Artist Profiles: Sahba Motallebi

Sahba Motallebi
Sahba Motallebi

Sahba Motallebi is recognized internationally as a modern expert of the Iranian tar and setar, lute-type stringed instruments that are essential to one of the world’s great musical traditions. Sahba started studying music as a young girl in Sari, a small coastal city in the north of Iran.

In 1993, at the age of 14, she initiated her studies at the Tehran Conservatory of Music, where she was recognized as Best Tar Player at the Iranian Music Festival for four consecutive years.

After graduating in 1997, Sahba Motallebi helped found the pioneering women’s music ensemble Chakaveh. In 1999, Motallebi was invited to join the Iranian National Orchestra.

In 2003, Motallebi left Iran to pursue graduate studies in music in Russia, Turkey, and the United States and has lived near Los Angeles for the past years. She continues to perform worldwide, and has released several CDs and published two books on Iranian classical music.

Sahba Motallebi is also much-admired as an innovator in music education, with her online instructional materials and courses reaching students throughout the world.

Discography:

Presentation of Young Artists (2003)
Dashti-Nava (2005)
Solace of the eyes (2006),
Ever lasting songs of Iran Vol. I & II (2001)
Ancient Heritage anew (2011)
Dream and Illusion (2012)
A Tear at the Crossroad of Time (2014)

Author: Angel Romero

Angel Romero y Ruiz has been writing about world music music for many years. He founded the websites worldmusiccentral.org and musicasdelmundo.com. Angel produced several TV specials for Metropolis (TVE) and co-produced “Musica NA”, a music show for Televisión Española (TVE) in Spain that featured an eclectic mix of world music, fusion, electronica, new age and contemporary classical music. Angel also produced and remastered world music albums, compilations and boxed sets for Alula Records, Ellipsis Arts, Music of the World.

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