Tag Archives: Russian folk music

Renaissance of the Vargan

Vladimir Markov – Out of time. Russian jew’s harp music

Vladimir Markov – Out of time. Russian jew’s harp music (Sketis Music, SKMR-126, 2017)

The jew’s harp had disappeared in Russia until Vladimir Markov (Владимир Марков) and other enthusiasts revived it. Markov, a musician from Irkutsk conducted research and started playing the vargan, the Russian jew’s harp in the 1990s.

Out of time – Russian jew’s harp music (Вне времён. Русская варганная музыка) is Markov’s vision of how the vargan was used. It’s a fascinating album of traditional Russian folk songs adapted to jew’s harp.

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Artist Profiles: Reelroad

Reelroad in 2008

Reelroad plays traditional Russian music in an original post-folk style in concert halls and festivals throughout Europe and Russia.

In 2008 the band crossed the Atlantic to perform at world music festivals in Mexico and the United States. In early 2009 Reelroad celebrated its 10th anniversary.

Reelroad’s repertoire favors obscure folk songs from northern Russia and central Siberia, music driven underground for decades. Reelroad has two styles of performing Russian folk music. The first echoes the village with the sound of Russian instruments such as the gusli (zither), zhaleika (fife) and kaljuka.

Traditional vocals are prominent, due in part to Reelroad members Anastasia Karaseva and Aleksandrs Dmitrijevs, founders of the traditional village choir “Dubinushka.” Acoustic guitar, violin, flute and bagpipes round out the sound.

In the second style, developed for the large stage, Reelroad projects and amplifies the village sound with bass guitar and drums. All seven Reelroad members are musicians. Four serve as vocalists as well, singing in traditional Russian village vocal style.

Anastasia Karaseva plays the tin whistle, Spanish pandereta and Irish harp.

Alexey Belkin manages Reelroad and plays Galician and Scottish bagpipes, zhaleika (fife) and winged gusli (dulcimer).

Aleksandrs “Kep” Dmitrijevs plays acoustic guitar, banjo and harmonica.

Natalia Vysokikh is a professional violinist.

Alexey Skosyrev made the fretless bass guitar he plays, as well as Anastasia’s harp.

Svetlana Kondesyuk, a graduate of the Academy of Arts, plays the flute and Galician bagpipes.

Denis Nikiforov learned to play the drums in the army, studied at the Academy of Arts, and works at the famous Hermitage museum.

In addition to concert performances, Reelroad teaches Russian folk dances in clubs and dance schools. The band welcomes dancers of all skill levels and aims to dispel the belief Russian folk dances are boring or difficult.

Discography

Reelroad (2001)
Стрела – Arrow (2003)
Гуляю, гуляю – I Walk I Walk (2007)
Выйду за ворота – Past the gates (2014)
На море орёл (single) (2016)

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Andrey Vinogradov to perform at Hyperion

Russian composer and arranger Andrey Vinogradov (a former member of the legendary Russian band Arsenal) is set to play on hurdy-gurdy March 30th, 2017 at Hyperion club, Moscow.

You will hear Andrey’s own songs and instrumental compositions, as well as Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian, Greek, Austrian music, contemporary classical melodies, and jazz improvisation on hurdy-gurdy. This exact instrument was made by Wolfgang Weichselbaumer from Austria.

Andrey participated at several prestigious folk festivals recently like Krutushka (Kazan, 2015), EuroFolk (Bulgaria, 2015), Medunarodni Festival Tradicijskih Glazbala (Croatia, 2015), Manor Jazz Rosa Khutor (Russia, 2016), Music on the river (Russia, 2016), and Pilsen Busking Fest (Czech Republic, 2016).

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Interview with Russian Folk Singer Alyona Minulina

For about 4 years Alyona Minulina has been known as Alyona FolkBeat – a beautiful folk singer and beatbox musician from a rising star group FolkBeat. In February 2017 Russian label FireStorm production released their new album “I’m marching on my own” that was recorded and produced by Alyona but at the same time their fans were shocked by news about her leaving the project. Alyona tells us what happened and what’s next.

Q:How did the group FolkBeat get started?

Alyona Minulina: FolkBeat grew up from a student’s ensemble. It was called differently and consisted of a large number of participants. Later I began to study beatbox and electronic music, so I thought it was interesting to combine it with Russian folk songs. So FolkBeat has traditional Slavic polyphony, surrounded by electronic arrangement, which is close to the styles of EDM trap, dubstep, trance and crunk. The compositions are often performed with beatbox – imitation of drum machines and music effects using vocal apparatus and articulation organs.

 

Alyona Minulina

 

Q: How would you describe your musical journey so far?

AM: When we started we made music for ourselves and gradually our music started to be interesting to other people. We didn’t think about genres, we were passionate about making music with each other, it was really awesome. When we went on stage the audience felt our special energy.

Q: Did you perform in Europe or only in Russia?

AM: In 2016 Folkbeat took part at EuroRadio Festival and had a concert in Viljandi (Estonia). Besides this we visited Madrid, Munich, Athens and Tallinn with festival of Russian cultural FeelRussia.

Q: As I know – you love collaborating with different music genres and bands: what are the features of Russian folk music that makes it possible for you to collaborate with other musicians?

AM: The most interesting thing for me is the fact that people connect with each other, share cultures, and different genres and traditions mix too. Now I have plans to record some songs together with the master of throat singing Alexei Chichakov from Mountain Altai. This will be the connection of his own Altai traditions and Slavic melodies.

In every collaboration I’m looking for special feeling when the spark runs between musicians (chemistry in our relationship), because then, every performance becomes memorable for listeners. This is the highlight for me. Of course with Folkbeat we often had this feeling. When the head is full with ideas – I always find the way to realize them. But sometimes I get tired and I need to allow some rest for myself. This is the most difficult thing for me.

 

 

Q: What music instruments do you use?

AM: Different electronic things (loop station, keyboards), sometimes folk wind instruments like kugikly and kaliuk, khomus.

 

Alyona Minulina

 

Q: What can you tell us about the contemporary Russian folk scene?

AM: Despite the fact that the Russian folk scene is a real “folk star” and a budding young musicians, it hasn’t been formed yet. We do not have enough support and solidarity between each other. Although we have more opportunities for advancement than 10 years ago.

Q: How are your albums being received by audiences?

AM: Our first album «Joyful meeting» became favorite Russian-folk album on EBU Folk Festival in 2016. In Russia it was in the top twenty music albums of 2016. This year we released the album «Sama idu» (I’m marching on my own). We collaborated with different electronic musicians and DJs, so it can be classified as pop-folk.

Q: Who would you say are the leading influences in your musical career?

AM: My teachers, who always said something like this: pull yourself and work, work hard, if you really love it.

Q: So what happened to FolkBeat?

AM: With Folkbeat we are friends, but we do not work together anymore. If the world gives us a chance to sing together again, I will take this chance.

Now I work on original songs album with the texts of famous Russian poets from XX century. And together with Jewish, Armenian, Russian musicians and composer from Canada, Ivan Popov, we have created a world music project “Under The Same Sky” which intertwined tunes and melodies of different national cultures. In March we will have a concert of Slavic-Jewish music.

 

Alyona Minulina

 

Q: Are Russian audiences, venues, labels and artists open to collaboration?

AM: It depends on various factors, but if you play interesting music, you can always find a way.

Q: Where do you see yourself 10 or 15 years from today?

AM: I see myself chewing pasta in my favorite little pizzeria in Italy, resting in a cozy wooden house on the Solovetsky Islands in Russia, and playing my set at the Burning Man.

Q: Do you also teach workshops for students and musicians?

 

Alyona Minulina

 

AM: I opened vocal beatbox and body percussion workshops named “Pulse” in Moscow recently and it’s getting popular. I have a lot of new ideas and projects in my head and I hope my music experience with FolkBeat will help me to create something really unique and internationally interesting.

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