Tag Archives: Dona Onete

WOMAD Gran Canaria 2019 Set for November 7-10

World music festival WOMAD Gran Canaria-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria will present 32 artists from four continents November 7-10, 2019 in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.

The international lineup includes Ghanaian artist Pat Thomas, Brazilian diva Dona Onete, Iranian-born Afghan Elaha Soroor with the duo Kefaya, Altin Gün, DJ Mam, Hanggai, Jungle by Night, Nayaband, Sofiane Saidi & Mazaldd, Tupinamba and Trans Sound Kabar.

The Spanish mainland artists this year are Novedades Carminha, Lorena Álvarez and The Limboos.

The concerts will take place at the Santa Catalina and Boulevard stages and the emerging Canary Islander artists will have their own space LPAJuventud @ WOMAD, at the Plaza de Canarias.

Atlántida

The Canary Island’s presence includes six groups and soloists at the two main stages:  Althay Páez, Atlántida, Birkins with Álvaro Suite, Fajardo, Lajalada and Toto Noriega.

Among the fortnight of planned activities, a set of film screenings with seven feature films and three short films will show contemporary visions of Africa.

There will be dancing and percussion in the workshops for adults and children that will be taught by Peruvian Mariella Köhn with percussionist Walter Sánchez.

The commemoration of the arrival of man on the moon will be disseminated in various activities of the Elder Museum and in children’s workshops.

It is an artistic roster that perfectly condenses the essence of WOMAD and that will offer a magnificent sound and cultural map of the world in a unique communion of tradition and innovation, because culture is history, but also evolution, and that responds to this programming ”, assured festival director Dania Dévora in her presentation.

The mayor of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Augusto Hidalgo, expressed his happiness for the new edition of the festival: “We are tremendously happy with this new edition, to which the Government of the Canary Islands finally joins more firmly. We also add value with a new stage for emerging bands that was born from an initiative of the City Council of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria through its Department of Youth ”, referring to the new emerging bands stage, LPAJuventud @ WOMAD.

Likewise, the president of the Cabildo (island government) de Gran Canaria, Antonio Morales, expressed his commitment to the WOMAD festival, which he has described as one of the “great events” national and international. “There are no events of the transcendence of multiculturalism like WOMAD,” he said.

Finally, the president of the Canary Islands regional Government, Ángel Víctor Torres, expressed his delight to contribute to the celebration of this festival that has, in his words, “a transcendence that exceeds music, as it contains values ​​that we share, of multiculturalism, inclusion and also has great economic value for the city and the island.”

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Brazil’s Dona Onete Tops the September 2019 Transglobal World Music Chart

The album Rebujo by Amazon-based Brazilian artist Dona Onete has reached the number 1 position in September 2019 at the Transglobal World Music Chart. More about Dona Onete.

Dona Onete – Rebujo

The September 2019 Chart

  1. Dona Onete – Rebujo – AmpliDiversão / Mais Um
  2. Cimarrón – Orinoco – Cimarrón Music
  3. Mara Aranda – Sefarad en el Corazón de Turquía – Mara Aranda
  4. Boban Marković Orkestar – Mrak – Fonó
  5. Angelique Kidjo – Celia – Verve / Universal Music France
  6. Mísia – Pura Vida (Banda Sonora) – Galileo Music Communication
  7. Oumar Konate – I Love You Inna – Clermont Music
  8. Africa Express – Egoli – Africa Express
  9. Lajkó Félix & Vołosi – Lajkó Félix & Vołosi – Fonó
  10. Refugees for Refugees – Amina – Muziekpublique
  11. Minyo Crusaders – Echoes of Japan – Mais Um
  12. AKA Trio – Joy – Bendigedig
  13. Tuuletar – Rajatila / Borderline – Bafe’s Factory
  14. Janusz Prusinowski Kompania – Po Śladach / In the Footsteps – Słuchaj Uchem / Buda Musique
  15. Santana – Africa Speaks – Concord
  16. Parno Graszt – Már Nem Szédülök / Rolling Back – Fonó
  17. Rhiannon Giddens with Francesco Turrisi – There Is No Other – Nonesuch
  18. Yolla Khalife – On the Road – Nagam
  19. Oum – Daba – Lof Music / MDC
  20. Kronos Quartet, Mahsa & Marjan Vahdat – Placeless – Kirkelig Kulturverksted

More about the chart: www.transglobalwmc.com

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Artist Profiles: Dona Onete

Dona Onete – Photo by Adriano Fagundes

Dona Onete was born on June 18, 1939 in Cachoeira do Ararí, located in the delta of the Amazon River, across from Belém. She grew up further down the river, in Igarapé Miri, 100km away from Belém, where she regularly attended local dances of carimbó, siriá and banguê. She explains she only started to sing suitably at the age of 11. “I used to spend the whole day on the river banks, washing clothes. One day, I saw a dolphin and thought that I should sing for him. The next day I sang again, and another came, and another, and soon a whole family of dolphins came to listen!”

By the age of fifteen, she was singing samba, quadrilhas, boi bumba and other northeastern Brazilian genres in the bars of her hometown. “One of my biggest musical influences are Marajoara, local cowboys who improvise songs. They turn common phrases into beautiful poetry and whenever I write a song, I remember them”.

She became a Professor of History and Amazonian Studies in Igaparé Miri and passionately researched the rhythms, dances and traditions of the indigenous and black people of the area. This led her to form several music and dance groups, which regenerated traditional customs, and that eventually saw her elected as the Municipal Secretary of Culture of Igaparé-Miri. “I helped local musicians and local culture that people didn’t value. I have the chance to help Amazonian communities through my music so I cannot just sing and close my eyes to the people’s plight.”

Dona Onete – Photo by Adriano Fagundes

Absorbing multiple genres and rhythms, Dona Onete also began to compose, creating the hybrid genre for which she would later become famous, the carimbó chamegado.

Carimbó is a rhythm and dance from Pará, influenced by both African and European traditions. However, Onete has her own vision of the genre – carimbó chamegado: “I took lundum and carimbó, two wonderful genres, and mixed them with the rhythm of the songs from the slaves to create carimbó chamegado. It’s slower and more sensual than carimbó,” she adds. She composed throughout her career over 300 songs, but it was not until she retired that her musical career took off, and even then, it was only by accident.

She and her second husband moved to the quiet area of Pedreira in Belém, with the intention of relaxing the rest of their days, singing as she always had done, for her own pleasure. A local band heard her singing though and she claims, “thought I was a young woman, because my songs are pretty cheeky. But when they caught sight of me they were shocked to see a lady of my age!”

Dona Onete – Photo by Adriano Fagundes

Her age and spicy sense of humor was undeniably part of the charm for this band who invited her to sing with them. Believing herself to be past her prime, Dona Onete initially rejected the offer but she agreed eventually and before long, she had become something of a cult figure in Belém. “Sometimes, when you think you’ve given all you’ve got, you realize that, in fact, you have a lot more ahead of you,” she stated.

She recorded her debut album Feitiço Caboclo aged 73 and an international release from Mais Um Discos in 2014 saw critics fall immediately for this high-spirited, saucy and sexy septuagenarian. Dona Onete received invitations to perform at high profile world music festivals and venues: WOMAD UK, Paris’s Cabaret Sauvage, and Portugal’s FMM Sines in 2015.

On Banzeiro, Onete proved that age is nothing but a number as she increased the tempo with tracks such as the banguê that is the title track plus the lively carimbó ‘Faceira’, among others. Banzeiro is the wave created by boats as they pass through the river.

After Banzeiro, Onete’s reputation has blossomed in Brazil. She performs throughout the country to mostly young audiences. She composed and sung the theme song for one of Brazil’s leading soap operas (A Força do Querer) and was awarded the Brazilian Ordem do Mérito Cultural in recognition for her contribution to Brazilian culture. She also plays benefit shows for endangered Amazonian tribes.

In 2019 she released Rebujo an album that features styles born in Belém: carimbós and bangues, as well as cumbia, romantic brega and samba. The album includes numerous Amazonian allusions: the piranha (Festa do Tubarão), mango-scented ticks (Vem Chamegar), biting tucandeira ants (Balanço do Açaí), African deities such as Borocô (Tambor do Norte) and banho de cheiro: an herbal bath used to ward off evil spirits (Mistura Pai D’Égua).

The title Rebujo is the name for the turbulence in a river created as currents pass through. The rebujo raises silt and detritus from the riverbed giving the Amazon its muddy color – and making the waters unsafe for swimmers.

Dona Onete produced Rebujo with long-time collaborator Pio Lobato (guitar) and also includes Breno Oliveira on bass, Marcos Sarrazin on saxophone, Vovô Batera on drums, and JP Cavalcante on percussion.

Dona Onete has gone from playing small bars in her hometown to thousand capacity shows across Brazil and some of Europe’s most respected festivals. “My energy comes from the river,” she says. “It’s like blood rushing through my veins, there’s no stopping it – or me

Discography:

Feitiço Caboclo (Na Music, 2012)
Banzeiro ( Mais Um Discos/Na Music, 2017)
Rebujo (Mais Um Discos, 2019)

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Dona Onete Releases Festa do Tubarão Video Shot in the Amazon

Celebrated Brazilian singer Dona Onete, who is set to turn 80 this year, has released a new single titled Festa do Tubarão – Shark Party as a digital single. The song is also available as an extended 6-minute video that takes the viewer on a wild ride through her hometown of Belem.

The track appears on her upcoming album Rebujo, scheduled for release May 24, 2019. Festa do Tubarão tells the story of a shark that swims into Belem’s Guajará Bay to have fun, unperturbed by the legend of the “Boiúna” – the giant snake who lives in the river, or the local piranha and traira fish.

The video begins with footage shot on Ilha do Combú, a forested island just south of Belem. Festa do Tubarão was filmed in various locations in the area of Belem and offers a look into this relatively unfamiliar corner of Brazil.

Brazilian directors Lírio Ferreira (co-director of Baile Perfumado) and Natara Ney take the viewers to Belem’s Ver-o-Peso – one of Brazil’s most vibrant markets – where we find legendary local herb-seller ‘aunt’ Coló. Then we fly through the city to Dona Onete’s home before visiting the Amazônia Legal marina where the ‘shark party’ is in full swing – until Onete is transported 70km to the north east of Belem to the “Boi de Máscaras” carnival in São Caetano de Odivelas where the cabeçudos (big heads) and pierrôs (sad clowns) dance with her accompanied by carnival brass-band Fanfarra Marajoara.

The title of the new album, Rebujo, is a local slang for the currents in the Amazon river that carry silt and nutrients from the river bed into the water, feeding its inhabitants and giving the river its muddy color – however, as it gives, it also takes, and the rebujo can easily overpower even the most experienced swimmer. The album featured genres such as carimbós, high energy bangues, cumbia, brega and samba.

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Dona Onete’s Sensual Songs from the Amazon

Dona Onete – Banzeiro (Mais Um Discos, 2017)

An album by charismatic Brazilian Amazonian singer Dona Onete. Her songs are about seduction, plants that make your body ‘agitate’ and stories related to the Amazon. The septuagenarian artist is enjoying new popularity in her country and abroad thanks to international releases like Banzeiro.

On Banzeiro, Dona Onete delivers infectious Brazilian rhythms like bangue and a style she developed called carimbó chamegado where she combined two genres called lundum and carimbó. She mixed them with the rhythm of the songs from the slaves. Dona Onete describes carimbó chamegado as slower and sexier than carimbó.

Buy Banzeiro

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