Tag Archives: Garifuna music

Belize’s Garifuna Collective Reveals 2019 Tour Dates

The Garifuna Collective

The Garifuna Collective, Belize’s acclaimed Afro-Indigenous roots music band will be touring Europe and North America in support of its new album, Aban, this summer. This will be its first major international tour since 2014.

Aban is set for worldwide release June 21st, 2019 on Belize’s Stonetree Records. The European part of The Garifuna Collective’s tour will begin on June 6th in the Netherlands, with stops at Denmark’s Roskilde Festival, Norway’s Førde Festival, and YAAM Berlin.

The North American tour will begin on July 12th in Montana, with stops at the Calgary Folk Fest, The Cleveland Museum of Art, and New York City’s Summerstage.

The Garifuna Collective released its previous album, Ayo in 2016.

The Garifuna people are descendants of Afro-indigenous people from the Caribbean island of St Vincent who were exiled to Central America by the British in the 18th century.

The Garifuna Collective 2019 Tour Dates:

Europe:

June 6 – Afro-Pfingsten, Winterthur, NL
June 7 – YAAM, Berlin, DE
June 8 – IMMF, Nijmegen, NL
June 15 – Ethno Port Festival, Poznan, PL
June 22 – Wales, UK (Venue TBA)
June 23 – Liverpool, UK (Venue TBA)
June 28 – Lent Festival, Maribor, SI
June 29 – Fusion Festival, Lärz, DE
July 5 – Roskilde Festival, DK
July 6 – Førde Festival, NO
July 7 – Afrika Festival, Hertme, NL

North America:

July 12 – Montana Folk Festival, Butte, MO
July 20 – Grassroots Festival, Trumansburg, NY
July 21 – Schenectady Central Park, Schenectady, NY
July 24 – Cleveland Music of Art, Cleveland, OH
July 25 – Calgary Folk Fest, Calgary, AB
August 2 – Summerstage, New York, NY
Aug 16 – Invermere Festival, BC
Aug 17 – Salmon Arm Festival, Salmon Arm, BC
Aug 22 – Portland, ME – TBA
Aug 23 – Bangor, ME – TBA

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Africa Oyé Announces Headliners for 2019 festival

The Garifuna Collective from Belize and celebrated reggae artist Horace Andy will headline the 27th annual Africa Oyé festival this summer in the UK.

Africa Oyé will take place June 22 and 23, 2019 in Liverpool’s Sefton Park.  The festival celebrates the music and culture of Africa and the Diaspora with two free days of live music, DJ sets and multi-arts workshops.

Horace Andy

Jamaican singer-songwriter Horace Andy is well-known as the sweetest voice in reggae and for his long association with British trip-hop forerunners, Massive Attack. Andy has become an persevering voice on the Jamaican music scene. His early 1970s hit, ‘Skylarking’ expressed his ability to deliver songs of Black determination and social commentary that topped the Jamaican charts.

Horace Andy has steadily recorded and performed around the world in his own right with his band Dub Asante, and has remained famous in roots reggae, rocksteady, lovers rock and dancehall.

The Garifuna Collective

Also announced for the 2019 festival is The Garifuna Collective. The group has pushed the boundaries of Garifuna musical traditions. The group went back to the studio last year ro record its new album Hamala (Let Them Fly). It will The Garifuna Collective’s first record since the highly-praised tribute album to fallen bandleader and cultural icon Andy Palacio. The new album experiments with new Garifuna rhythms, recording concepts and even some “organic electronic” music and dub techniques.

The two festival headliners join a line-up that already includes BCUC, Moonlight Benjamin, Sofiane Saidi & Mazalda, Carlou D and OSHUN, as well as Liverpool emerging stars Tabitha Jade and Satin Beige who make up the ‘Oyé Introduces’ program.

Africa Oyé’s Artistic Director said: “It’ll be a real honor to welcome back The Garifuna Collective to headline Oyé in their own right after their amazing performance with the late, great Andy Palacio twelve years ago; their sound and energy is incredible. And Horace Andy is a reggae headliner we’ve always wanted to see on our stage and I just know he’ll close out the Saturday in perfect style.”

For more information on the festival visit africaoye.com.

headline photo Trenchtown by Mark McNulty

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Artist Profiles: Mohobub Flores

Percussionist and singer Mohobub Flores was born in Dandriga, cultural and musical capital of the Garifuna community of Belize and birthplace of Pen Cayetano, a musician and painter who founded the Turtle Shell Band in the 1980s and fused traditional Garifuna music to popularize what was called “punta rock.”

Mohobub started his career as a percussionist in 1979 and belongs to the generation responsible for projecting the music of this ethnic group onto the international scene.

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Artist Profiles: Pen Cayetano

Garifuna artist Delvin “Pen” Cayetano was born in 1954 in Dangriga, Belize. In the late 1970s, Pen Cayetano began to compose songs in the Garifuna language. He added the rhythm of the electric guitar to the traditional punta rhythm and created what is now known as punta-rock, the “rock” being the rhythm of the guitar.

Cayetano’s creation caught on quickly in Belize and from there spread to the other Central American countries.

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Artist Profiles: Garifuna All Star Band

The Garifuna All Star Band was a once in a lifetime collaboration of the biggest stars of Garifuna music, such as Andy Palacio and Paul Nabor from Belize. For the first time, these musicians from diverse backgrounds were assembled into a dynamic group to portray the vibrant aspects of traditional and modern Garifuna music and culture.

The Garifuna All Star Band performed a modern fusion of the punta, the highly danceable punta rock, as well as the intense semi-sacred Hungu-Hungu. Also in their music was the Latin bluesy parranda style.

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Artist Profiles: Paul Nabor

Paul Nabor

Alfonso Palacio, better known as Paul Nabor, was born January 26, 1928 in Punta Gorda, Belize. He was a legend in Parranda songs accompanied by drumming, percussion and acoustic guitar, very much like the Caribbean Calypso. He was also a sort of spiritual leader with the voice of age and wisdom.

Though nominally Roman Catholic, many Garifuna practice African spiritual traditions. The dugu, honouring the Garinagu ancestors is the most important tradition, where feasting, music and dance go on for days.

Paul Nabor was also the last living Parrandero in Punta Gorda, a small coastal village in southern Belize. He woke up at five every morning to fish in the Caribbean, and in the evenings he served as religious leader at the old wooden Garifuna temple before his gigs at the local club, which often ran nearly into the next morning.

Paul Nabor died October 22, 2014 in Punta Gorda, Belize.

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Artist Profiles: Andy Palacio

Andy Palacio – Photo by Yuquilla

Andy Palacio was not only the most popular musician in Belize, he was also a serious music and cultural archivist with a deep commitment to preserving his unique Garifuna culture. Long a leading proponent of Garifuna popular music and a tireless advocate for the maintenance of the Garifuna language and traditions, Palacio was one of the founders of the Garifuna Collective.

Born and raised in the coastal village of Barranco, Palacio grew up listening to traditional Garifuna music as well as imported sounds coming over the radio from neighboring Honduras, Guatemala, the Caribbean and the United States. “Music was always a part of daily life,” said Palacio, “It was the soundtrack that we lived to.” Along with some of his peers, he joined local bands even while in high school and began developing his own voice, performing covers of popular Caribbean and Top 40 songs.

However, it was while working with a literacy project on Nicaragua’s Atlantic Coast in 1980 and discovering that the Garifuna language and culture was steadily dying in that country, that a strong cultural awareness took hold and his approach to music became more defined. “I saw what had happened to my people in Nicaragua. The cultural erosion I saw there deeply affected my outlook,” he said, “and I definitely had to react to that reality.”

His reaction took the form of diving deeper into the language and rhythms of the Garifuna, a unique cultural blend of West African and Indigenous Carib and Arawak Indian language and heritage. “It was a conscious strategy. I felt that music was an excellent medium to preserve the culture. I saw it as a way of maintaining cultural pride and self-esteem, especially in young people.”

Palacio became a leading figure in a growing renaissance of young Garifuna intellectuals who were writing poetry and songs in their native language. He saw the emergence of an upbeat, popular dance form based on Garifuna rhythms that became known as punta rock and enthusiastically took part in developing the form.

Palacio began performing his own songs and gained stature as a musician and energetic Garifuna artist. In 1987, he was able to hone his skills after being invited to work in England with Cultural Partnerships Limited, a community arts organization.

Returning home to Belize with new skills and a four track recording system, he helped found Sunrise, an organization dedicated to preserving, documenting and distributing Belizean music. While his academic background and self-scholarship allowed for his on-going documentation of Garifuna culture through lyrics and music, it has been his exuberance as a performer that gained him world-wide recognition.

Since 1988, Andy Palacio gained enormous popularity both in Belize and abroad, playing before audiences in the Caribbean, the Americas and Europe and Asia. These include performances at the Transmusicales Encounters in France, Carifesta in Trinidad and Tobago and in St. Kitts-Nevis, World Music Expo Essen 2002, the Rainforest World Music Festival in Malaysia, Antillanse Feesten in Belgium, HeimatKlange in Germany, the World Traditional Performing Arts Festival in Japan and several others in the United States, Mexico, Canada, Colombia and the U.K.

Around 2002, Belizean producer/musician Ivan Duran, Palacio’s longtime collaborator and founder of Belize’s pioneer label Stonetree Records, convinced Palacio that he should focus on less commercial forms of Garifuna music and look more deeply into its soul and roots.

Duran and Palacio set out to create an all-star, multi-generational ensemble of some of the best Garifuna musicians from Guatemala, Honduras and Belize. The Collective united elder statesmen such as legendary Garifuna composer Paul Nabor, with young parranda star Aurelio Martinez from Honduras. Rather then focusing on danceable styles like punta rock, the Collective explores the more soulful side of Garifuna music, such as the Latin-influenced parranda as well as the punta and gunjei rhythms.

Andy Palacio – Watina

Watina, the debut album of Andy Palacio & the Garifuna Collective, was released in February of 2007 on the Cumbancha record label. The initial recording sessions for this exceptional album took place over a 4-month period in an improvised studio inside a thatch-roofed cabin by the sea in the small village of Hopkins, Belize. It was an informal environment, where the musicians spent many hours playing together late into the night, honing the arrangements of the songs that would eventually end up on this album.

While the traditions provided the inspiration, the musicians also added contemporary elements that helped give the songs relevance to their modern context. After the sessions, Ivan Duran worked tirelessly back at his studio to craft what is surely the pinnacle of Garifuna music production to date. “The idea of the collective has been a long time in the making,” said Palacio. “The chemistry of working with different Garifuna artists, not only within Belize but also from Guatemala and Honduras, was quite appealing and very satisfying to the soul.”

Andy Palacio lived in Belize where he worked in promoting Culture and the Arts. In December 2004, he was appointed Cultural Ambassador and Deputy Administrator of the National Institute of Culture and History.

Andy Palacio died January 19, 2008, of a heart stroke.

Discography:

Greatest Hits (1979)
Keimoun (beat on) (1995)
Til Da Mawnin (1997)
Wátina (Cumbancha, 2007)

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Aurelio Martinez: Music of Love, Culture of Love

Aurelio Martinez takes up space in the room even when he is seated. He speaks without hesitation and with big clear gestures. I had wanted to speak with him ever since catching an ecstatic live performance at the Global Beat Festival in New York a couple of years ago. By the end of that concert everyone was on their feet.

Aurelio is a guitarist, percussionist, composer and singer. Darandi is his fourth album (released on Real World Records in February 2017). It represents the best of his thirty years in music. This album captures the live sound of his performance. The musicians were all recorded in one room. So, its lively and real, rather than the precise, overdubbed sound of his previous albums.

Aurelio – Darandi

To understand Aurelio’s music, you need to know his background. He grew up and spent his childhood in Plaplaya, Honduras, surrounded by Garifuna music. Indeed, he is one of the Garifuna peoples’ strongest Ambassadors. Garifuna music is closer to West African music than to rock; it’s closer to folk than New Orleans jazz. Sometimes, it’s as melancholy as the blues, but always it owes more to Africa than to Europe.

Much of the music has a percussive undercurrent that both grounds it and helps to propel the music forward. The segunda is a bass drum that is at the core of much Garifuna music. Aurelio has a very evocative voice, even if as a listener you cannot understand his vocal, you feel there is true heart in what he is singing

He is a master of Paranda music, a sub-genre within Garifuna music, that is blues-like in feel, and its lyrics, like the blues, often convey a lively commentary on society.

The Garifuna people are the descendants of African slaves who were first bought to St. Vincent in the West Indies and the Arawak Indians. While in St. Vincent, they fought the English colonizers, who killed many of them, the ones who survived were taken to Punta Gorda, Belize. I spoke to him recently about his music, his childhood, and the Garifuna. His conversation is as upbeat as his music.

DJL: Can you tell me about your childhood?

AM: Yes, my mother was a singer and composer of Garifuna music. She represents fifty to a hundred percent of my music, even now when I compose. She is my best mentor. My father was a guitarist. My grandfather too was a musician with the local community band. My music school was my family.

 

Aurelio Martinez in 2010 at Forde Festival in Norway – Photo by Angel Romero

 

DJL: How did you come to play guitar?

AM: I made my first guitar out of fish line and pieces of wood. (He chuckles.) You know how you come to find toys sometimes. I was about six years old. I first wanted to play the saxophone, because my uncle was a saxophonist. But when I was 15 years old, my Dad, who had moved to America, sent me my first professional guitar.

DJL: The biography on your website describes you as a singer, guitarist and percussionist, but one aspect that is sadly missing, is your incredible dancing. You can get everyone in the audience on their feet, even coming up on the stage to take turns dancing. Sparks fly during a performance. Can you talk to me about your dancing?

AM: Yes, you know when I hear drums, it is impossible for me not to dance. I used to hold onto my grandmother’s skirt as she danced at parties. And you know the dancing is sensual, I was watching all of that as a young boy. I was taking it all in. In Garifuna culture, we have celebrations where both the young and old come together. When I was little – seven or eight – drumming was my special weapon.

I would say to the adults, ‘if you are not inviting me to the party, I am not playing drums.’ I used the fact that I could play percussion to negotiate invitations to come to parties.

DJL: What would you like to say about Garifuna culture to someone who knows nothing about it?

AM: On April 12th this year, we will have our annual celebration that marks 286 years of our living in Central America. Garifuna people are extended into four places: Belize, Honduras, Guatemala and Nicaragua. We have a huge Garifuna population in the United States, half a million people. We have food, language, spirituality and music that are all unique to us.

DJL: Are you fighting to preserve this culture?

AM: Yes, of course, the government in Honduras is a threat. They want to convert our community to a tourist place by building hotels on our land. Previously, the Christians said we were diabolical. We have been forbidden to speak our language. We face discrimination and oppression. Yet, we are keeping this culture alive. My band takes our pride around the world, we convey to people a culture that is both powerful and rich. The soul of Garifuna is about bringing people together, in peace and harmony. I am a spirit, the music comes through me. I want to be true in my music. I sing what I feel.

 

Andy Palacio

 

DJL: You met Andy Palacio, who was a known Garifuna musician and a leading activist, who fought hard for the people, before dying at aged 47. Can you describe him?

AM: Yes, we met in Honduras. He was a brother. It was a friendship. We agreed on many things about the Garifuna people, we saw eye to eye, and he loved his culture. We worked on music together. When I first stepped on the beach in Senegal, West Africa, after he died, I was moved. I knew that Andy would have been there with me in Senegal, if he were still alive. His spirit was with me that day on the beach.

DJL: This album Darandi represents your whole career, why now?

AM: It is about closing one part of my musical life, and a renewal, moving into more powerful music. I want to work with other, different musicians, who play jazz or Afropop. I want to open the music up.

DJL: Yalifu is a powerful track on this album. Yalifu is a song of longing. Can you talk about it?

AM: Yalifu means pelican, and in the song I ask, “pelican, lend me your wings so that I can fly.” This is a love song about wanting to fly to my father, who at that time was far from me in America. It was written as I was remembering being young in Honduras and missing my father. The song also speaks to bigger issues of immigration, borders, loss, and longing, how people should have the chance to move freely around the world.

DJL: Landini is also another evocative track.

AM: Yes, it is a song about my reconnecting to my home town, Plaplaya. When I sing that song, the image of my home town appears in my mind: the river, the birds, the boats coming in.

DJL: And finally, what is your hope for the Garifuna people?

AM: Do you know that in 2001, UNESCO proclaimed the language, music, and dance of Garifuna as a masterpiece of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity? We love to live in community, not to fight. A grandfather is a grandfather to our whole community. Come to the Garifuna nation to see. I welcome you. I know that we will continue as a spiritual people with our music of love, our culture of love.

To read more about Aurelio and his discography, read his Artist Profile.

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Darandi Celebrates 30 Years of Garifuna Icon Aurelio Martinez

Aurelio – Darandi (Real World Records, 2017)

Honduran singer-songwriter Aurelio Martinez’s fourth album celebrates his thirty years as a performer and defender of Garifuna culture with this new album titled Darandi. The recording was made at Real World Records while Aurelio and his band were on tour in the UK. The idea was to capture the live feel of the band.

The song selection includes Aurelio’s best known and most popular songs from throughout his career, a mix of originals and new versions of traditional Garifuna songs sung in the Garifuna language.

Although Aurelio has played various forms of music throughout the past decades, including punta rock, this album focuses on a more traditional form called parranda (the English language writers call it paranda). Parranda is a Spanish word that has several meanings, but it’s always connected to musicians and partying at night. The Garifuna form of parranda is characterized by vocals, acoustic percussion and guitars.

Aurelio’s style features a unique electric guitar sound that has African, Latin American, blues, and surf influences. It’s played by Guayo Cedeño, one of Honduras’ best guitarists.

One of Aurelio’s main goals is to reach Garifuna youth. “I want young Garifuna people to hear the problems they are living with reflected in my songs, and dance with those same problems.” In his songs, he references subjects such as safe sex and migration to the United States. He passionately hopes that the children who aren’t learning to speak the Garifuna language will be inspired by his music to sing in their traditional language.

The album comes packaged in a beautiful hard cover book with an extensive biography, photographs, illustrations and details about Garifuna culture. There is also a history of the Garifuna people and how they ended up in various countries in Central America. The booklet includes a map that shows the migration progress starting from African slave ship wrecks. Although the map indicates that it was two Spanish slave ships, this is not settled fact and other sources point to a Dutch slave ship expedition or even Portuguese slave ships.

Currently, the Garifuna live in about 50 towns on Central America’s Caribbean coast, extending from Belize down through Guatemala and Honduras all the way to Nicaragua. Although the Garifuna still share a common culture, the Garifuna language is disappearing. And the culture is under threat by religious missionaries and commercial interests connected to the tourism industry.

The lineup on the album includes Aurelio Martinez on lead vocals, acoustic guitar, maracas; Guayo Cedeño on lead electric guitar; Emilio Alvarez on bass; Onan Castillo on Garifuna drum (primero); Joel Martinez on Garifuna drum (segundo); Desiree Diego on backing vocals; Chela Torres on backing vocals; and Sheldon Petillo on backing vocals.

Darandi is a beautiful-crafted set of songs by the leading Garifuna artist at this time.

Buy Darandi in the Americas

Buy Darandi in Europe

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Artist Profiles: Aurelio Martinez

Aurelio Martinez

Following in the footsteps of the legendary Parranderos from the Caribbean coast of Central America, and the great Andy Palacio, with an enchanting blend of African and Latin acoustic roots, Aurelio Martinez emerged as one of the most exceptional Garifuna artists of his generation.

Acclaimed for both his preservation and modernization of the Parranda musical tradition. In 2008, he was selected by the great African musician, Youssou N’Dour, to join the prestigious Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative.

Aurelio Martinez was born into a family possessing a long and distinguished musical tradition in the small Garifuna community of Plaplaya in Honduras. He began playing guitar as soon as he was old enough to hold the instrument.

By the age of six he was regularly playing drums at social gatherings. Inspired by his grandmother and his father, he gathered a vast repertoire, which later enabled him to develop his own style.

He was an original member of the Garifuna All Star Band and worked and recorded with the legendary Andy Palacio. Along with Palacio, Rolando Sosa, Lugua Centeno, Chela Torres, Justo Miranda and others he recorded the Garifuna Soul album produced by Ivan Duran, a worldwide hit.

 

 

In 2017, Aurelio released Darandi, a selection of Aurelio’s favorite songs from his career, newly recorded. The CD is packaged as a 24-page hardback book with extended liner notes, archive photographs and illustrations.

 

Discography:

Garifuna Soul (Stonetree Records, 2006)
Laru Beya (Sub Pop/Next Ambiance NXA 002, 2011)
Lándini (Real World Records, 2014)
Darandi (Real World Records, 2017)

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