Tag Archives: Afro-Latin

Artist Profiles: Santana

Carlos Santana

Carlos Santana was born on July 20, 1947 in Autlán de Navarro, Jalisco, Mexico. His father, José, an accomplished mariachi violinist, introduced Carlos to ‘traditional music’ at the age of five. The family moved to the border boom town of Tijuana in 1955, where Carlos seriously took up guitar, studying and emulating the sounds of B.B. King, John Lee Hooker, T. Bone Walker and other blues greats he heard on the radio.

As much as he was inspired by the early training he received from his father in traditional musical form and theory, Carlos soon realized his dream was to break free and play rock and roll. He began performing with local bands like The T.J.s, adding his own personal flair to the popular songs of the 1950s.

As he continued playing with different bands up and down the bustling ‘Tijuana Strip,’ Carlos Santana began to hone his considerable skills and invent his inimitable sound. In 1961, he moved to San Francisco, in the United States, joining his family, who had relocated there the previous year.

Destiny had most certainly brought Carlos to the right place at the right time, planting him right in the middle of the burgeoning and hugely influential San Francisco Bay Area music scene. The Bay Area in the 1960s was a melting pot of cultural, political and artistic change. In this climate, Carlos continued to evolve his unique, genre-bending style, and in 1966, he took his music to the people with the debut performance of the Santana Blues Band.

For the next two years, the group was swept up in a whirlwind of acclaim and popularity that carried them from Bill Graham’s historic Fillmore West venue to the main stage at the Woodstock ‘Peace, Love, Music’ Festival. There, on August 16, 1969, the Santana band’s Latin-flavored rock was delivered to the masses.

The world embraced Carlos Santana with passion, captivated by music that was always changing, heralded by a guitar prowess that today remains among the most distinctive. Each new release – including several platinum and gold albums – emerged as a reflection of Carlos’s personal growth and artistic evolution.

Fans also reveled in his humanitarian messages and spiritual affirmations – subtle urgings towards peace, joy, acceptance, compassion and understanding – that have been consistently communicated in a gentle, heartfelt manner at live performances around the globe.

Carlos Santana

The Santana Band achieved double-platinum status their first time out with the 1969 Columbia debut album, Santana, featuring the hit single ‘Evil Ways,’ and quadruple-platinum with Abraxas, the classic 1970 follow-up which boasted among its tracks ‘Black Magic Woman’ and the incomparable Tito Puente composition “Oye Como Va.”

A period of experimentation with fusion jazz and non-Latin world sounds began with the supern Middle Eastern flavored fusion album Caravensarai in 1972. Santana also collaborated with John McLaughlin, leader of the Mahavishnu Orchestra, one of the top jazz-rock fusion bands at the time.

A musical family reunion took place in 1994 with the album Brothers, which featured collaborations with Carlos’s sibling Jorge and nephew Carlos Hernández.

In 1995, the comprehensive Legacy boxed-set retrospective came out. This was followed in 1997 by a 2-CD collection, Live At The Fillmore, featuring performances from Santana’s historic 1968 shows.

Carlos Santana

Significant filmed repertoire include the 1988 video retrospective Viva Santana, the 1993 South American concert video Sacred Fire, and 1997’s CD-ROM A History of Santana: The River Of Color And Sound. Fox Television aired the gala special A Supernatural Evening with Santana, a celebration of the record-setting album featuring performances with Rob Thomas, Lauryn Hill, Dave Matthews and Sara McLachlan, among others. This passion also paved the way for ventures into the new musical and geographic territories, including the scoring of the feature film La Bamba, participating in 1987’s Rock ‘n Roll Summit, the first-ever joint US-Soviet rock concert and embarking on a 1988 tour with great jazz saxophonist Wayne Shorter.

Carlos Santana has also contributed his talents tot he benefit of numerous charitable causes, among them Blues for Salvador, San Francisco Earthquake Relief, Tijuana Orphans, Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and education for Latin youth in association with the Hispanic Media &Education Group. He’s received numerous civic and humanitarian commendations over the years. In 1998, Carlos Santana and his wife Deborah started the Milagro Foundation.Its mission is to help underprivileged youths.

On Thursday, June 5, 2003, Carlos Santana pledged the profits of his 2003 Shaman tour to fight AIDS. The 23-show Shaman tour was estimated to bring in between 2.5 and 3 million dollars to the cause.

Discography:

Solo albums and collaborations:

Carlos Santana & Buddy Miles! Live! (Columbia, 1972)
Love Devotion Surrender, with Mahavishnu John McLaughlin (Columbia, 1973)
Illuminations, with Turiya Alice Coltrane (Columbia, 1974)
Oneness (Silver Dreams-Golden Reality) (Columbia, 1979)
The Swing Of Delight (Columbia, 1980)
Havana Moon (Columbia, 1983)
Blues For Salvador (Columbia, 1987)
Divine Light (Columbia, 2001)
Live At The 1988 Montreux Jazz Festival, with Wayne Shorter Band (Liberation Entertainment, 2005)
The Essential Santana ‎(Sony Records, 2009)
Illumination Live At Montreux 2011, with John McLaughlin (Eagle Records, 2013)

Santana band:

Santana (Columbia Records, 1969)
Abraxas (Columbia Records, 1970)
Santana III (Columbia Records, 1971
Caravanserai (Columbia Records, 1972)
Welcome (Columbia Records, 1973)
Lotus (Columbia Records, 1974)
Borboletta (Columbia Records, 1974)
Amigos (Columbia Records, 1976)
Festival (Columbia Records, 1976)
Moonflower, (Columbia Records, 1977)
Inner Secrets (Columbia Records, 1978)
Marathon (Columbia Records, 1979)
Zebop! (Columbia Records, 1981)
Shangó (Columbia Records, 1982)
Beyond Appearances(Columbia records, 1985)
Freedom (Columbia Records, 1987)
Spirits Dancing In The Flesh (CBS, 1990)
Milagro (PolyGram, 1992)
Sacred Fire: Santana Live In South America (Polydor, 1993)
Live At The Fillmore 1968 (Columbia Records, 1997)
Supernatural (Arista, 1999)
Shaman (Arista, 2002)
All That I Am (Arista, 2005)
The Woodstock Experience (Sony BMG, 2009)
Guitar Heaven: The Greatest Guitar Classics Of All Time (Arista, 2010)
Shape Shifter (Sony Music, 2012)
Corazón: Live From México – Live It To Believe It (Sony Music Latin, 2014)
Corazón (Sony BMG, 2014)
Santana IV (Santana IV Records, 2016)
Santana IV Live At The House Of Blues Las Vegas (Eagle Rock, 2016)
Power Of Peace, with The Isley Brothers (Legacy, 2017)

DVDs

Supernatural Live – An Evening with Carlos Santana and Friends (2002)
Santana – Live by Request (Arista, 2005)

Books

Jam with Carlos Santana with CD with CD (Audio). Publisher: Warner Brothers Publications (2000). ISBN: 1843285371
Santana Easy Guitar Anthology. Publisher: Alfred Publishing Company (2001). ISBN: 0757902200
In Session with Carlos Santana. Warner Bros Pubns; Book & CD edition (1999). ISBN: 1859096220
Carlos Santana: Back on Top by Marc Shapiro. Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin (2002).ISBN: 0312288522
Soul Sacrifice by Simon Leng. Publisher: Firefly Publishing (2000). ISBN: 0946719292

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The Rich Sounds of Afro-Cuban Percussion

Michael Spiro & Joe Galvin – Bákini: En el Nuevo Mundo

Michael Spiro & Joe Galvin – Bákini: En el Nuevo Mundo (Iu Music, 2017)

Bakini: En el Nuevo Mundo is a celebration of Afro-Latin percussion performed by the acclaimed Afro-Cuban Folkloric Ensemble that came out of the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music.

Produced by percussionists Michael Spiro and Joe Galvin, Bákini: En el Nuevo Mundo is a fabulous introduction to the marvelous world of Afro-Cuban folkloric percussion. However, the ensemble goes beyond Cuba by incorporating Brazilian musical forms, Caribbean calypso, strings, brass and percussion instruments from other regions of the world.

Bákini: En el Nuevo Mundo is divided into three suites. The first one, Aganyú suite, combines Afro-Cuban religious music and secular sounds. The lead singer (akpuón) is Jesús Diaz.

Macarambique Suite mixes Brazilian maracatú with a relatively modern Cuban rhythm called Mozambique and celebrates carnaval (carnival) festivities throughout the Americas.

The final set is “Oyá Suite,” another Afro-Cuban inspired piece with some unexpected innovations like a Brazilian samba battery. The akpuón here is Michael Mixtatacki.

The CD booklet includes extensive information about the artists, musical forms, instruments used and the development of the suites. It also contains a glossary.

The personnel that participated in Bákini includes Michael Spiro on iyá (batá drum), caja, quinto and other percussion instrument; Joe Galvin on okónkolo (batá drum), vocals, steelpan, chequeré (shaker) and vocals; Kristin Olson on itótele (batá drum), vocals and keyboard percussion; Jesús Diaz on quinto and lead vocals; Michael Mixtacki on chequeré; Scott Ketner on percussion; Eli Edelman on yonofó drum, caja and various other percussion instruments; Andy Miller on timbal; Ben Christensen on vocals; Jen Bollero on vocals, Fabiana Masili on vocals; Liliana Araujo on vocals; Brenna Johns on trombone; Alex Dura on saxophone; Mitchell Shiner on vibraphone; Jeremy Allen on double bass; Marco Núñez on flute; Daniel Stein on violin; Clara Scholtes on violin; Rose Wollman on viola; Leonardo Vásquez on viola and Chris Cho on cello.

Buy the digital download version of Bakini: En el Nuevo Mundo.The CD is available from cdbaby.com

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The Pan-American Musical Travels of Ladama

Ladama – Ladama (Six Degrees, 2017)

Ladama is a talented female ensemble featuring musicians from Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil and the United States. The band’s self-titled debut album includes a captivating mix of soul and pop with rhythms and melodies from throughout South America and the Caribbean, sometimes mixing Colombian beats and Brazilian forms. Vocals are in Spanish, Portuguese and English, where the voices of Sara Lucas and Lara Klaus stand out. Ladama uses traditional musical instruments like the bandola llanera from the plains of Venezuela, tambor alegre from Colombia and a wide range of percussion instruments.

Personnel: Mafer Bandola [María Fernanda González] (Venezuela) on bandola llanera; Lara Klaus (Brazil) on vocals and percussion; Daniela Serna (Colombia) on vocals and tambor alegre; and Sara Lucas (United States of America) on vocals, classical guitar and electric guitar.

Guests: Nathan Koci on accordion; Pat Swoboda on acoustic and electric bass; Kyla-Rose Smith on violin; Alex Asher on trombone; cole Kamen-Green on trumpet; and Mohamed Araki on keyboards.

 

 

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San Francisco’s Zanzibar

Zanzibar – Zanzibar

Zanzibar – Zanzibar (Zanzibar, 2014)

American band Zanzibar delivers a rhythmically powerful mix of Afro-Funk, Afro-Latin music and rock. The vocals by this San Francisco-based are in various languages, including English, Spanish, Portuguese, and French.

Personnel: Chris Robison on guitar and percussion; Kerry Wing on lead vocals, guitar and percussion; Eric Tabellion on bass, background vocals and percussion; Tim Hilborn on drums, percussion, trumpet, and vocals; Ricardo Molina on percussion and vocals; and David Hipshman on tenor saxophone and flute.

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Latin Afrojam from Chicago

¡ESSO! Afrojam Funkbeat

¡ESSO! Afrojam Funkbeat – Juntos (2017)

Juntos is the new album by a Chicago-based collective with rotating members named ¡ESSO! (El Sonido Sonic Octopus). The band’s sound crosses numerous musical boundaries. It’s a superb mix of Afro-Latin, funk, rock, jazz, Afrobeat, pop, reggaeton, ska, cumbia, and more.

The band features seductive rhythms and a creative brass section. On the vocals side ¡ESSO! features lead and background vocals in Spanish. There is also some less interesting, tired rapping thrown in.

The members of ¡ESSO! Afrojam Funkbeat are committed to social justice, performing for grassroots community organizations that support after-school, immigrant justice, and fair housing programs throughout Chicago and Illinois.

Personnel: Armando Pérez on guitar, bass, keyboards and vocals; Kevin Miller on saxophone; Dan Lieber on drums and percussion; Ezra Lange on bass; Diana Mosquera on vocals; Lessic Franko on percussion; Jess Anzaldúa on percussion; and Matthew Davis on trombone. Juntos also includes various guests.

Buy the digital download version of Juntos. The CD is available from cdbaby.com

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