Bandshell
The Ecstatic Music of Alice Coltrane
The devotional recordings of Jazz legend Alice Coltrane as released last year on David Byrne’s Luaka Bop record label performed by the album’s Sai Anantam Singers.

Thursday, October 18th
Pérez Art Museum Miami
Hieroglyphic Being
A unique electronic artist making music at the intersection of Deep House, Afrofuturism, avant-jazz, EBM, and global soundscapes.

Friday, October 26th
Adrienne Arsht Center
Youssou Ndour
African world music star with his band Super Étoile.

Friday, November 9th
Fillmore Miami Beach
Diego El Cigala

Spain’s superb and innovative Flamenco singer will performs intimately with piano as inspired by his past work with Cuban pianist Bebo Valdés,

Friday, December 7th
Emerson Dorsch Gallery
Ssingssing
A group described as Talking Heads/David Bowie/B-52’s meets South Korean shamanic rock.
Free with RSVP

 

Mdou Moctar

 

Friday, January 18th, 2019
Gramps
Mdou Moctar
African desert blues Tuareg artist from Niger on the Sahel Sounds record label.
Free with RSVP

Weekend, Feb. 8th – 10th, 2019
North Beach Bandshell
GroundUp Music Fest
Third annual festival presented by the GroundUp record label in partnership with The Rhythm Foundation.

Saturday, February 16th, 2019
North Beach Bandshell
Susana Baca
The best-known living exponent of the Afro-Peruvian musical tradition introduced to international audiences in the late 1990s by David Byrne.

 

Habib Koité & Bassekou Kouyaté

 

Saturday, March 16th, 2019
Little Haiti Cultural Center
Habib Koité & Bassekou Kouyaté
Two of Mali’s most renowned musicians come together for the U.S. premier tour of their new duo project.

Sunday, March 17th, 2019
South Miami-Dade Cultural Arts
Anoushka Shankar. Co-Presented with SMDCAC
Sitarist Anoushka Shankar is the daughter of Ravi Shankar and sister of Norah Jones. She is the torch-bearer of her family’s Indian classical tradition.

 

More information and tickets at www.rhythmfoundation.com

headline photo: Susana Baca

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Artist profiles: Susana Baca

Susana Baca

Susana Baca was born in Lima on May 24, 1944, although she grew up in the small black coastal barrio of Chorrillos, “populated with fishermen and cats,” Susana remembers, where the descendants of slaves have lived since the days of the Spanish empire.

She grew up surrounded by music and her mother’s good cooking. Señora Baca taught her daughter what she knew of both. “My father played guitar and my mother showed me my first steps – she was dancer, not a singer. I listened to the radio and watched Mexican movies, all those great rumba dancers and Cuban musicians like Pérez Prado and Beny Moré.”

As a child, she would accompany her mother when she cleaned homes and says that the only way she could keep still was when her mother put on classical music. Her father, who was a driver, was also the barrio’s own street guitarist and would often play outdoors with a group of neighborhood musicians. Their instruments were usually guitars and a percussive instrument called the cajón (a wooden box).

Despite childhood asthma, Susana avidly pursued folk singing and dancing. “Every June 29, there was the Chorrillos festival, with a religious procession for the patron saint. It was very pretty. The townspeople carried the image of Saint Peter onto a boat out to sea to bless the water and the season’s fishing. The next day everyone in town went down to the beach. The old folks played guitar and cajón, everyone sang.”

It was at school that her talents were noticed, and as she took an interest in the poets of Peru, she began to see herself as a link in the cultural work of preservation and instruction. She formed an experimental music group combining poetry and song. Through grants from Peru’s Institute of Modern Art and the National Institute of Peruvian Culture, she began performing. At the prestigious international Agua Dulce festival in Lima, she took top honors.

Susana began to attract attention, the most flattering of which was the admiration of the late Chabuca Granda. One of the great figures of Latin American song, composer and singer Granda was known throughout the Americas for her works in many idioms, but it was only late in her life that she turned her attention to the sounds of Afro-Peru. In Susana she must have seen a worthy successor, and hired her as personal assistant, inviting the young singer into her home. “She was the mother of my singing,” Susana recalls. “One of her records she dedicated to me, and it had a lyric, ‘Don’t forget about missing me.'”

At Chabuca’s insistence, Susana was given her first opportunity to record professionally in Peru. But the composer’s sudden death in 1983 left all deals off. Susana’s work continued, but it would be years later before any label sought to bring her to a wider audience.

Her journey to success has been a long one. She fondly remembers the day in 1995 when she got a phone call in Peru saying that David Byrne wanted to meet with her. She could not believe it at first, and admits that, while she knew of him, she did not know much about him. “He wasn’t in my world at the time,” she says.

Susana Baca

She decided that it would be better to cook a meal for him at her house rather than go out to a fancy restaurant. She recalls, somewhat embarrassed, that she had to take her large dog outside to keep him from excitedly jumping on Byrne when he arrived for dinner. It was the first meeting in what has proved to be a fruitful artistic partnering since she signed to his recording label, Luaka Bop.

My repertoire is both old and new. It has to be that way. That’s how you mature in life, and how you grow into your culture. I have traditional songs about the life of our grandparents in the countryside, others are more about rhythm and dancing. These are the festejo, the landó, the golpe é tierra. There are songs more tied to city life and more ‘composed’ music: the waltz, the marinera and the zamacueca. Then there are those which in their joy and pain share a diversity of rhythmic and interpretative aims like Afro-Peruvian culture, they are mixtures of very different forms.”

The resilience of Susana Baca’s talent lies in these tensions, ones which have haunted a people for centuries, and continue to rattle like ghosts throughout the history of the Americas. With her gifts of song and dance, Susana lights a way beyond the past, a way into healing. “I never wanted to become a museum for the dead. Interpreting the old and traditional songs in a new way has always been my greatest goal,” she avers. “This is what unites the old and the new, all that is ours in an unending story.”

Susana Baca’s year 2000 release Eco de Sombras, represented her further emergence from the rich Afro-Peruvian musical tradition first introduced to North American listeners on The Soul of Black Peru, and her self-titled Luaka Bop debut. Alongside the cajón are the modern sensibilities of such guest musicians as John Medeski and Tom Waits, and veterans Marc Ribot on guitar and Oreg Cohen on bass.

Baca does not consider herself a pan-American artist. She is not seeking “crossover” success in the English-speaking realm. She is quite comfortable staying in Peru and worries what would happen to her art if she ever left for good. Besides, she says, “I suffer without the food of Peru.”

While she fully intends to stick to her roots in Peru, she was on quite a journey in 2005: recording her album ‘Travesias’ (Passages) in upstate New York in the spring, and traveling to the Congo before returning to the United States to begin a fellowship to study the music of the African Diaspora. As fate would have it, she began her fellowship in New Orleans-three weeks before Hurricane Katrina came along. The year-long fellowship began in August of 2005 at Tulane University, where Baca planned to study Creole music and the work of Louis Armstrong. When the hurricane hit the city, everything came to a halt.

I couldn’t believe-the situation,” she recalled from her small office at the University of Chicago, where she was offered a place to continue her fellowship. “When you live in Latin America you expect the government to do nothing. You know that you are on your own.”

Luckily, an artist friend arranged for a car to get her out of the city shortly before it was decimated. As she fled New Orleans with nothing but a suitcase, she looked out at the drowning city and felt an intense, deep-sinking feeling as she saw the faces of people staggering on the side of the road. “I felt that they had been abandoned,” she said softly, tears welling up in her eyes. “I felt paralyzed.”

She was scheduled to perform a series of concerts in Helsinki immediately after the evacuation and described the experience as cathartic following the destruction in New Orleans. “I had to alleviate that tragedy through music.”

It is this kind of quiet intensity that pervades her Travesias album. It is a record she describes as a personal dialogue, a collection of intimate moments for the person who is alone and who is in love. The songs are stripped down, quiet, like a late-night conversation.

In the hauntingly poignant “Merci Bon Dieu,” which was written by Franz Cassius, the childhood music teacher other guitarist Marc Ribot, she sings:

Thank you Lord
Keep all that nature provides for us
Keep it for when misery comes for us

While she does not consider herself a religious person in the traditional Roman Catholic sense that dominates Latin America, it has influenced who she is. “The first thing you learn in religion is to share. I feel that that is what I am doing.”

Baca and her husband, Ricardo Pereida, started a cultural center, the Instituto Negro Continuo “Black Continuum” in Lima in 1998 with the goal to teach children about music and art in her hometown of Santa Barbara, Peru.

She is very hands-on with the center and describes a Christmas concert the children performed as one of the happiest days of her life. One of her ideals is to give a voice to people who otherwise might not be heard. “I proposed to learn the foundations of our past – to know more about the blacks and their grandparents, who were my grandparents as well. I wanted to know that, aside from being good football players and cooks, we were a culture that had contributed to the formation of a nation,” she says.

Years of labor have created this facility for the exploration, expression and creation of black Peruvian culture. “It began as a need for a place where young people could experience cultural investigation and music making. Now we have a library, an archive, a performance and dance space.”

The artistic growth demonstrated on her debut album have developed concurrently with the institute. “I express myself with the songs and poetry of my people,” Susana explains. “I choose songs that speak to me: they’re tender, melancholic, rhythmic and poetic. And a few of them are a little risqué.”

Despite the tenderness in Baca’s music, it is influenced by a history of political engagement that was aroused with her increasing awareness of societal oppression. As a young woman, Baca was compelled to protest the stark role for women in the church and in a machista society. “I have always been a leftist,” she says, adding how she would sing with a feminist group at fiery, anti-establishment rallies.

Her main literary influences include writers like Arturo Pérez Reverte, Alfredo Bryce, Javier Marias and Mario Vargas Llosa. She has a kinship to Vargas Llosa, in the tradition of Peruvian social protest in her understated manner and actions against machismo and racial prejudice-a manner that never becomes propaganda.

On her trip to the Congo, she saw firsthand the legacy and impact of colonialism on the population. “It’s hard to get people to think and act for themselves after so many years of colonial rule,” Baca says. While there, she performed along with a children’s choir for a series of concerts. “When children learn to think for themselves, it opens doors,” she says.

Her success and performances around the world have admittedly changed her perspective on life. “It’s embarrassing to be applauded in restaurants.”

Susana Baca was appointed Minister of Culture of Peru in 2011 by the Ollanta Humala administration.

Discography

Poesía y Canto Negro (1987)
Vestida de Vida, Canto Negro de las Américas! (Kardum, 1991)
Fuego y Agua (Elephant, 1992)
Susana Baca (Luaka Bop 72438-49034-2-8, 1997)
Eco de Sombras (Luaka Bop 72438-48912-2-0, 2000)
Lamento Negro (Tumi Music, 2001)
Espiritu Vivo (Luaka Bop 72438-11946-2-1, 2002)
Travesias (Luaka Bop, 2006)
Seis Poemas (Luaka Bop, 2010)
Mama (Editora Pregón, 2010)
Cantos de Adoración (2010)
Afrodiaspora (Luaka Bop, 2011)

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Length & Time: Susana Baca

I will be writing a column on Length & Time in music, in each presenting an album and its strategies that pertain to addressing Length & Time.

Peruvian singer Susana Baca’s songs first and foremost exist to feature a voice: Susana Baca’s. Hers is a phenomenal voice, so the purpose of her songs are beauty, as much as it is to highlight Baca.

What’s more is that Baca’s songs are poetic songs in traditional shapes: producing a Baca song is producing poetry and an enunciation of what Bourgeois liberal living obscures. If to produce a Baca song is to produce Baca singing an empathetic rendition of years of cultural history, then to do so well is capture a voice, its empathy, and also years of cultural history in a single song. It’s what her music promises.

Is all of what we’ve just discussed accomplished?

Baca’s album Afrodiaspora features songs that are majestic, poetic, and empathetic. Baca lets the instruments perform confidently enough to not pander to them. We hear her assure that every part of her singing is heard clearly. The song “Afrodiaspora” is a great example of this. When she sings, she takes the spotlight. When she is not singing, it is as if the song was an instrumental song.

Susana Baca
Susana Baca

“Yana Runa” is another example of this. She plunges into her song with her timbre and enunciation, grabbing the spotlight from already lyrical instruments. It came with experience. Her singing on album Lamento Negro is much less poignant and panders much more to the music, especially to strings.

The length of the songs are all radio length but their tempos do not adhere to radio. They are not produced for short attention spans and are richly lyrical, always songs that one can imagine can fill up a room if one gives her song a chance against mass-culture.

Baca’s are songs of confidence, sung at a time when artistic confidence has been plundered by commerce.

Buy Afrodiaspora

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Susana Baca Performs Four Nights in Seattle

Susana Baca
Susana Baca

Seattle (Washington), USA – Afro-Peruvian Vocalist Susana Baca will perform four nights at Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley in support of her new CD Travesías. Band members are Sergio Valdeos (guitar), David Pinto (bass), Juan Medrano Cotito (cajón) and Hugo Bravo (percussion). Set times are Thursday through Saturday at 7:30pm and 9:30pm. Set time on Sunday is at 7:30. Doors open at 6pm on Thursday and 5:30pm Friday – Sunday.

In 2002, Baca became the first Peruvian to win a Latin Grammy (best folk album, Lamento Negro), but away from the limelight, she has forged a reputation as a trailblazer. She is not only one of the greatest divas in South America, she is a tireless researcher, and is largely responsible for the revival of many forms of Afro-Peruvian folklore.

Baca belongs to a new generation of Peruvian singers, delving into the shadows of the past to recover shimmering melodies and seductive rhythms. Her seemingly effortless interpretative skills belie years of work assembling the songs, the stories and the steps of music and dances once consigned to history. The Peruvian vocalist who first won an international following with “Maria Lando,” a track on the 1995 David Byrne produced The Soul of Black Peru, has often been compared to Cape Verde’s Cesaria Evora. It’s not surprising; both women have found rich material in folk traditions of their countries, and both sing songs that are steeped in darker emotions.

Susana Baca is wed to a sound and a history. Although her music was born in the coastal barrios of Peru, her artistry can’t be contained within these boundaries, just as her appeal can’t be limited to cognoscenti of Afro-Peruvian traditional song. Baca is credited with the revival of African-rooted music of Peru and for introducing it to the global masses through her works under the Luaka Bop imprint.

Through her recordings, she has preserved the legacy and heritage of the enslaved West Africans who were brought to Peru in the 16th century. Her Instituto Negro Contínuo, which she runs with her husband, was set up to document the culture, music and dance associated with her ancestry.

Her songs on slavery and suffering and often reworked Afro-Peruvian classics not only serve as a reminder of her past but an exhortation to younger Peruvians to reach back to their past. Baca opened up access to this segment of the society with her jazz-inflected efforts and detailed attention to graceful lyrics, which is often cited as the principal difference between her and her music predecessors.

Reservations can be made at www.jazzalley.com, by phoning 206-441-9729 or through TicketMaster at www.ticketmaster.com. Making reservations is advised. Children under the age of 12 are admitted free. All shows are all ages and there is always FREE PARKING across from its entrance. The Pacific Jazz Institute does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin.

The Pacific Jazz Institute at Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley is located at 2033 6th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121.

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