Just Joiking – Sami joiks for a new millennium

Inga Juuso
Inga Juuso

Frozen Moments (Inga Juuso, Rogelio de Badajoz Durán, Jai Shankar Sahajpal & others) Live Recording (DAT, 1999)

Orbina II (DAT, 2002)

Anders P. Bongo – Dolin (DAT, 2003)

Although the Sami (also Saami or Sámi) are descendants of the original Finn (Finland), first discovered by the Romans around 10 AD, contemporary Sami people proves just as innovative and resourceful as their ancestors with a unique flare for modern technology. Both Sami art and music has flourished internationally. And the Sami people once tormented by the Christian church of the northern
climes and the so-called civilized Swedes, Norwegians and other arctic dwellers, have proven that they are here to stay, both in Europe and North America.

The Sami who once watched their shamans and drums burn during the inquisitions are back beating drums and performing yoiks (also joiks), a vocalization practice that is considered one of Europe’s oldest living traditions. And similar to the circle that appears on the Sami flag, Sami musicians include people from all cultures in their repertoire.

Today, you will find electric guitars, keyboards and drum machines embellishing yoiks or you will find award-winning joikers performing classic yoiks a cappella. Many yoikers such as Wimme (Finland), Inga Juusco (Norway), Marie Boine (Norway), Ailu Gaup (Norway) and Ulla Pirttijarvi (Finland) have garnered
an international following as well as, working with other well-known non-Sami musicians and producers. Wimme has worked with Hedningarna and Hector Zazou and Marie Boine has collaborated with Bill Laswell. And the popular Finnish group, Varttina has even featured yoiks on their recordings. I read an article awhile back about Sami musicians collaborating with Inuit musicians. This didn’t surprise me since both cultures practice throat-singing and derive from a nature-based religion tied in with the cycles of the Arctic Circle where they reside. And I read in an interview with Wimme Saari that when he first
discovered recordings of his uncles’ yoiks, he found a resemblance with Navajo chants.

The three recordings mentioned in this short article portray a unique versatility. Frozen Moments, a live recording marries flamenco, yoiks and classical Indian music. Orbina II takes a more ambient rock approach with Celtic coloring and Anders P. Bongo provides 50 classical yoiks in the traditional a
cappella format. All three recordings were released on the innovative Norwegian label, DAT that produces books and music featuring the Sami heritage. You will find contact information at the end of this article.

Frozen Moments featuresInga
Juuso
(yoiks), Johan Sara Jr. (yoiks, guitar, producer), Erik Steen (flamenco guitar, producer), Rogelio De Badajoz Duran (flamenco vocals), and Jai Shankar Sahajpal (tabla and vocals) and as anyone might imagine, this collaboration offers plenty of virtuoso moments. This group of musicians pushes
both rhythmic and vocal boundaries. One could hardly call their performance a frozen moment since there is nothing icy or stagnate about this passionate music that leaps over borders and sets fire to false cultural perceptions. And the performers also set flame to any rules that pertain to their various musical disciplines.

For instance, the track Voices showcases yoiks, throat-singing, classical Indian vocals along with flamenco cante. The end result is the strangest and most beautiful a cappella composition my ears have ever witnessed. And all the tracks on this recording dole out similar surprises, sometimes leaving a listener yearning for words to describe the music. Inga performs a solo yoik on Harsh Spring, Petenera features a duet with Rogelio on voice and Erik on flamenco guitar while Jai’s tabla contributions are highlighted throughout the recording. Yet, the true musical power happens when these five musicians collaborate. Frozen Moments not only appeal to iconoclastic thinkers, but also to musicians wishing to explore other musical territories and to music lovers in general.

Orbina - Orbina II
Orbina – Orbina II
The Norwegian group, Orbina that is comprised of Inga Juuso (yoiks), Leif Isak Nilut (yoiks), Klemet Anders Buljo (yoiks, guitars), Bjorn Ole Rasch (keyboards) with Svein Schultz (bass), Rune Arnesen (drums) and Hans Fredrik Jakobsen (flute and bagpipes) offers ultra-modern yoiks. And in fact, the music that appears on Orbina II carries an ambient rock sensibility colored with Celtic overtones. On one hand, the music is similar to Wimme’s electronic yoiks, but then it also resembles Mari Boine’s jazz renderings. And the Celtic influence probably comes with Norway’s ancient ties to Scotland. Also for those readers familiar with Norwegian folks root music, will recognize Bjorn Ole Rasch as Norwegian violinist Annbjorn Lien’s musical partner.

Mortena Sàrà falls into light acid jazz while Jeagge-Jussà feels experimental. Boade features a duet with male and female yoiks and Gàisi carries Celtic influences complimented by a flute. Lemet Ante takes this approach further by introducing bagpipes and flute and highlighting a yoik by Anders P. Bongo.

And speaking of Anders P. Bongo, his second CD, Dolin released earlier this year, offers traditional yoiks sung a cappella. Anders performs 50 yoiks, all composed for those who have passed away. The yoiks are all under two minutes long and some of the yoiks feature double vocal tracks.

Anders P. Bongo - Dolin
Anders P. Bongo – Dolin
Anders hails from Kautokeino in Northern Norway and he is dedicated to keeping one of Europe’s oldest living traditions alive. His yoiks, like all yoiks are dedicated to people, a landscape or an animal, but in this case, he dedicates the yoiks to people who have died. Yet, the reindeer herder and award-winning yoiker won’t bring tears of despair to your eyes while honoring the dead. And he might even inspire musicians to learn more about the vibrant Sami culture.

For more information please visit the following labels and distributors:

DAT: www.musiconline.no
www.digelius.com
www.noside.com

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The Purest Voice

Bill Jones

Two Year Winter (Brick Wall Music BRICK 005CD, 2003)

Anyone who has followed the progress of Bill Jones in the last few years will be well aware of the purity of her voice, her refreshing treatments of British traditional and other songs and her disdain for the Folk Police. She is instantly recognisable as someone who is developing her own niche in the music.

The new CD finds her solo and with a talented crew of like-minded musicians around her. For example the title track sees her collaborating with Anne Hills and makes use of a fine arrangement that showcases the work of Shanti Paul Jayasinha on cello along with Stewart Hardy’s violin and Sarah Wright’s flute. In another joint effort with Hills, Lost Chances, the music is stripped down to accordion and cello with Jones’ voice clear and to the fore. The tune is a borrowing from the Irish and adds poignancy to the lyrics.

Her own version of the story of Grace Darling, the Northumbrian heroine, marries another Irish tune to her words and an arrangement that recalls some of the Swarbricking of classic Fairport days.An interesting percussive edge is supplied by Keith Angel who plays djembe and shaker.
A further development is apparent on Diddling Set a group of tunes featuring her ‘diddling’ or lilting or mouth music – whatever you wish to call it. She is as sure voiced on this as on any other material and her singing is further enhanced by some flugel horn and flute.

Finally all jigs don’t need to be flat out string busting affairs, do they ? She takes Night-time Jigs and slows down the pace, giving the lovely Irish and Northumbrian tunes space in which to be heard.

If you haven’t heard her then this is a good place to start, if you have you wont need further recommendation.

Buy Two Year Winter.

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A Call to Spirit: A Reflection on Musical Power

It has been over a decade now since I became ill with a mysterious illness that later became my wake up call. At the time of the illness, I endured a shamanic initiation in the urban world. I grew sensitive to light, sound, chemicals, food and everything around me. The medical establishment and various employers that didn’t believe I suffered from a real illness humiliated me. And after I was forced to walk away from my music career, (I was a solo artist at that time), I met healers who revealed my shamanic gift to me. Since that time, I have experienced many visions about the planet’s future, I have worked with various Spirits (animal, plant and human) and I have discovered my indigenous roots. And I have found the healing forces and hidden power of music, just as many of you have done.I know that many other musicians have experienced acute sensitivity to the world around them as well as, a call to the indigenous way of life. Many who recently died couldn’t handle the harshness of this planet any longer and they of course have my blessing for staying as long as they could. Musicians are sensitive whether they want to admit it or not. Watching the earth being bombed, watching people die needlessly while the powers steal from the common man and Mother Nature would cause anyone to consider death as an option. But the powers that be are not as powerful as the dormant musical force on this planet. So I call to musicians who sit alone crying in anguish over world events and so-called leadership. I call to the magicians, healers, shamans and messengers among you take up your true role on this planet. Don’t mistake fame and money for power and instead embrace your true power that is to serve the earth as volunteer healers. (You won’t need to sacrifice your paying gigs).

Now, I realize many people will tell me that musicians are already contributing to healing the earth by performing at benefit concerts for free or donating a track or two to compilations geared towards healing the earth (worthy efforts). But those efforts are worlds apart from the radical plan I will put forth here. I am asking musicians to join me, no matter where you are on the planet. You don’t need to travel, you don’t need to organize a music festival and you do not need to advertise your efforts in the media. What I am asking is for you to be humble and honor the earth by gathering with other musicians at places on the earth that need healing. If you have instruments use the instruments and if you don’t, sing and clap your hands in sync with your heartbeat. And make sure that these musical gathering takes place outdoors in nature.

The vision that came to me around 4 a.m. (August 30, 2003) was a picture of the earth that resembled Swiss cheese with the holes representing dark energy that needs to be healed. I envisioned musicians joining with indigenous elders, medicine people, avatars, shamans and wiccans and visiting places near them that have experienced recent wars and ancient warfare and send love via music to the earth. Other places that need healing are places where indigenous people were massacred, where bombs exploded and where natural disasters have come as a warning to heal the earth. You don’t need to gather at any set time and this healing can take place over the next couple of years, but we must begin this healing practice soon in order to restore harmony to the planet. Here’s a way for you to contribute your creativity, intuition and compassion to the planet.

Now, I want to inspire you by jogging your memory of your musical ancestors and current musical healing practices. The ancient Egyptians, Dogon people, Aztecs, the Mandinka Kingdom and other civilizations revered musicians. Musicians once played the roles of griots (messengers), leaders of ceremony and rituals, shamans and healers. These musicians performed roles in their various societies that served the people and earth. They were often of the musician class and often their training went beyond musical and embraced spiritual practices. For those of you who believe in reincarnation, you might recall a time where you performed in a sacred temple or perhaps you were a tribal drummer assisting shamans as they entered altered states. Perhaps, that is even your role in this life. If you feel a buzz in your head or limbs, if your heart beats quickly as you read my words, then you more than likely fit into this category and only now are you remembering your true role on this planet. Welcome. And for those of you way ahead of the curve and already performing healing work on the planet, I express my gratitude for your efforts.

Some of you reading this might think that I am a journalist that has eaten a bad mushroom or that I might be deluded. But there have been countless scientific studies that have proven both the healing powers of music and of prayer as well as, meditation. And if you look around you at the state of the earth, you can’t deny that we need to heal it and what better way to do that then through singing and drumming on the earth? One study by Japanese scientist Masaru Emoto (www.masaru-emoto.net/) revealed the healing properties of some music on water molecules. Toxic water would become pure after being exposed to prayer and certain types of music. And pure water would become toxic after exposed to words such as “hate,” and music with hateful lyrics. Imagine if our musical intent was to heal the earth? We could purify the lakes, rivers and the ocean en mass. We could purify the air that we breathe and clear toxins from the earth. We could restore this earth and its inhabitants, period.

As musicians we are the true power holders on the planet. Power doesn’t come from money or from prestige, as a lot of people would like us to believe, but true power comes from the love in our hearts and healing abilities through music. And if millions of musicians and aboriginal people around the planet join forces, nothing can stop us from restoring balance on the planet. We will herald in a new era of abundance and equality for all concerned.

So I return to the original call to musicians. Will you join me in dreaming a balanced planet? And will you join others who have experienced similar visions? Let’s move away from self-importance and unite for a common cause and that is to heal the earth as well as, each other. Namaste.

Compliments of Cranky Crow World Music.

Caution: In the event of extreme violence or danger, use your common sense and do not place yourselves in the line of danger. In some cases, healing ceremonies can be performed at a distance for troubled spots. Your intention is what heals not your proximity to the earth’s wounds.

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The 2003 San Francisco World Music Festival

SFWMFSan Francisco, USA – The 2003 edition of the San Francisco World Music Festival will take place September 4-18, 2003, at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco State University, and the San Francisco Dance Center, featuring artists from Afghanistan, Altay, China, Eastern Europe, India, Kamchatka, Lebanon, Russia, and Tuva.

By bringing together acclaimed international and local world music artists for 2 weeks of dynamic concerts, master classes, documentary film screenings and youth showcases, our festival facilitates human understanding through artistic vulnerability among the world’s cultures,” states Executive Director & Producer Michael Santoro.Kicking off the festival this year on September 4th is a North Indian Master Class by Vijay Kichlu. Another highlight is the first annual “Youth World Music
Showcase” on September 6, featuring elementary and high school students of world music masters in the Bay Area — from Alice Fong Yu Chinese Orchestra & Percussion and Deaf Slam Poets to the India Tabla Quartet and Korean Youth Orchestra. 

It’s important to provide not only role models but opportunities for children in the Bay Area to experience world music,” explains Santoro, “to give them inspiration to pick up an instrument and learn about another culture’s music.” 

On September 18, Chinese Beijing Opera artists Chen Tsai-Yen, Sun Ji-Hai, Guan Yi, and Zhang Ying-Chao will hold live demonstrations in “Voices of Asia.”

Comments Deborah Clearwaters, Manager of Public Programs at the Asian Art Museum, who has worked with Door Dog Music Productions to present a World Music Concert Series at the museum since March 2003, “The Asian Art Museum is proud to be part of the 2003 World Music Festival.  Many artifacts in our museum bear direct connections to musical traditions.  Presenting living masters of Asian music to San Francisco audiences helps build a better understanding of the diversity and richness of Asian culture.”

In addition to music there will be live radio performances, master classes at San Francisco State University, San Francisco Dance Center and the Asian Art Museum, and a documentary film screening at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Screening Room.

The centerpiece of this year’s festival is a specially commissioned orchestral work with libretto by the internationally acclaimed Lebanese composer Marcel Khalife, set to premiere September 11 as an international music experiment and artistic statement for global peace. This centerpiece will be performed by a select orchestra of locally based world music masters, including KITKA, an all women Eastern European vocal ensemble, the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra as directed by Benjamin Simon, Chinese erhu virtuoso Zhang Xiao Feng, Chinese master percussionist Hai Pu, and a leading female Lebanese vocalist Omayma Al Khalil, and includes visual and lighting design by Matthew Antaky. This opening concert will promote San Francisco as a world center for international music collaborations. “This concert is a metaphor for cultural understanding and communication,” notes Santoro.

All of the different compositional components – Western classical music, Chinese traditional music, Arabic music, Eastern European music, and all of the respective cultures uniting — is not an easy task and through this process, newterritories will be explored, providing insight and enrichment,”  says Program Director Kutay Derin Kugay, “The San Francisco World Music Festival
is going beyond traditional music with this commissioned composition by Lebanese composer Marcel Khalife.  And with over 200 strings of the Santur masters, father and son Shivkumars, the festival sets a new standard for world music presentation
.”

VENUES
Asian Art Museum
200 Larkin Street between McAllister & Fulton, San Francisco
www.asianart.org

San Francisco Dance Center
26 – 7th Street @ Market Street, 5th Floor, San Francisco
www.linesballet.org

San Francisco State University, Knuth Hall
1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco
www.sfsu.edu

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
700 Howard Street @ Third, San Francisco
www.ybca.org

SCHEDULE 2003

EVENT: NORTH INDIAN CLASSICAL MASTERCLASS with VIJAY KICHLU
DATE: SEPTEMBER 4
TIME: 6pm
PLACE: Asian Art Museum

EVENT: YOUTH WORLD MUSIC SHOWCASE
Elementary/ high school students of masters in the Bay Area: Alice Fong
Yu
Chinese Youth Orchestra & Percussion Troupe, Fremont Deaf Choir, India
Tabla
Quartet, Korean Center Youth Orchestra, & more…
DATE: SEPTEMBER 6
TIME: 1pm
PLACE: Asian Art Museum

EVENT: MARCEL KHALIFE MASTERCLASS
DATE: SEPTEMBER 10
TIME: 1pm
PLACE: San Francisco State University, Knuth Hall

EVENT: COMMISSIONED WORLD PREMIERE BY MARCELL KHALIFE,
Featuring Marcell Khalife (oud, vocals), San Francisco Chamber
Orchestra,
Zhang Xiao Feng (erhu), Pu Hai (Chinese percussion), Oumayma Al Khalil
(Lebanese vocalist), Members of KITKA
DATE: SEPTEMBER 11
TIME: 8pm
PLACE: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

EVENT: ANCESTORS OF SIBERIA Part One:
featuring Ai-Churek (Tuvan shaman), Chirgilchin (Tuvan throat singers),
Oktay (Russian Old Believers folk group), Sarymay (Altay, singer),
Elvel (Kamchatka folk dance group). Presented in association with Pure
Nature Music and the Silk Road Foundation.
DATE: SEPTEMBER 12
TIME: 8pm
PLACE: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

EVENT: TUVAN OVERTONE SINGING WORKSHOP
Members of Chirgilchin teach basics of overtone singing.
DATE: SEPTEMBER 13
TIME: 1pm
PLACE: SF Dance Center

EVENT: ELVEL DANCE WORKSHOP
Members of Elvel teach the basics of the dance of Kamchatka
DATE: SEPTEMBER 13
TIME: 3pm
PLACE: SF Dance Center

EVENT: MASTERS OF NORTH INDIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC
BEYOND HUNDRED STRINGS featuring the Living Legend of the santoor
Pandit Shivkumar Sharma, with Rahul Sharma (santoor), Ustaad Shafaat
Ahmed Khan (tabla). Presented in association with Bay Area Performing
Arts.
DATE: SEPTEMBER 13
TIME: 8pm
PLACE: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

EVENT: ANCESTORS OF SIBERIA Part Two
Featuring Ai-Churek (Tuvan shaman), Chirgilchin (Tuvan throat singers),
Oktay (Russian Old Believers folk group), Sarymay (Altay, singer),
Elvel (Kamchatka folk dance group). Presented in association with Pure
Nature Music and the Silk Road Foundation.
DATE: SEPTEMBER 14
TIME: 3pm
PLACE: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

EVENT: WORLD MUSIC FILM SCREENINGS
Documentary film “Saaz: A Glance at Afghan Music” & others.
DATE: SEPTEMBER 15
TIME: 7pm
PLACE: Yerba Buena Screening

EVENT: SCHOOL ASSEMBLY/ RESIDENCY PROGRAM
Members of Elvel & Chirgilchin perform assembly program in the
afternoon, work with the school percussion troupe, & perform evening
concert
DATE: SEPTEMBER 17
TIME: 2pm, 6pm
PLACE: Alice Fong Yu Elementary School

EVENT: A CLOSER LOOK AT PEKING OPERA
Make-up & Costume Demonstration; Lecture about Chinese Opera by scholar
Chen
Tsai-Yen; Excerpts of “Farewell My Concubine” performed by Sun Ji-Hai,
Guan
Yi, and Zhang Ying-Chao
DATE: SEPTEMBER 18
TIME: 5-8pm
PLACE: Asian Art Museum

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World Music Festival: Chicago 2003 Schedule

Maria del Mar Bonet
Maria del Mar Bonet
Chicago, USA – The complete schedule of World Music Festival: Chicago 2003 is now available. Chicago will host the fifth annual World Music Festival: Chicago 2003, September 17 – 21.  The multi-venue festival showcases both traditional and contemporary music from many of the world’s diverse cultures. 

Festival events include a mix of free and ticketed concerts as well as live radio broadcasts presented at 22 venues including museums, parks, cultural centers, plazas, theaters, book stores, clubs and other venues throughout Chicago.  For more information call the World Music Festival: Chicago 2003 hotline at 312-742-1938 or visit World Music Festival: Chicago 2003Wednesday, Sept. 17

 

MBC                            
11 am –12 pm              
Luis Jahn (Chicago/Argentina)   FREE

                                                                       
Issa Boulos (Chicago/Palestine)

                                                                       
(live broadcast on WLUW 88.7 FM)     

 

MBC                            
12:30 pm – 2 pm           
Dan Boadi (Chicago/Ghana)                    
FREE

                                                                       
Jim Stoynoff (Chicago/Greece)

(live broadcast
on WNUR 89.3FM)           

 

Borders Books & Music           
12:30 pm                   
Taller de Compas  (Spain)            
FREE

(Michigan Ave.)             

 

Old Town School  8:30 pm                       
Taller de Compas  (Spain)            
$5

                                                                                                                       
suggested donation

 

Thursday, Sept. 18

 

MBC                            
11 am – 12 pm              
Jan Yrgagy (Kyrgyzstan)                
FREE

                                                                       
Liam Teague & Robert Chappell (Chicago/Trinidad)

(live broadcast
on WLUW 88.7 FM)           

 

MBC                            
12:30 pm – 2 pm           
Guerra Freitas (Chicago/Angola)       
FREE

                                                                       
Habibullah Wardak (Chicago/Afghanistan)

                                                                       
(live broadcast on WNUR 89.3FM)                        

 

Borders Books & Music           
12:30 pm                   
Ellika & Solo (Sweden/Senegal)      FREE

(State St.)

                       

Chicago Cultural Center 6 – 11 pm                   
World Music Festival Open House           
FREE

        

Preston Bradley Hall      
6:30pm                        
Friends of the Gamelan (Chicago)

7:45pm                                   
Habibullah Wardak (Chicago/Afghanistan)

& Puran Vyas
(Chicago/India)

9:15 pm                       
Radio Maqam (Chicago)           

                                   

Randolph Café              
7:45pm                        
Jan Yrgagy (Kyrgyzstan)

9:30pm                                   
Taller de Compas (Spain)           

 

 

Claudia Cassidy Theater 7 pm                            
Liam Teague & Panoramic (Chicago/Trinidad)

8:30 pm                       
Morikeba Kouyate & The Jaliya Ensemble


(Chicago/Senegal)       

                                               

All Building:                  
throughout evening           
Environmental Encroachment (Chicago)

 

Friday, Sept. 19

 

MBC                            
11 am – 12 pm              
Ellika and Solo (Sweden/Senegal)      FREE

(live broadcast
on WLUW 88.7 FM)

 

MBC                            
12:30pm – 2 pm           
Taller de Compas (Spain)            
FREE

                                                                       
Super Uba (New York City/Dominican Republic)

(live broadcast
on WNUR 89.3FM)

                       

Daley Center                
12 pm                          
Razbar Ensemble (Iran)               
FREE

 

Borders Books & Music           
12:30 pm                   
Perla Batalla (Los Angeles/Mexico)        
FREE

(State St.)

                       

Borders Books & Music           
12:30 pm                   
Cool Crooners of Bulawayo (Zimbabwe) FREE

(Hyde Park)

                       

Humboldt Park Boathouse 7 pm                                   
Super Uba (New York City/Dominican Republic)        

FREE

                                                                       

Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum 7 pm              
Perla Batalla (Los Angeles/Mexico)        
$12

                                                                       
Maria del Mar Bonet  (Spain)

 

Old Town School  7:30 pm                       
Cool Crooners of Bulawayo (Zimbabwe) $12

                                                                       
Ellika and Solo (Sweden/Senegal)     

 

Museum of Contemporary Art 7:30 pm                  
Beat the Donkey (New York City/Brazil)  $12

 

Rhythm                        
8 pm                            
Drum Drum (Papua New Guinea)            
$8
        

 

Martyrs                        
9:30 pm                       
Zemog (Boston)                                  
$10

                                                                       
Los Hombres Perdidos (Chicago)

 

Empty Bottle                
10 pm                          
Si*Sé (New York City)                                   
$10

                                                                       
Youngblood Brass Band (Madison)        
                                                                                   

Sonotheque                  
11 pm                          
Grupo Okokan (Chicago)                    
$8

                                                                       
DJ Híde (Chicago)

Saturday, Sept. 20

 

Garfield Park Conservatory           
12 pm            (1pm)           
Cool Crooners of Bulawayo (Zimbabwe) FREE

County Fair                                          
(3pm)            Super
Uba (New York City/Dominican Republic)

 

Kids and Kites Festival            
12 pm              
Drum Drum (Papua New Guinea)            
FREE   

 

Rogers Park Festival            
12:30 pm        Taller de Compas 
(Spain)            
FREE

 

Borders Books & Music                       
1 pm                
Maria del Mar Bonet  (Spain)            
FREE

(Michigan Ave.)             

 

Rhythm           
(WORKSHOP)             
2 pm                
Cyro Baptista/Beat The Donkey            
$8

(New York City/Brazil)

 

Borders
Books & Music           
3 pm                       
Si*Sé (New York City)                                   
FREE

(Clark Street)


Saturday, Sept. 20
(cont.)

                                               

Old Town School             
7:30 pm           
Super Uba Y Su Conjunto                     
$12

with El
Bachatin (New York City/

Dominican
Republic)

 

Museum of Contemporary Art       
7:30 pm           
Razbar Ensemble (Iran)               
$12

                                                                       
Jan Yrgagy (Kyrgyzstan)

 

Polish Highlander Hall            
8:30 pm           
Duvo (Hungary)                                
$12

                                                                       
Siumni (Chicago/Poland)                                          

 

HotHouse                                 
9 pm                
Maria del Mar Bonet (Spain)            
$12

                                                                       
Nó em Pingo d’Água (Brazil)

 

Empty Bottle                            
10 pm              
Fiamma Fumana (Italy)              
$12

                                                                       
Zemog (Boston)

 

Martyrs                                    
10 pm              
Beat the Donkey (New York City/Brazil) $10

                                                                       
Chicago Afrobeat Project (Chicago)

 

Park West                                
10 pm              
Spanish Harlem Orchestra (New York City) $15

                                                                       
Issac Delgado (Cuba)

 

Sonotheque                              
11 pm              
Si*Sé (New York City)                                   
$8

                                                                       
DJ Anthony Nicholson (Chicago)

 

Rhythm                                    
11 pm              
Djelimady Tounkara  (Mali)              
$10

 

Sunday, Sept. 21

 

River East Art Center/Ogden Slip 12 pm                    
Nó em Pingo d’Água (Brazil)            
FREE

 

Borders Books & Music                       
1 pm                
Nothembi  (South Africa)             
FREE

(Hyde Park)

 

Borders Books & Music                       
2 pm                
Fiamma Fumana (Italy)              
FREE

(Michigan Ave.)             

 

Chicago Cultural Center              
3 pm                
Kushal Das and Samar Saha (India)  FREE

 

Old Town School             
5 pm                
Duvo (Hungary)                                
$12

                                                           
            Juliano
Milosavljevic Ensemble


(Chicago/Serbia)

 

Riviera Theater                          
7:30 pm           
Youssou N’Dour (Senegal)                    
$25

                                                                       
Nothembi (South Africa)

                                                                       
Djelimady Tounkara (Mali)                                                                          

Sonotheque                              
11 pm              
Dan Boadi & Ghanatta (Chicago/Ghana) $8                                                                            
DJ RikShaw (Chicago)

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Preparations Advance for International Benny Moré Festival

beny_more-small(Prensa Latina – Cumbancha ) Santa Isabel de las Lajas, Cienfuegos.- All Las Lajas seems to be working on preparations for the 14th International Benny Moré Music Festival, to take place here September 11 through 14. Every two years, the people from Lajas, Cienfuegos and Cubans in general get ready to celebrate with a big party, the birth anniversary (this year 84th) of the late musician, rumba star and great improviser. More than 30 bands and singers will play in concert during the four days of the festival, and the scheduled performances include Los Van Van, Isaac Delgado, Equis Alfonso, Pupi y los que Son Son, Elíades Ochoa, Augusto Enriquez and his Mambo Band and the Varela Miranda Family. The performance of Omara Portuondo and her group, Elito Revé, Héctor Téllez, Arte Mixto, the Charanga Cienfueguera, Selección Latina, Los Moddys, Nueva Clave, Estilo Propio, Ecos and the Festival Orchestra is expected. The list of foreign acts announced include the Swedish Calixto Oviedo Band, and Calle Real, Puerto Ricans Manolo Rivera, Truco y Zaperoco and the Coabey Dancers, Aja from Barbados, the Japanese band Cachimba, and Claudia Acuña and La Timba Loca (US). The Festival will open on the morning of September 11, with the traditional pilgrimage to Benny’s tomb.

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From the Roots of Moravian Folklore 

Prague, Czech Republic – Czech label, Indies Records, has released a new album that focuses on the Moravian tradition.

Magic Playing…from the Roots of Moravian Folklore (Indies Records MAM 209) features 13 music bands that represent current day artists who draw from the Moravian folk tradition. They compose or perform their own versions of folk tunes, with new arrangement and thus preserve the creative
link between the musical past and future thereby strengthening the original and unique culture of the Czech lands.

Bands and individual artists with a long tradition, Hradišťan, Iva Bittová, Teagrass, Tomáš Kočko, appear on the CD along with young, beginning musicians (Maraca, Docuku, Benedikta) who still discover the beauty of folk songs.The focus of the album is not to survey the entire range of this musical branch so popular nowadays. It simply tries to give the listeners at home and abroad an idea about Moravian world music.

The booklet comes in 4 languages:  English, French, German, and Czech. An MP# is available at:
free MP3 – Muziga.. 

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Cast Your Nomination to the National Recording Registry Today

Washingon
DC, USA – There isn’t much time left and you’ll need to act quickly if you want the
chance to nominate your favorite recording to the National Recording Registry. 
The deadline is set for September 1, 2003. 

The National Recording Preservation Act of 2000 was a bill that created the
National Recording Registry, part of the Library of Congress.  This registry is
responsible for  the preservation of “sound recordings and collections of sound
recordings that are culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant, and
for other purposes” (Public Law 106-474; H.R.4846).”

Go to
http://www.loc.gov/rr/record/nrpb/
and follow the directions to check out
the rules and cast your nomination.  This site also features a link to view the
2002 list on the registry.
 

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Toi Toi by Thomas Mapfumo & The Blacks Unlimited

Thomas Mapfumo and the Blacks Unlimited – Toi Toi (Protest)
Thomas Mapfumo and the Blacks Unlimited

Toi Toi (Protest) (aNOnym ReCOrds, 2003)

With lyrics that encompass Mapfumo‘s strong sense of social activism and pleas for divine intervention, Toi Toi (Protest), released on aNOnym ReCOrds, is a musical journey through the sometimes desperate human landscape of Zimbabwe, all wrapped up in the rhythmic elegance of Africa.

Mapfumo, marked as a revolutionary hero in his native Zimbabwe, continues his social and political crusade on Toi Toi with songs such as “Pasi Inhaka” (This World), “Vechidiki” (Youngsters) and “Musha Wenyu” (Your Home) that speak of the suffering that continues there and the need for help.

Backing up Thomas Mapfumo with Lancelot Mapfumo, Christopher Muchabaiwa, Mavis Mapfumo and Firista Bisiwasi on vocals is the incomparable The Blacks Unlimited and Friends. Chaka Mhembere and Bezil Makombe are the group’s mbira players with Zivai Guveya taking electric and acoustic guitars, marimba, mbira and vocals.

Percussion is rounded out with Lancelot Mapfumo, Christopher Muchabaiwa, Gilbert Zvamaida, Marven Sarutawa and Njwaki Batista Nyoni. Tsepo Makhaza plays bass; Banning Eyre on acoustic and electric guitar plays a couple of tracks; Gilbert Zvamaida is heard on the Zimbabwean sessions and Paul Prince plays guitar on Musha Wenyu. The brass section is rounded out with Brooks Barnett on trumpet; David Rhodes on tenor saxophone; Ohj Tavallai and Abel Chipango on trombone and Philip Mandizvidza Svosve on saxophone. Lancelot Mapfumo and Philip Domingo play keyboards.

Mapfumo fans will take quickly to upbeat “Timothy” and “Dande.” The charming ease of tracks “Komborera” (Bless) and “Ndateterera” (I Am Pleading) are musical proof that Mapfumo make even the most heartfelt appeal for change dignified and delightful at the same time.

Toi Toi opens the mind and the heart and hopefully makes change possible.

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Rough Guide Boxed Sets

Asian Beat Box
Asian Beat Box
San Francisco, USA – The producers of the Rough Guide series have compiled several of the individual CDs to create thematic boxed sets. Each box contains 4 titles. The first boxed sets are:

American Roots Box.

Included titles: 1) RGNET1028CD The Rough Guide To Cajun & Zydeco, 2) RGNET1059CD The Rough Guide To Bluegrass, 3) RGNET1087CD The Rough Guide To Delta Blues, 4) RGNET1090CD The Rough Guide To Gospel.

Arabic Beat Box. Included titles:

1) RGNET1064CD The Rough Guide To Sufi Music, 2) RGNET1085CD The Rough Guide To Bellydance, 3) RGNET1093CD The Rough Guide To Arabesque, 4) RGNET1100CD The Rough Guide To Rai.

Asian Beat Box. Included titles:

1) RGNET1054CD The Rough Guide To Bhangra, 2) RGNET1074CD The Rough Guide To Bollywood, 3) RGNET1091CD The Rough Guide To The Music Of India, 4) RGNET1096CD The Rough Guide To The Asian Underground.

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Your Connection to traditional and contemporary World Music including folk, roots and various types of global fusion