Tag Archives: Malian music

Vieux Farka Toure Delivers a Masterful Collection of Desert Blues, Funk, Reggae, and Rock

Vieux Farka Toure – Samba (Six Degrees Records, 2017)

Too often when we hear “it must be something in the blood” it conjures up images of someone gone wrong somewhere, but nothing could be further from that kind of assumption when we’re talking about Mali’s Vieux Farka Toure.

Son of the musical powerhouse Ali Farka Toure, Vieux Farka Toure has not just continued in his father’s musical footsteps but blazed a path of his own with recordings like Vieux Farka Toure, Fondo, The Secret, Mon Pays and Touristes with Julia Easterlin and an ongoing collaboration with Israeli musician Idan Raichel on the Toure-Raichel Collective. And the righteous riffs just keep coming with the Six Degrees Records release of his latest of Samba.

Mr. Toure is just content to rest on his vocals and guitar playing laurels on Samba; instead he composed and arranged all the tracks and produced this latest with co-producer Eric Herman. Mr. Toure explains the recording process of Samba, “It was not a regular studio session nor was it a concert. It was somewhere in between. We were recording the album, but we had an audience of about fifty people in the room with us. The audience understood it was to witness the process of recording an album, not to present a concert in a studio, which was a very good thing because we got the energy of a live concert with the quality of a studio recording.”

Rich, warm and rewarding, Samba pulls at the threads of desert blues, funk, reggae, rock and Malian praise song to create a polished, masterful collection of tracks. From the opening of the guitar lick laced “Bonheur” through to the deliciously catchy “Ni Negaba,” Mr. Toure lets his listeners ride a wave of hypnotic grooves while using his musical voice to express the joys of family, the importance of protecting the environment and the pitfalls of religious fanaticism in the wake of Mali’s recent struggles with jihadism where music was banned and musicians were abused or exiled.

Backed by such musicians as drummer Mamadou Kone, calabash player Soulemane Kane, ngoni players Maffa Diabate and Abdoulaye Kone, bassists Marshall Henry, Eric Herman and Checikmare Ba, shaker and kourignans player Tim Keiper and organist and keyboardist Rob Cohen, Mr. Toure gives listeners a delicious ride on sizzling tracks like “Ba Kaitere” and “Homafu Wawa,” and doles out delectable treats like the guitar and ngoni enfused “Samba Si Kairi” and the cool grooves of “Nature.” Fans get a dose of guest keyboardist Idan Raichel on the track “Mariam,” a track dedicated to Mr. Toure’s little sister, and the delightfully elegant track “Maya.”

 

 

Despite some doubts about the success of Samba, Mr. Toure says of the experience, “It was an interesting idea but I did not know how it would go. Luckily everything was perfect. There was a great ambience there for the session and we were able to capture this unique energy for the album.

Mr. Toure has certainly blazed his own path on Mali’s musical griot road of riches with Samba. Must be something in the blood.

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Mamadou Kelly Meets Cindy Cashdollar

Mamadou Kelly – Politiki (Clermont Music CLE 016CD, 2017)

Superb Malian guitarist Mamadou Kelly skillfully combines Saharan desert blues with American blues on Politiki.

In addition to his regular band, BanKaiNa, Mamadou Kelly invited American musicians such as award-winning steel guitar master Cindy Cashdollar, Susie Ibarra on drums, Jake Silver on bass, and Dan Littleton on guitars.

Politiki is a remarkable combination of West African and American blues genres featuring outstanding guitar work.

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Vieux Farka Toure to Perform at Villa Victoria Center for the Arts

Vieux Farka Toure

Malian guitar maestro Vieux Farka Toure is set to perform on Friday, April 7, 8:00 pm at the Villa Victoria Center for the Arts in Boston. He will be presenting his new album titled Samba.

Vieux Farka Touré performs Malian blues in the rich Songhai tradition of his late father, celebrated guitarist Ali Farka Touré.

Villa Victoria Center for the Arts
85 W. Newton St., Boston, MA 02118
$28 General Admission, 18+
Tickets: https://tickets.worldmusic.org/TheatreManager/1/online?performance=1692

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Malian Guitar Virtuoso Vieux Farka Touré Announces 2017 North American Samba Tour

Vieux Farka Touré

Acclaimed Malian guitarist Vieux Farka Touré will be touring the United States April-May 2017. The tour begins at Brooklyn New York’s BRIC House on Thursday, April 6th, coinciding with the official release of Samba (Six Degrees Records), Vieux Farka Touré’s new album.

Samba was recorded as part of the Woodstock Sessions, a series that combines live performance and studio recording with their ground-breaking venue.

While Touré was recording the album, he had an audience of about fifty people in the room. Touré received the vigor of a live concert with the quality of a studio recording. Touré was very satisfied with the experience, “we were able to capture this unique energy for the album.”

Vieux Farka Touré Spring 2017 Tour Dates:

4/6: BRIC House, Brooklyn, NY
4/7: Villa Victoria, Boston, MA
4/8: The Outdoor Space, Hamden, CT
4/10: World Cafe Live, Philadelphia, PA
4/11: Club Cafe, Pittsburgh, PA
4/12: Creative Alliance, Baltimore, MA
4/13: The Mothlight, Asheville, NC
4/14: King’s, Raleigh, NC
4/15: Charleston Pour House, Charleston, SC
4/18: Proud Larry’s Oxford, MI
4/19: Terminal West, Atlanta, CA
4/22: Transatlantic, Miami Beach, FL
4/24: Casbah, San Diego, CA
4/25: Echoplex, Los Angeles, CA
4/26: Yoshi’s, Oakland, CA
4/28: Kuumbwa Jazz Center, Santa Cruz, CA
4/29: Grass Valley Center for the Arts, Grass Valley, CA
4/30: Ner Shalom, Cotati, CA
5/03: Nectar Seattle, WA
5/04: Star Theater, Portland, OR
5/05: Wild Buffalo, Bellingham, WA
5/07: Neurolux, Boise, ID
5/09: State Room, Salt Lake City, IA

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Artist Profiles: Kassé Mady Diabaté

Kassé Mady Diabaté

Kassé Mady Diabaté has one of West Africa’s greatest voices and he’s one of the most cherished singers in Mali. He is known for his profound knowledge of Mali’s deepest oral and musical traditions and the beauty of his tenor voice.

He was born in 1949 in Kela, a renowned center of the Mande jeli tradition in western Mali, near Kangaba, one of the seats of the great Mali empire (1235-1469). 

Kasse Mady’s family, the Diabates of Kela -all of whom are jelis- were the singers for the emperors and their descendants, the royal Keita lineage.  And still today they are considered among the most important and authoritative jeli families across seven West African countries where Mande culture predominates.

Kasse Mady is the second person ever to be given the name Kasse Mady, which means ‘Weep Mady’  (Mady is a regional variant of Mohammed).  His grandfather, also from Kela, was the first.

Mady, the grandfather, had such a beautiful voice that when he sang, he would move people to tears, therefore his nickname, ‘Kasse from Kassi,’ (to weep).  Kasse Mady the younger was given this name at birth to honor the grandfather.  But no one in the family could imagine that his voice would have the same power and ability to move people to extreme states of emotion.

While still a young boy, Kasse Mady began singing at local weddings and other ceremonies, and around 1970 he was invited to become the lead singer of the dance orchestra of the nearby town of Kangaba.  This orchestra was called the Super Mande, a name his brother Lafia Diabate, also a well-known singer, now uses for his own band of Kela musicians who are based in Bamako and who are the principal musicians on the album Kassi Kasse.

The decade of 1970s was an important period in Mali because of the new Cultural Authenticity policies that was in place in the newly independent nation states of West Africa.  In Mali, as elsewhere, musicians were encouraged to return to their own folklore instead of imitating rock or Cuban music.  As it happened, Kasse Mady’s special blend of traditional Mande folklore with modern instruments was to play an important role in this movement.

Every two years, the Malian government sponsored a major festival call the Biennale, in which all the regional ensembles and dance orchestras competed with each other.  In 1973, it was the Super Mande from Kangaba who won, thanks to the remarkable singing of Kasse Mady.

Not long before that, a group of eight musicians who had been studying music in Cuba had returned to Mali and formed the group Las Maravillas de Mali, famous for their charanga interpretations of Cuban classics.  But according to the dictates of Cultural Authenticity, they had to begin to take on more of a Malian repertoire.  After hearing Kasse Mady perform at the Biennale, they decided that he was the one to do this.

The musical director was sent down to Kela, 104 kms west of Bamako down a bumpy dirt road, to find the singer.  After various ritual consultations with the family, who were (and still are) very protective of their traditions, Kasse Mady was allowed to go to join the band in Bamako. Soon after, the Maravillas began enjoying a tremendous success throughout West Africa with songs like ‘Balomina Mwanga’ and ‘Maimouna,’ all sung memorably by the young Kasse Mady in Cuban style, but with a new Mande touch. 

Around 1976 the band renamed themselves National Badema du Mali (meaning national family of Mali). Kasse Mady launched this new lineup with several deep Mande songs that were to become hits, such as ‘Sindiya (later re-recorded by Ali Farka Toure as ‘Singya’ on his first World Circuit album) and ‘Fode’ that was also the title of Kasse’s first solo album in 1988.  Other hits were ‘Nama,’ a song Kasse Mady composed about a true story of a canoe that overturned while crossing the river Niger on September 22 in which many people drowned and ‘Guede’ that he later re-recorded with american bluesman Taj Mahal.
  
By the mid 1980s, there was no longer much interest among Malian audiences in the old dance bands of the 1970s.  The Rail Band was playing to ever decreasing audiences, and the Ambassadeurs, formerly led by singer Salif Keita, had disbanded.

So when Kasse Mady was invited to Paris to record his first solo album for Senegalese producer Ibrahima Sylla (of Africando fame), Kasse decided to try his luck. He left the national Badema and moved to Paris, where he spent the next ten years. During this period he recorded two solo albums, Fode, an electric dance album that was meant to be the answer to Salif Keita’s Soro but did not enjoy the same promotion; and Kela Tradition, an acoustic album of Kela jeli songs, both on the Paris label Syllart. 

Also in this period, Kasse Mady collaborated in the album Songhai 2 with Spanish flamenco group Ketama and Malian kora player Toumani Diabate, with some stunning versions of classics such as ‘Mali Sajio,’ as well as, the beautiful ballad ‘Pozo del Deseo’ sung together with Ketama singer Antonio Carmona.

But things did not turn out as planned in Paris. Kasse Mady’s non-confrontational and peaceful character did not help him find his way through the labyrinth of royalty payments and contracts and the hard-nosed music business of Paris. 

Exploited and disappointed, he returned to Bamako in 1998 where things began to look up for him.  The music scene in Bamako had picked up considerably since he had left ten years before. For a start, there was now a new democratic government and a renewed interest among the youth in traditional music. 

The kora player Toumani Diabate immediately recruirted Kasse Mady for more collaboration after the successful work they had done together on Songhai 2.  Kasse Mady was invited to take part in the acclaimed Kulanjan project with Taj Mahal.  Taj was so moved by Kasse’s singing that he presented him with a beautiful steel-body guitar and now, having heard the new album Kassi Kasse, is so entranced by it that he takes it with him everywhere he goes on his extensive concert tours.

in 2010, Kasse Mady partricipated in the landmark Afrocubism project, a spectacular collaboration of musicians from Mali and Cuba. the lineup featured Eliades Ochoa, Bassekou Kouyate, Djelimady Tounkara, Toumani Diabaté, Grupo Patria, Kasse Mady Diabaté and Lassana Diabaté.

Discography

* Fode (Syllart)
* Kela Tradition (Syllart)
* Songhai 2 (Hannibal, 1994)
* Kulanjan (Hannibal, 1999)
* Kassi Kasse (Narada, 2003)
* Manden Djeli Kan (Wrasse Records, 2009)
* Afrocubism (World Circuit, 2010)
* Kiriké – Horse’s saddle (No Format!, 2014)

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Malian Music Stars BKO Quintet to perform in UK

BKO Quintet
BKO Quintet

Malian music sensation BKO Quintet is set to perform in Manchester and Liverpool this month as part of a 7-date UK tour. The band will be promoting its debut album Bamako Today.

BKO Quintet – UK Tour Dates 2016

27th November
Hootananny, London
free admission

28th November
Sound Control, Manchester
Tickets

29th November
The Parish, Huddersfield
Tickets

30th November
Student Workshop, Liverpool
sold out

1st December
24 Kitchen Street, Liverpool
Tickets

2nd December
The Canteen, Bristol
free admission

3rd December
Duke of Cumberland, Whitstable
Tickets: 01227 280617

4th December
Arts Centre, Norwich
Tickets

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Tinariwen Release Advance of ‘Sastanàqqàm’, the first single from forthcoming new album Elwan

Tinariwen - Photo by Thomas Dorn
Tinariwen – Photo by Thomas Dorn

Malian desert blues band Tinariwen has released a video advance of ‘Sastanàqqàm,’ the first single from the band’s upcoming new album, Elwan, scheduled for release released on February 10th 2017 on Wedge.

In 2014, Tinariwen stopped at Rancho de la Luna studios in the desert of California’s Joshua Tree National Park. Guitarist Matt Sweeny, singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Kurt Vile, musician and vocalist Alan Johannes recorded sessions with the Malian band, engineered by Andrew Schepps, who has worked with the Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Johnny Cash, and Jay Z.

Two years later in M’Hamid El Ghizlane, an oasis in southern Morocco, near the Algerian frontier, Tinariwen set up their tents to record, accompanied by the local musical youth and a Ganga ensemble of Gnawa musicians.

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Malian World Music Innovator Issa Bagayogo Dies at 55

Mali’s musical landscape is a fair bit dimmer with the death of Issa Bagayogo. The singer and musician passed away after a long illness on October 10, 2016. Mr. Bagayogo was 55.

Born in to a poor family in the small village of Korin in a section of the Bougouni Cercle, a part of the Sikasso region of Mali, Mr. Bagayogo found his way to music as a young boy by way of the daro, an iron bell struck to set the rhythm of field workers in Mali, before picking up and learning to play the kamele n’goni, a six-stringed instrument similar to an oud or guitar found in West Africa. He garnered local attention with his playing and singing local songs before heading off to Bamako in 1991 to record his first cassette that didn’t seem to catch on with music fans. Soon, another cassette followed in 1993, again without much success.

Dispirited and working as a bus driver, Mr. Bagayogo sunk into depression and addiction, losing his wife and the bus driving job as a result. This low point would take him back to his home village and essentially disappear from the music scene. By the late 1990s, Mr. Bagayogo would finally put his life back on track by quitting the drugs, travel back to Bamako and fashion his own sound out of the musical traditions of his home region with those of rock, funk, electronica and dub styles.

 

Issa Bagayogo
Issa Bagayogo

 

Earning the nickname “Techno Issa” by way of his mix of Mali’s musical roots and western dance, Mr. Bagayogo earned a name not only through his singing and playing, but also by way of his music that tacked such issues as cultural pride, drug use, AIDS and other social issues. Throughout his career, Mr. Bagayogo worked with keyboardist and producer Yves Wernert and bandmates and guitarists Karamoukou Diabate and Mama Sissoko. Mr. Bagayogo would go on to record Sya, Timbuktu, Tassoumakan and Mali Koura, all on the Six Degrees Records label.

In a statement, Six Degrees Records said, “All of us at Six Degrees Records are greatly saddened to learn that our friend and artist, Issa Bagayogo has passed away after a lengthy illness. He was a kind and gentle soul, whose music touched many people around the world & moved many a dance-floor.”

Mr. Bagayogo will be returned to his home village in Korin Bougouni for burial.

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Trio Da Kali Announces US Tour

Trio Da Kali
Trio Da Kali

Contemporary Mandé griot act Trio Da Kali has announced its upcoming American tour. Trio Da Kali features Hawa Kassé Mady Diabaté on vocals, Lassana Diabaté (of AfroCubism) on the bala and Mamadou Kouyaté (son of Bassekou Kouyaté) on the bass ngoni. The Trio recently performed in Spain at WOMEX 2016.

Trio Da Kali has been in the studio recording a new album with Kronos Quartet.

02.11.2016 – ArtsLIVE – University of Dayton, OH (USA)
04.11.2016 – Zellerbach Auditorium – University of California, Berkeley CA (USA)
06.11.2016 – Center for the Arts – Grass Valley, CA (USA)
09.11.2016 – Sanctuary for Independent Media – Troy NY (USA)
11.11.2016 – Goddard College – Plainfield VT (US)
12.11.2016 – Carnegie Hall-Zankel – New York NY (USA) with Derek Gripper
13.11.2016 – Calvary Center – Crossroads Music, Philadelphia, PA (USA)

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Rokia Traoré to Perform at Symphony Space

Rokia Traoré
Rokia Traoré

 

Acclaimed Malian singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Rokia Traoré is set to perform on Sunday, October 30, 2016 at Symphony Space in New York City.

Rokia Traoré mixes the sounds of Mali with desert blues, folk, and other musical traditions. On her 2016 album, Né So, Rokia invited John Parish (PJ Harvey, Eels), John Paul Jones (Led Zeppelin), and Devendra Banhart to help her communicate her deep sorrow at the state of chaos in her native Mali.

 

Rokia Traoré - "Né So" (Nonesuch Records, 2016)
Rokia Traoré – “Né So” (Nonesuch Records, 2016)

 

Rokia continues the strong modern legacy of female singer-songwriters from Mali such as Oumou Sangare and Fatomatou Diawara, and takes the desert blues and folk traditions of her homeland to new realms,” says World Music Institute artistic director Par Neiburger, “Rokia’s style is distinct, and her vocals and musicianship make her a singular artist who appeals to even those not familiar with or previously exposed to African music.”

 

 

Sunday, October 30, 2016, 8:00 p.m.
Symphony Space
2537 Broadway
Tickets: $35 / $45 / $55
www.worldmusicinstitute.org

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