Tag Archives: Argentina

Artist Profiles: Orquesta Tipica Fernandez Fierro

Orquesta Tipica Fernandez Fierro

 

With the structure of a typical tango orchestra (four bandoneons, three violins, alto, violoncello, double bass and piano), a singer, a sound that has a lot in common with Osvaldo Pugliese Orchestra and a spirit associated with the rock culture, the Orquesta Tipica Fernandez Fierro is making its own way with new arrangements of traditional tangos and their own compositions.

Working as a cooperative they have recorded and released several CDs and have opened their own place in Buenos Aires called Club Atletico Fernandez Fierro where they play and organize a milongas and concerts.

Fernandez Fierro’s shows are an original mix that captivates not only old tango fans and dancers but also new generations getting into contact with tango music for the first time.

 

 

Vivo en Europa is described with humor by them as the “official-pirate cd of la Fernandez Fierro” since it was recorded live during one of their concerts in the European tour 2005.

We realized that the recording wasn’t meant to be distributed but, the energy that the orchestra displayed during this concert is something difficult to re-produce in a Studio… this is the energy of Fernandez Fierro live…” says Pablo Jivo.

 

Discography

* Envasado en Origen (2002)
* Destruccion masiva (2003)
* Vivo en Europa (2004)
* Mucha mierda (2006)
* Fernández Fierro (2009)
* Tics (2012)
* En vivo (2014)

Web Site http://www.fernandezfierro.com

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Artist Profiles: Julio A. Santillan

Julio A. Santillan – Photo by Pablo Leoni

Julio A. Santillán is a composer and guitarist originally from Tucuman, Argentina. His compositions combine elements from his home land folk music, jazz improvisation and classical music.

He has studied classical guitar at Instituto Superior de Musica (Argentina) under the direction of maestro Pablo Gonzalez Jasey. He graduated summa cum laude with a dual major in Classical Composition and Contemporary Writing and Production from Berklee College of Music (Boston, USA). He also studied jazz improvisation with Mick Goodrick.

Santillan received the 2004 Van Lier Fellowship, ASACPlus Award, Louis Armstrong Jazz Award, the Arif Mardin Award and the Contemporary Writing and Production Achievement Award.

As a composer/arranger he has produced music for documentary films, theater, recordings and live performances for artists around the world. Recently, Argentine virtuoso guitarist Victor Villadangos, has included guitar studies from Julio’s Book Cinco Estudios Criollos in his latest CD Guitar Music from Argentina vol. II (Naxos).

Julio also produced Colombian singer Marta Gomez’s Cantos de Agua Dulce, Entre Cada Palabra (Chesky Records) and La Ronda- Women of Latin America, Paula Ausente- Women of the World (Putumayo Records).

He has recorded and performed with many musicians from Argentina, Boston and New York including Oscar Stagnaro (Paquito D’Rivera), Livingston Taylor, Raul Carnota and Sandra Mihanovich.

Santillan has shared the stage with important artists such as Mercedes Sosa, John Mayer, Pablo Ziegler (Astor Piazzolla), Paquito D’Rivera, Bonnie Raitt, Tania Libertad, Diana Krall and Leon Gieco. He has performed and gave workshops in Argentina, Colombia, Finland, Greece, Canada and in more than fifty cities in the U.S. including New York, Los Angeles, Boston, Miami, Dallas and Washington D.C.

Julio A. Santillan has recorded over 30 CDs, including a play-along CD for The Latin Bass Book (Sher Music, by Oscar Stagnaro), two albums with the Pablo Ablanedo Octet (Freshsound records), four cds with Marta Gomez (BigSur records /Chesky Records)- one of which was chosen among the best 10 records of 2003 by the Boston Globe- and one by tango diva Katie Viqueira (Freshsound records)- Independent Music Award winner, 2005 best World Music Album.

Santillan led for almost 10 years Los Changos (trio & septet); an ensemble that performed his own compositions. The group has been featured in some of the most prestigious venues in the U.S. such as Blue Note (New York) and Regattabar (Boston).

Los Changos toured South America in four opportunities. At the moment Julio is working with a brand new project: the Julio Santillan Trio. He has released four cds with his compositions: Desde el Norte, Anit Negra, Nann and El Bosque de la Memoria (BigSur Records- CAP Records).

He was a faculty member at Manhattan College 2004-2009. Later he moved to Spain where he worked at a music school until 2012. He’s currently the director of the Orquesta-Escuela de Chascomús in buenos Aires.

Discography

Desde el Norte (Big Sur Records, 2001)
Anit Negra (Big Sur Records, 2003)
Nann (Big Sur Records, 2005)
El Bosque de la Memoria (Big Sur Records, 2008)
Argentinian Jazz in New York (Big Sur Records, 2009)
Un instante (Big Sur Records, 2011)
Meia laranja (Big Sur Records, 2012)
Va place tango? (Big Sur Records, 2015)

Bibliography

Cinco Estudios Criollos, a book with five studies for guitar based on Argentine folk rhythms (chacarera, milonga, cueca, guarania and malambo).

Website: www.juliosantillan.com

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Artist Profiles: Juan José Mosalini

Juan José Mosalini

Bandoneonist and master of the complex Argentine tango, maestro Juan José Mosalini was born in 1943 into a craftsman’s family who were passionate about music.

Juan Jose Mosalini started playing the bandoneon at the age of eight. Through his father’s influence, he absorbed the popular, traditional music of Argentina.
The young Mosalini was a professional musician by the time he was 17, after winning first prize in a competition “Nace una estrella” (A star is born) organized by Buenos Aires Television in 1961.

From 1962 to 1976, he composed, arranged, played and accompanied, working with the greatest orchestras and soloists in Argentina, including Astor Piazzolla, with whom he became close friend. During this period he founded the Guardia Nueva Quintet, which was to be one of the richest and must original experiences of the avant-garde tango phenomenon.

In 1977 he chose France as his new musical home, where he started to work with other Argentinean musicians. He formed the group Tiempo Argentino, which was received enthusiastically by the press. They completed several European tours and appeared at major Parisian venues, including the Palais des Arts and l’Olympia.

In 1978, in an innovative and experimental mode, Juan Jose Mosalini made a recording of solo bandoneon music. The recording (prefaced by Julio Codézar) revealed a musician in true dialogue with his instrument, delivering a blend of poetry and virtuosity. It was unanimously well reviewed and established Mosalini as a major artist.

In 1980, he founded a new ensemble, Canyengue, and then in 1982 the celebrated Mosalini-Beytelmann-Caratini Trio (bandoneon/piano/double bass), who went on to tour every continent, becoming particularly popular in the United States.

In 1983 Juan Jose Mosalini made a CD “Bordona” with the Trio, and in the following year he took part in the World Music Meeting in Baden-Baden as representative of Argentina, which also resulted in the recording of a CD.

Juan Jose Mosalini subsequently composed the music for a number of films, including “Double Face” and “Le Quatrième Pouvoir” by Serge Leroy, and two by director Stéphane Kurc: “Le Génie du faux” and “Un Coeur de marbre”, a four-part film for French television. At this time he also began to write a bandoneon method, commissioned by the French Minister of Culture.

1987 saw the release of “Imagenes” Trio’s second CD, on the “Label Bleu”, and in 1988 Juan Jose Mosalini started working on a Bandoneon Collection for music publishers Henry Lemoine. In 1989, he inaugurated the first European bandoneon course at the Gennevilliers Conservatory in Paris, where he has been teaching ever since.

With the flautist Enzo Gieco, and guitarist Atahualpa Yupanqui writing the libretto, he composed the cantata ‘La Parole Sacrée’, which had its first performance on June 21, 1989 at the Palais des Congrès in Nanterre, as part of the celebrations on the Bicentenary of the French Revolution.

In 1992 Juan Jose Mosalini started his Grand Orchestre de Tango, which has since appeared all over the world : Japan, USA (February 98, July 99 at the Hollywood Bowl), Sicily, the Netherlands, Germany, Norway ( several times from 1994 to 2000), Belgium, Canada (Montreal, Toronto), Greece (at the Megaron, Athens), Switzerland, Tunisia, and in France. He also released his second solo album, “Che Bandoneon”, and composed “Casi un Tango” (state commissioned).

In 1993 he toured Germany with the guitarist Roberto Aussel, and wrote compositions for tango orchestra and children’s choir with Enzo Gieco. In 1994 the Grand Orchestre de Tango released the CD ‘Bordoneo y 900″. Mosalini formed a quintet in the same year with the violinist Antonio Agri, and after Agri’s death, with his son Pablo Agri. The quintet appeared with great success in Japan, England and France.

His 1999 composition “Paris-Tango”, a choral poem on the words of Horacio Ferrer, in an arrangement by guitarist Leonardo Sénchez, had its debut with the Victoria Regional Choir under the baton of Michel Piquemal.

His passion for music in all its forms has brought him to work closely with classical musicians, leading to the discovery of a vast and perfectly adapted repertoire, particularly with string orchestra and symphony orchestra. Juan Jose Mosalini has played as soloist with the Enesco Quarter, the Orchestra de Picardie, the Orchestra National de Lille, the Orchestra National Bordeaux-Aquitaine, the Orchestra of Hong Kong, Spring Festival), the Bourgogne Camerata, the Orchestre de Radio-France, the Symphony Orchestra of Munich.

He recorded with Bass Normandie’s orchestra and the guitarist Leonardo Sanchez his own creation named “Outdoor and Urban Fantasies”.

At the ‘Buenos Aires Tango” Festival, Juan Jose Mosalini was awarded the Buenos Aires City Medal, in recognition of his work in the dissemination of Argentinean music throughout the world.

He recorded an album for the label Mañana, with the Strings Quartet Benaim named “Classic and Modern”, with Gustavo Beytelmann’s original compositions.

Discography

* Violento (Label Bleu Indigo, 1990)
* Che bandoneón (Label Bleu Indigo, 1992)
* Bordoneo y 900 (Label Bleu Indigo, 1994)
* One Man’s Tango: Best of Mosalini (Shanachie, 1998)
* Tango (Label Bleu Indigo, 2001)
* Imagenes (Acqua, 2008)
* Live Tango (Phantom Sound & Vision, 2008)
* Ciudad Triste (2009)

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Artist Profiles: Gustavo Santaolalla

Gustavo Santaolalla

Gustavo Santaolalla has been a force in Latin American music since the 1960s. He is one of a small group of musicians who created the hugely popular “Argentine Rock” movement, which included very creative bands that played progressive rock, jazz fusion, and other genres, sometimes combined with Latin American melodies and rhythms.

Santaolalla’s professional music career started in 1967 at the age of 16, when he founded the seminal group Arco Iris, making history as the pioneer in the fusion of rock and Latin American folk. Santaolalla’s work as bandleader (Arco Iris, Soluna, Wet Picnic); solo artist (Santaolalla, GAS, Ronroco); and record producer (Cafe Tacuba, Kronos Quartet) showcases his expertise in a wide variety of other musical styles.

For a few years, Santaolla lived between Buenos Aires and Los Angeles. Eventually, he settled in Los Angeles in the 1980s.

He has since become the most important name in Latin Alternative music in North America, having won Grammy awardss for his work with Cafe Tacuba and Juanes and has also produced critical and commercial successes for million-selling Mexican group Molotov, as well as Julieta Venegas, Maldita Vecindad, Caifanes, Leon Gieco, Los Prisioneros and Divididos, amongst others.

After the launching of his label Surco, he also played a major role in producing music for his label’s roster of artists, including Bersuit, Erica Garcia, Arbol and La Vela Puerca. Gustavo later entered the world of film music by scoring the music and producing the soundtrack for the Oscar-nominated and Cannes Film Festival-winning film Amores Perros, and again teamed up with Amores Perros director Alejandro Gonzalez Izarritu to work on his film, 21 Grams. Since then, he has composed numerous scores for film, TV and video games.

Santaolalla is the producer of Carnabailito, by Gaby Kerpel, the third Nonesuch project with which he has been involved. Proving once again his versatility, Santaolalla co-produced Kronos Quartet’s Nuevo, which pays homage to the rich musical styles of Mexico.

Gustavo Santaolalla’s musical style fuses rock, soul, African rhythms, and Latin American folk.

Discography

Santaolalla (1982)
Gas (1995)
Ronroco (Nonesuch, 1998)
21 Grams, soundtrack (Varese Sarabande, 2003)
The Motorcycle Diaries: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (Deutsche Grammophon, 2004)
Café de los Maestros (Universal, 2005)
Brokeback Mountain, soundtrack (Verve Forecast, 2005)
North country (Sony Music, 2005)
Babel (Concord Records, 2006)
I Come With The Rain (2009)
The Sun Behind the Clouds: Tibet’s Struggle for Freedom (2009)
Nanga Parbat (2010)
Biutiful (Relativity Music, 2010)
Dhobi Ghaat (2010)
On the Road (2012)
The Last of Us (Sony Masterworks, 2013)
August: Osage County (2013)
The Book of Life (Sony Masterworks, 2014)
Wild Tales (Quartet Records, 2014)
Camino (Sony Masterworks, 2014)
Making a Murderer (2015)
Borrowed Time (2015)
Before the Flood (2016)

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Artist Profiles: Gaby Kerpel

Gaby Kerpel

As a young man in Buenos Aires (Argentina), Gaby Kerpel studied classical music, including piano and harmony, as well as improvisation, before realizing that traditional composition was not the road he wished to follow.

In 1985, he was introduced to La Organizacion Negra, an ensemble that was creating an original type of theater that required singular music, which Kerpel created by learning to use technology as a creative tool. He composed for and performed with Negra for the next seven years while also collaborating on other dance, film, and video projects.

In 1993, Negra was dissolved and two of its members formed a new group, De La Guarda, which Kerpel was asked to join. His brother, Anibal Kerpel (a well known pioneer of Argentine progressive rock), and Gustavo Santaolalla produced the group’s 1995 CD.

Gaby Kerpel created the music for the long-running aerial performance-art/interactive theater shows of the De La Guarda troupe. He made his solo debut on a Nonesuch CD entitled Carnabailito, which came out on August 26, 2003.

Like De La Guarda’s shows, the songs on Carnabailito are driven by South American percussion sounds and inspired by the instruments and folk melodies of northeastern Argentina.

Kerpel describes his electronic approach to folkloric sound as “finding a way to express my experiences by passing a vision of Argentine music through the filter of my taste.”

Kerpel uses technology as a musical instrument, recording live performances on his computer and extracting the parts that he likes. Once they are digitized, he edits and transposes the samples, often manipulating them with special effects. Additionally, his music uses many types of South American traditional instruments, such as small, guitar-like cavaquinho (an instrument found in Brazil, Portugal and other lusophone countries) and Argentinean charango, as well as kalimbas and Argentine flutes. He also incorporates children’s’ instruments, such as an accordion he played in “Herias sin Herir.”

While touring with De La Guarda, he discovered instruments from other cultures, which he also used on Carnabailito, such as the erhu (Chinese violin) that is featured in “Se que no vas a volver.” Kerpel often records other musicians’ performances as well, creating samples such as the drums in “Xplicamelo,” which were taken from a recording he made of Enzo Cuenca playing different patterns with a stereo microphone (also used in “Cada vez que la visita” and “Sintenerte”).

Some of the sounds heard on Carnabailito were recorded in impromptu settings, such as hotel rooms. As Kerpel says, “I like to have a portable studio system so I can keep making new music while I travel. I think sometimes it is just a matter of capturing the moment.”

In the late 2000s, Kerpel’s project was King Coya.

Discography

* Carnabailito (Nonesuch, 2003)
* Fuerza Bruta (Warner, 2007)
* Cumbias de Villa Donde

Web site

http://www.gabykerpel.com

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Artist Profiles: Fierro Chifle

Fierro Chifle

Fierro Chifle included Juan Manuel Sanchez, Gabriel Santamaria and Pablo Vernieri. The trio was formed in Buenos Aires (Argentina) at the beginning of 2004. The tango guitar ensemble’s idea was to reconstruct the different periods of tango, including traditional as well as contemporary expressions. Sebastian Piana, Agustin Bardi, Anibal Troilo, Roberto Grela, Homero Exposito, Julian Plaza, Horacio Salgun and Astor Piazzolla, among others, are at the turning point of a musical and aesthetic search developed through a traditional sound.

The repertoire included tango classics adapted to dance rooms as wells as concert rooms. In addition, various genres such as Tango, Waltz and Milonga were incorporated and interlaced in a dynamic show.

Fierro Chifle is an idiomatic expression which means “to drive misfortune away”

Juan Manuel Sanchez graduated from Music School of Avellaneda, Buenos Aires. Pablo Vernieri and Gabriel Santamaria graduated from music conservatory of Morin, Buenos Aires.

They were all professional musicians and teachers in Buenos Aires.

Discography

Fierro Chifle (2006)

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Artist Profiles: Federico Aubele

Federico Aubele – Photo by Ezequiel Valdez

Inspired by the boleros, tangos, and bossa novas his mother played for him as a child growing up in Buenos Aires (Argentina), Aubele imbues this musical mix with elements of rock, dub, downtempo electronica, and jazz.

Aubele’s songs are at once intimate and personal, yet speak of broad human experiences. “Your inspiration always comes from your internal world and your feelings,” said Aubele, “But you expose that through your art in a way that other people can connect with. That’s where it starts becoming universal.”

Aubele has toured with such diverse artists as Thievery Corporation (whose label ESL he is signed to) and Diana Krall.

Discography

* Gran Hotel Buenos Aires (ESL072, 2003)
* Contigo (ESL068, 2003)
* Postales (ESL062, 2003)
* Esta Noche (ESL071, 2003)
* Panamericana (ESL117, 2007)
* Amatoria (ESL146, 2009)
* Amatoria Remixed (ESL 158, 2009)
* Berlin 13 (ESL, 2011)
* 5 (2013)

Web site www.federicoaubele.com

Credits

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Artist Profiles: Dolores Solá

Dolores Solá

Dolores Solá started her professional life as a singer at the same time she began her work as an actress in theater, musicals, films and TV. She studied acting with Augusto Fernandez, Cristina Moreira, and Joy Morris among others and took singing lessons with Maria Schwartz, Flora Yungerman, and Susana Naiditch. Dolores has also taken dancing courses: Flamenco with Marcela Suez, and Tango with Luis Solanas.

She has explored different types of music such as flamenco, rock, boleros and tango, but it was the latter she finally chose as best for her expression.

In 1995 Solá founded with Horacio Estol (Acho Estol) and Juan Valverde the tango group La Chicana while singing also in the Duet “Tangachas”.

In 1996 they started their first European Tango tour. Since, she has performed with her group for diverse audiences, from receptions to Emperors and Prime ministers to theatres and suburban Tango dance clubs.

In 2009 Solá released her solo album Salto Mortal that elements of cabaret, mixing Argentine tango with fado, pasodobles and waltzes. She recreates the Buenos Aires of the Belle Epoque. The song selection includes forgotten treasures that used to be performed by Carlos Gardel, Corsini and Magaldi.

Dolores Solá

Discography

* Ayer Hoy Era Mañana, with La Chicana (1997)
* Un Giro Extraño, with La Chicana (2000)
* Tango agazapado, with La Chicana (2006)
* Lejos
* Salto Mortal (2009)
* Revolución o picnic, with La Chicana (2011)
* Antihéroes y tumbas, with La Chicana (2015)
* La Pampa Grande, with La Chicana (2016)

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Artist Profiles: Cristobal Repetto

Cristobal Repetto

In his hometown of Buenos Aires, Cristobal Repetto brought back the traditional voice of the tango. In his early 20s, his voice could easily have been confused with the great voices of tango’s past. He leads a new generation of artists breathing new life into this genre.

Cristobal Repetto was born in 1979 on July 9. Repetto grew up surrounded by musicians, peñas (clubs where you can listen to tango and folk music) and town festivities where he quickly found a way to get on stage and show his early vocal abilities.

The emotion I feel when I see rock kids appreciate tango, or tango old-timers appreciating what I do, is indescribable,” says Repetto. “That’s the most amazing thing. True, I’m the singer, it is my voice… but it’s also about the songs, which go beyond tango and anybody can appreciate, despite its dark elements. In that sense, I agree with Adriana Varela: tango is the ultimate heavy metal.”

His self-titled album consists of tangos composed and first recorded in the 1920s to the 1960s. “Listening and listening: that’s what my life has been all about so far,” continues Repetto. “I grew up listening to music of every genre.

From an early age, I was shown a vast musical landscape by my parents, popular music of Argentine and of the world. In my family’s large record collection, there were albums by Mercedes Sosa, Tita Merello, Jorge Cafrune, Violeta Parra and Yupanqui. Later on, León Gieco, Fito and Spinetta arrived and, with them, my first songs. Then came the candombes, Caetano and my first bands. And eventually Corsini, Magaldi, the songstresses and ‘Polaco’ Goyeneche. Today it continues to be the music that gets me going.”

Repetto toured Spain as one of Bajofondo Tango Club’s opening acts with great success.

Discography

Cristobal Repetto (Surco/Universal, 2004)
Live at Café de la danse (2005)
Tiempo y silencio (2014)

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Artist Profiles: Dino Saluzzi

Dino Saluzzi – Photo by Bernhard Ley

Dino Saluzzi is one of the leading bandoneon players in the world. Timoteo “Dino” Saluzzi was born in Campo Santo in northern Argentina and led his first group at the age of 14. He began to play professionally while studying in Buenos Aires. It was in Buenos Aires, too, that he met and befriended Astor Piazzolla as the term “tango nuevo” began to gain currency.

Even though Piazzolla and Saluzzi always respected each other’s work, Dino has never cared to put a label on his own work. But he has emphasized in numerous interviews that his is not an “art music” but a music that comes out of life and attempts to express the emotions, thoughts and memories that accompany it. And this has remained as true of the work that stresses primarily his compositional projects such as the ongoing Kultrum collaboration with the Rosamunde Quartett – as it is of work in which improvisation has a larger role to play, as on Senderos.

From his first ECM album, recorded in 1982, Saluzzi’s music was well received by the world’s press.

In 1997 at the ECM Festival in Badenweiler, Germany, Dino Saluzzi and Jon Christensen, bandoneonist and drummer, came together originally to play music of Krzysztof Komeda with trumpeter Tomasz Stanko. The line-up, also included saxophonist John Surman, violinist Michelle Makarski and bassist Anders Jormin, went on to play on Stanko’s prize-winning album From the Green Hill and toured extensively.

That was an interesting band but difficult to present live because Dino often plays so quietly,” said Christensen. “As a drummer I actually like that, bringing the volume level right down. It’s very good for intense listening. And in fact you can play quietly and very dynamically. Anyway, Dino and I qot to be very good friends on the Stanko tours, we have a very good understanding. Of course, rm never going to be a tango drummer (laughter) and fortunately Dino doesn’t want that. I know he also appreciates the possibility just to play very openly and to see what happens…”

Senderos (paths in Spanish) is one of the most spontaneously-conceived of all Saluzzi’s albums. The Argentine master musician was in Oslo, working on another project in November 2002, when producer Manfred Eicher first proposed an immediate start upon a new solo album. “And then I got a phone call,” drummer Jon Christensen recalls, “How about coming over and adding some cymbals on a few tracks?’ And then it was, ‘Well, why don’t the two of you play a few things together?’ And about three hours later, we realized we’d made an album. I love to work this way, and it seems only to happen with this record company.”

On Senderos, you can almost hear the artists thinking aloud as they shape the music in the moment. Ten of the album’s pieces are duets. Some are Dino’s songs, some are freely improvised. There are also four solo bandoneon pieces that seem to melt with nostalgia for the simple life which Saluzzi left behind so long ago in the village of Campo Santo.

In recent years Dino Saluzzi has toured and recorded primarily with his son, guitarist José Maria Saluzzi, the two of them playing in trios with Marc Johnson (Cite de la Musique) and Palle Danielsson (Responsorium).

Ojos Negros was Saluzzi’s 2007 release. It is chamber music with inspirational roots in Argentine traditions, putting the emphasis on Dino Saluzzi’s finely-crafted compositions and adds the beautiful old tango by Vicente Greco that is the album’s title track. Interplay and improvisation also have roles to play in a recording that follows six years of duo concerts as well as ten years of collaboration between bandoneon master Saluzzi and the Rosamunde Quartet, of which cellist Anja Lechner is a founder member. They have taken their time to get this right.

A classical musician firstly, Anja Lechner’s interest in tango goes back some 25 years, when she formed a duo with pianist Peter Ludwig to play their German interpretations of the idiom. She gave her first concerts in Argentina in the early 1980s and made a point of looking for tango’s master musicians. But she first encountered Dino Saluzzi at a Munich concert where he played solo bandoneon. “He was playing a music that was really his own. When we finally began to play together I can say that I entered a new world.”

The shared work has been a gradual process of becoming freer with the material while respecting it, resulting in a very integrated music. Saluzzi praises the cellist’s commitment and stylistic independence: “Anja has become part of the music without losing her own identity. I think this is very important. She doesn’t try to imitate the tango players. She has her own sound and character, and this makes our project together culturally richer.”

Discography:

De Vuelta a Salta (RCA Camden, 1972)
La Cerrillana, with Los Chalchaleros (RCA Victor, 1972)
Bandoneón Tierra Adentro – Vol. 1 (RCA Camdon, 1973)
Bandoneón Tierra Adentro – Vol. 2 (RCA Victor, 1975)
Dedicatoria (Melopea, 1977)
Bermejo (Microfón, 1980)
Kultrum (ECM, 1982)
Once Upon a Time – Far Away in the South (ECM, 1985)
Volver with Enrico Rava (ECM, 1986)
Andina (ECM, 1988)
Argentina (West Wind Latina, 1991)
Mojotoro (ECM, 1991)
Rios, with Anthony Cox and David Friedman (veraBra, 1995)
Cité de la Musique (ECM, 1996)
Kultrum with the Rosamunde Quartett (ECM, 1998)
Responsorium (ECM, 2001)
Senderos (ECM, 2002)
Juan Condori (ECM, 2005)
Trio Tage, with George Gruntz and Thierry Lang (PJL, 2005)
Ojos Negros, with Anja Lechner (ECM, 2006)
El Encuentro (ECM, 2009)
Navidad de Los Andes, with Anja Lechner and Felix Saluzzi (ECM, 2011)
El Valle de la Infancia (ECM, 2014)

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