Tag Archives: Latin jazz

Superb Latin Jazz Guitar Discoveries

Steve Khan – Backlog – Asuntos Pendientes (Tone Center, 2017)

Guitar maestro Steve Khan continues his remarkable series of Latin jazz explorations with Backlog. Khan skillfully combines soloing with rhythm guitar techniques as well as subtle slide effects. He’s supported by an outstanding rhythm section featuring three percussionists and a bass player.

The rich, irresistible percussion section adds an undeniable Afro-Cuban flavor to the music, even when Khan performs jazz standards by Thelonious Monk and Ornette Coleman, a tribute to the late Bobby Hutcherson, or even Stevie Wonder’s hit song “Go Home.”

There is no smooth jazz here. Steve Khan delivers real contemporary jazz infused with beats from the Spanish-speaking region of the Caribbean.

The lineup on Backlog includes Steve Khan on guitar, Rubén Rodríguez on baby bass and electric bass; Bobby Allende on conga and bongo; Marc Quiñones on timbales, bongo and percussion; Mark Walker on drums.

Guest featured Rob Mounsey on keyboards and orchestrations; Randy Brecker on trumpet; Mike Mainieri on vibraphones vibraphone; Bob Mintzer on tenor saxophone; and Tatiana Parra on vocals.

On Backlog – Asuntos Pendientes Steve Khan delivers a set of masterful performances opening new pathways for the electric guitar in the context of Latin jazz.

Buy Backlog – Asuntos Pendientes

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Latin Jazz Flute Virtuoso Dave Valentin Dies at 64

Dave Valentin

Puerto-Rican American Latin jazz flutist Dave Valentin passed away today, March 8, 2017 in New York City.

Valentin was born in The Bronx neighborhood in New York City to Puerto-Rican parents. At 12 he started playing the flute and received music lessons from Hubert Laws.

Throughout the 1970s, Valentin played jazz and Latin jazz in various well-known bands. He also released numerous solo albums for the GRP and Highnote labels.

Dave Valentin was a dedicated flutist and innovator of crossover jazz. Under the mentorship of Hubert Laws, the New York native developed a signature sound by combining the influences of R&B, pop, and Brazilian music to create a specialized form of Latin jazz,” said Neil Portnow, President/CEO of The Recording Academy. “After his recording debut with Ricardo Marrero’s group, he went on to collaborate and perform with Tito Puente, Horacio “El Negro” Hernandez, Bill O’Connell, and Dave Samuels, among others. In 2002 he teamed with Samuels for the Caribbean Jazz Project album The Gathering, which won a GRAMMY® for Best Latin Jazz Album. His 2005 album World On A String and 2011 album Pure Imagination each received Latin GRAMMY nominations for Best Latin Jazz Album. Our thoughts go out to Dave’s family, friends, and fellow colleagues.”

In March of 2012 Valentin suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed and unable to perform.

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The First Day of Spring in Krakow

Arturo Sandoval in Krakow 2017 – Photo by Paulina Tendera

The Krakow appearance of the Arturo Sandoval Sextet at Centrum Kijów kicked off spring, which, thanks to Letni Festiwal Jazzowy Piwnicy pod Baranami (http://www.cracjazz.com/pl/) [Cellar under the Rams Summer Jazz Festival], arrived unusually early this year. Cuban and afro rhythms warmed us and infected us with dance fever throughout the two-hour performance.

Arturo Sandoval had such a great time onstage with music and rhythm that it would have been a shame for us to enjoy ourselves any less.

The performance also featured several jazz ballads, performed solo by Sandoval, on the piano; reminiscences of Dizzy Gillespie, a great friend and mentor of Sandoval’s who died in 1993.; a short but comical and substantial lecture, “What is bebop?”; and Sandoval’s excellent sense of humor. Thus no element of jazz was lacking.

Arturo Sandoval Sextet in Krakow 2017 – Photo by Paulina Tendera

Sandoval also returned to his classic repertoire, from which he had departed on Eternamente Manzanero, his latest album, recorded with Jorge Calandrelli, which was dominated by romantic ballads and even pop sounds.

Anyone wishing to be reminded of the mood of the Krakow concert would be well advised to dig To a Finland Station (1982) out of his or her vinyl collection.

In Krakow starring:

John Belzaguy – bass
Tiki Pasillas – percussion
Dave Siegel – keyboard
Johny Friday – drums
Kemuel Roig – piano

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Chucho Valdés Wins Best Latin Jazz Album Grammy Award

Tribute To Irakere: Live In Marciac (Jazz Village) by Chucho Valdés is the winner of the Best Latin Jazz Album at the 59th Annual Grammy Awards.

The other finalists were:

Entre Colegas – Andy González (Truth Revolution Records)
Madera Latino: A Latin Jazz Perspective On The Music Of Woody Shaw – Brian Lynch & Various Artists (Hollistic Musicworks)
Canto América – Michael Spiro/Wayne Wallace La Orquesta Sinfonietta (Patois Records)
30 – Trio Da Paz (Zoho)

Purchase Tribute To Irakere: Live In Marciac

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Artist Profiles: Ignacio Nachito Herrera

Ignacio Nachito Herrera

Recognized as a young genius, Ignacio “Nachito” Herrera stunned Cuban audiences at the age of 12, performing Rachmaninoff’s Concerto No. 2 with the Havana Symphony Orchestra. Famed Cuban pianist and Buena Vista Social Club member, Ruben Gonzalez invited the 16-year-old Nachito to join him on stage and inspired the teenager to study the traditional rhythms of Cuba. Herrera’s classical grounding, natural abilities, and enthusiasm for his subject paid off. In addition, Herrera has studied with Cuban masters; Chucho Valdes, Ruben Gonzalez & Frank Fernandez.

Following his 1990 Masters Degree in Music from Superior Institute of Art, Havana, Cuba, Nachito Herrera began performing, directing and touring with state-sponsored orchestras and the renowned Tropicana Orchestra. In 1997, he joined Cubanismo, with whom he recorded two albums, eventually becoming the musical director.

Nachito toured Europe, the United States and the Far East with the group and while recording Mardi Gras Mambo in New Orleans, Herrera amazed the Crescent City with his local performances and was named an Honorary Citizen of New Orleans. In 1996, Herrera recorded Ula-Ula, with the renowned Cuban group, Bakuleye, of which he was musical director, producer and composer in addition to winning the Cuban Nobel Prize of the Year for Best Orchestra.

Upon leaving Cubanismo in 2001, Nachito settled in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis/St. Paul) of Minnesota, where he gained a following amongst fans of both jazz and Latin music. Now, Herrera’s own band, Puro Cubano includes saxophonist Rodolfo Gomez, bassist Jorge Bringas, veteran percussionist Shai Hayo and master drummer, Gordy Knudtson. Collectively, their credits include working, touring and recording with; Salsa Blanca and the Latin Sounds Orchestra, Celia Cruz, Albita, the Steve Miller Band, Ben Sidran and the renowned Puerto Rican Folklorico group, Proyecto La Plena.

Nachito Herrera’s affection for all types of music is apparent and he often cites the correlations between African rhythms, Cuban guajiras, American jazz, and classical composers. “I love all kinds of music, especially American music, but I love Cuban music the most….I like to combine the older Cuban styles, especially the rhythmic approaches of montunos and tumbaos, with jazz and classical themes. It’s how I see the evolution of Cuban piano,” says Herrera.

Discography

* Live at the Dakota (Dakota Live, 2002)

* Bembé en mi casa (FS Music, 2005)

* Live at the Dakota, Vol. 2 (Dakota Live, 2006)

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Sizzling Jambú

Jungle Fire – Jambú (Jungle Fire Music/Nacional Records, 2016)

Los Angeles-based Afro-Latin funk band Jungle Fire is an outstanding collective of musicians from various backgrounds who have played with many well-known artists and musical styles. On their album Jambú, Jungle Fire delivers a sizzling genre-defying combination of Afrobeat, funk, cumbia, Latin jazz, West Coast Latin rock, makossa, and more, featuring an irresistible rhythm section and potent brass section.

The line-up includes Joseph “Joey” Reina on bass; Jud McDaniel on guitar and bass; Patrick Bailey on guitars; bass and Korg MS-20; Sam Halterman on drums; Sam Robles on baritone saxophone; Otto Granillo on trombone; Sean Billings on trumpet; Alberto López on congas, timbales, batá drums, cajón, güiro, flor tom, guacho, guagua, llamador, Moroccan bongo, guijada, qraqeb (karkabas); claps and vocals; Michael Duffy on timbales, bongos, bongó cowbell and claps; Steve Haney on congas, bongó, batá, shekere, güiro, trash lid and tambourine. Special guests: Sandino González-Flores on vocals and Natalia González on vocals.

 

 

 

 

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Artist Profiles: Giovanni Hidalgo

Giovanni Hidalgo

 

Widely acknowledged among the greatest congueros of his generation, Giovanni Hidalgo was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1963, first taking up the drums five years later

The son of the noted percussionist Jose “Manengue” Hidalgo, he was educated in Latin rhythms from childhood onward, and as a teen regularly walked to local gigs with his congas strapped to his back. He soon caught the attention of the legendary Dizzy Gillespie, touring in his United Nations All-Star Orchestra for four years.

Hidalgo also became a noted session player, recording with Freddie Hubbard, Paul Simon and Mickey Hart’s Planet Drum project. In 1992, he recorded his debut solo LP, Villa Hidalgo; Worldwide followed a year later.

1997’s Hands of Rhythm collaboration with pianist Michel Camilo, earned Hidalgo a Grammy nomination in the Best Latin Jazz Album category.

His Greatest Hits collection followed the next year.

 

Giovanni Hidalgo

 

Berklee College of Music presented an honorary doctor of music degree to Giovanni Hidalgo in 2010. Hidalgo taught in Berklee’s percussion department from 1992-1996.

 

 

Partial Discography

* Villa Hidalgo (Messidor, 1992)
* Worldwide (RMM Records, 1993)
* Time Shifter (RMM Records, 1995)
* Hands of Rhythm, with Michel Camilo (RMM Records, 1997)
* The Best of Giovanni Hidalgo (RMM records, 1998)
* Conga Kings, with the Conga Kings (Chesky Records, 2000)
* Jazz Descargas, with the Conga Kings (Chesky Records, 2001)
* Silver Gold (Incipit, 2009)
* Mano a Mano, with Michel Camilo (Emarcy, 2011)
* Mysterium Tremendum, with Mickey Hart Band (360° Productions, 2012)

Videos

* Conga Masters: Changuito and Giovanni Duets (Alfred Publishing, 1995)
* Conga Virtuoso: Giovanni Hidalgo (Warner Brothers Classics, 2005)

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Artist Profiles: Bobby Sanabria

Bobby Sanabria

Bobby Sanabria is a drummer, percussionist, composer, arranger, recording artist, and educator who has performed with many of the leading figures in the world of Jazz and Latin music. Sanabria has performed and recorded with such legends as Dizzy Gillespie, Tito Puente, Mongo Santamaría, Paquito D’Rivera, Ray Barretto, Candido, Arturo Sandoval, Henry Threadgill, Larry Harlow, and the Godfather of Afro-Cuban jazz, Mario Bauzá, as well as with his own critically acclaimed ensemble, Ascension.

Sanabria, the son of Puerto Rican parents, was born and raised in New York City’s South Bronx. Inspired and encouraged by maestro Tito Puente, another fellow New York-born Puerto Rican, Bobby “got serious” and attended Boston’s Berklee College of Music from 1975 to 1979, obtaining a bachelor of music degree. He received their prestigious Faculty Association Award for his work as an instrumentalist. Since his graduation, Bobby has become a leader in the Afro-Cuban and Jazz fields as both drummer and percussionist and is recognized as one of the most articulate scholars of ‘la tradicion’. His most critically praised work has been with the famed Mario Bauzá and his Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra, with whom he has recorded three CDs, considered to be the definitive works of the Afro-Cuban big-band Jazz tradition.

Sanabria has been the recipient of many awards, including an NEA (National Endowment for the Arts) grant as a jazz performer, various Meet the Composer awards, and the INTAR off-Broadway composer award.

Sanabria’s first big band recording, Live & in Clave!!! was nominated for a mainstream Grammy in 2001. In 2003 he was nominated for a Latin Grammy for, “50 Years of Mambo”, A Tribute to Damaso Perez Prado. Drum! Magazine named him Percussionist of the Year in 2005.

His 2008 recording is “El Espiritu Jibaro – The Jibaro Spirit” with trombonist Roswell Rudd and cuatro virtuoso Yomo Toro, which features Bobby with his nonet, Ascensión.

Sanabria is the associate producer of the TV documentaries “The Palladium: Where Mambo Was King” shown on Bravo which was winner of the IMAGINE award for best documentary of 2003 and “From Mambo to Hip Hop”, another award winning documentary (ALMA award, best documentary for TV) shown on PBS in 2007. He is the author of the acclaimed video series, Getting Started on Congas and he is a featured performer on the DVD, Modern Drummer Festival 2006, from Hudson Music. Bobby continues his important work in spreading the Gospel of Latin jazz by being a consultant and featured on screen interviewee for PBS’s landmark 4-hour documentary, LATIN MUSIC U.S.A. premiering nationwide on PBS October 12, 2009.

In August of 2012, Sanabria released Multiverse, inspired by the writings of Mexican author Octavio Paz and the current scientific theories of multiple universes.

Discography

¡NYC Aché!, with Ascensión (Flying Fish Records/Rounder, 1993)

Afro-Cuban Dream… Live & In Clave!!! (Arabesque label, 2000).

¡Quarteto Aché! (Zoho, 2002)

50 Years of Mambo – A Tribute to Damaso Perez Prado (Mambo Maniacs, 2003)

Big Band Urban Folktales (Jazzheads, 2007)

El Espiritu Jibaro – The Jibaro Spirit(2008)

Kenya Revisited Live!!! (Jazzheads, 2009)

Tito Puente Masterworks Live!!! (Jazzheads, 2011)

Multiverse (Jazzheads, 2012)

Que Viva Harlem! (Jazzheads, 2014)

Videos

Getting Started on Congas (Warner Brothers, 2000)

Official web site: http://www.bobbysanabria.com

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Les Moncada Chats with “Timbalero Monster” Nicky Marrero

There are timbaleros (timbales players) in Latin music and then there are timbaleros. Nicky Marrero is the master at his work! Nicky Marrero has performed on hundreds of recordings, especially for Fania Records in New York City. Nicky Marrero is “El Monstruo del Timbal”, the Monster of the Timbales.

Nicky, has the ability of getting many tones out his drumheads, playing with preciseness and action. Nicky Marrero is always exciting on stage and bringing light to the show. You know that when he plays, it is Nicky Marrero up there on stage soloing, A-1 plus, like a Monster Timbalero should.

With years of playing, practice and patience with the drums, whether it is timbales or congas, Nicky Marrero brings a solo swing to the orchestra, to compliment the musicians and the coro (chorus) in the orchestra. This is what Nicky Marrero does on stage if you observe him.

 

 

Nicky is always getting better, as he ages, like a fine wine!

Nicky has performed with all the legends; too many to name, also a member of the legendary Fania All Stars and is a very humble musician.

Let’s hear what Nicky has to say about himself, and his love for the timbales, and what he has to say to the new young and upcoming timbaleros!

Nicky where were you born, your birth name and where were you raised?

I was born in St. Francis Hospital in the Bronx on June 17th 1950 and raised in the Bronx. My Name is Nicholas Marrero Jr.

Was your family musical in any way?

My uncle Chuito Velez played guitar, piano and the accordion. He had his own Orchestra and would sometimes join the family on weekend parties. Like in most Puerto Rican families there was always something to celebrate or just get together to dance and party. My Brother Luis Sánchez played guitar and bass for many years with my uncle as well as with Belisario López y su charanga, the Plata Sextet, and Orlando Marin and his Orchestra.

 

Nicky Marrero’s musical family

 

Another shot of Nicky Marrero’s musical family

 

Young Nicky Marrero in 1964

 

When was the first time you heard a cowbell and when was the first time you listened to a mambo-ish or salsa type music or Latin music?

Quiet simply, at home! Plus, by parental composition, Puerto Ricans love their Spanish radio stations to keep up the latest cleaning products, soap operas, what movies are showing, what theaters are having live vaudeville acts, then If there is time left in the day—–The News!! There was Spanish music in all of them, from different Latin countries. Diversity!

What was the first band you were a member of professionally?

Orchestra Caribe, meaning I got paid. The going rate at that time for a 14 year old, was 10 to fifteen dollars, if the promoter didn’t high settled it out of town. And there were 12 of us plus the band boy, who just wanted to be part of the group, the guys just looked the other way, except maybe sometimes?

Who are past or present your favorite timbal players, conga players and bongo players?

Me, Me, and Me! Seriously, on timbales, Orestes Vilató and Orlando Marin. On conga, Orlando Vega and Johnny Rodriguez. On bongo, Johnny Rodriguez, Bobby Allende, and Orlando Vega.

 

Nicky Marrero with the late Charlie Palmieri

 

Nicky, what was you favorite band to play with, or you can mention a few?

Eddie Palmieri, Machito, Tito Puente, Fajardo, Tipica 73, Dizzie Gillespie, Jorge Dalto, but then I was part of at least forty other bands, and for different extended times. There’s not enough paper to explain it all but in a book.

 

 

Who would be your all-time favorite Latin orchestra leader?

Eddie Palmieri.

What is some advice that you would tell young timbaleros or percussionist who study the art of drumming?

To listen to the past records, and learn about each orchestra and its members and their backgrounds and where they came from and to follow their carriers. Learn to listen, and listen to learn!!! Practice the art of imitation to the exact with discipline. Learn that you are your greatest competition!! Broaden the many options of how to practice, they become limitless, as are your abilities.
Practice!!!

 

Nicky Marrero with Tito Puente – Photo by Allen Spatz

 

The Big 3, Machito, Tito Puente Sr. and Tito Rodriguez Sr., what is your opinion of them?

They were my heroes, and still are. I wouldn’t know whether to dance or play! There were many excellent dancers in my family, and I picked up on it very quickly, and became a very good dancer myself. It sometimes boggles me how some percussion players play and don’t know how to dance—really! That’s like a dentist pulling out teeth without first taking x-rays! Huh!

What is your all time favorite record or records?

Tito Rodriguez, Tito Puente, Machito, Cal Tjader, Cortijo y su Combo, the charangas of Aragon, Fajardo, Arcano, Estrellas Cubanas, La Sensacion,Johnny Pacheco, Ray Barreto, Charlie Palmieri, extra, many more. Conjuntos—Arsenio, Chapottin, Modelo, Roberto Fas, Rumbavana, Kuvavana, Estrellas de Chocolate, etc.

 

 

What is one or two of the favorite recording you performed on?

Unfinished Masterpiece by Eddie Palmieri; The Sun of Latin Music by Eddie Palmieri, the first to ever receive a Latin Grammy and the other 298 of them.

 

Eddie Palmieri – Unfinished Masterpiece

 

Eddie Palmieri – The Sun of Latin Music

 

Well, Nicky do you remember when you went to get your cha cha bell repaired by craftsman Pete Lugo. Let me ask why did you insist in getting that particular bell fixed and not just buy another new bell?

This bell was made with a special gage of a certain type of metal, and it had to be treated just the right way or it would ruin the bell forever. The sound of the bell became part of who I am, the study I put into investigating and analyzing their sounds and the types of material they are made of.

So tell us about your great current projects that you’re on.

Harlem River Drive” with Eddie Palmieri and “Indestructible” CD and documentary with Diego El Cigala.

Well, what are the future plans for Nicky Marrero musically and otherwise?

I am working on to fulfil my dream of starting my own project (orchestra) and record.

Have you seen the music scene changing somewhat and what do you think of that?

To bring it back to the dancers, with quality entertainment. We need more clubs of quality!!

 

 

Who are or were your favorite musicians to play with. Give us some names?

Nelson Gonzalez, Jimmy Bosch, Eddie Palmieri, Johnny Rodriguez, Willie Rodriguez and many more.

 

Nicky Marrero – Photo by Angel Morales

 

Now you tell us something Nicky

We need more in depth professional interviews such as yours. Also more radio stations with quality Latin cultural music past and present, with knowledgeable radio personalities!!

I would like to thank Nicky Marrero for his precious time, when I approached Nicky to this interview he was flying out to Lima, Peru with the Eddie Palmieri Orchestra! Thanks Nicky! El Monstruo del Timbal!

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Dafnis Prieto’s Si o Si Quartet to Perform at Arab American National Museum

Dafnis Prieto
Dafnis Prieto

Award-winning Cuban jazz master is set to perform on Friday, September 16 at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. This concert is part of the Global Fridays series.

Prieto’s innovative drumming techniques and compositions have had powerful effect on the global Latin and jazz scene. Also a gifted educator, Prieto has worked with bands led by Henry Threadgill, Steve Coleman and Eddie Palmieri, among others.

His discography includes About the Monks (2005), Absolute Quintet (2006), Taking the Soul for a Walk (2008), Live at the Jazz Standard (2009), Proverb Trio (2012) and Triangles and Circles (2015)

8:00 p.m.
Arab American National Museum
13624 Michigan Ave. in Dearborn.
Tickets

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