Jazz and Egyptian Intersections

Quadro Nuevo & Cairo Steps – Flying Carpet

Quadro Nuevo & Cairo Steps – Flying Carpet (Fine Music/Justin Time, 2017)

Flying Carpet is a project that brings together two German ensembles, Quadro Nuevo and Cairo Steps that intersect world music and jazz. On Flying Carpet the two ensembles are joined by an additional set of Middle Eastern musicians.

On Flying Carpet you’ll find a remarkable mix of lively world fusion, cinematic passages, Sufi chants, classical elements, jazz and lounge as well, where western classical music instruments interact with Middle Eastern instruments such as oud, ney, frame drums and darbuka.

Quadro Nuevo is a German acoustic world jazz quartet that was founded in 1996. Personnel: Mulo Francel on woodwinds; Dietmar Lowka on bass and percussion; Andreas Hinterseher on accordion; and Evelyn Huber on harp.

Cairo Steps includes German and Egyptian instrumentalists that combine Egyptian traditions with jazz and classical music, using western, Armenian and Middle Eastern instruments. Personnel: Basem Darwisch on oud; Rageed William on nay and duduk; Wolfgang Witteman on soprano and alto saxophones; Sebastian Müller-Schrobsdorff on grand piano; Matthias Frey on piano; Max Klass on percussion; Stefan Hergenröder on bass; Ragy Kamal on kanun; Hani Alsawaf on percussion; Shereen Azmy on violin; Emad Azmy on violin; Amir Akhnoukh on violin; Ahmed Tarek on violin; and Jan Boshra on cello.

Guests on Flying Carpet include Ali El Helwabi on vocals; Sheikh Ehab Younis on vocals; Dr. Ines Abdeldaiem on flute; and Ahmed Kawala on kawala.

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Maria Pomianowska & Reborn Announce Second Part of 2017 American Tour

Maria Pomianowska and Reborn

Renowned Polish musicians and composer Maria Pomianowska and Reborn will be performing in the American Midwest in September and October 2017, including stops at Bloomington, Indiana’s Lotus Festival and Minneapolis’s popular Cedar Theater.

Maria Pomianowska’s music combines European classical music, new music and the folk music traditions of Poland. She has collaborated with Yo-Yo Ma and Gonzalo Rubalcaba, studying the Sarangi in India under the guidance of P. Ram Narayan, teaching violin to members of the Japanese Imperial family and founding the first Ethnic Music Department at the Academy of Music in Krakow. But her greatest achievement could be the resurrection of some of her homeland’s lost medieval stringed instruments.

The ensemble’s discography includes The Voice Of Suka (Warner Music).

Maria Pomianowska & Reborn 2017 Fall Tour Dates:

9/16: Landfall Festival of World Music, Cedar Rapids, IA
9/19: University of Wisconsin, Whitewater, WI
9/30: Lotus Festival, Bloomington, IN
10/1: Lotus Festival, Bloomington, IN
10/6: The Cedar, Minneapolis, MN

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Petr Doružka Winner of 2017 WOMEX Professional Excellence Award

Petr Doružka

Czech journalist Petr Doružka is 2017’s recipient of the WOMEX Professional Excellence Award. He produces world music shows on both Prague Radio and Czech National Radio, as well as writing for many publications.

Doružka has been part of the World Music Charts Europe nearly since its inception (he joined in 1992), has served in the fRoots Magazine’s critics’ poll since 2001, and participated several times on the jury of the Sayan Ring festival in Siberia.

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Charming Vocals by Environmentally Conscious Artist

Lara Bello – Sikame (Biophilia Records, 2017)

The music Spanish vocalist Lara Bello crosses over various musical boundaries. On the delightful album Sikame she combines southern Spanish influences, jazz, fado, Latin American rhythms, and other global music styles.

Lara us currently based in the USA and worked with musician and producer Gil Goldstein on this recording. The list of international musicians that area on Sikame is quite impressive, featuring well-known names in the areas of jazz, world music and flamenco.

Equally fascinating is the album packaging. Sikame has a physical format that opens 20 panels inspired by origami. The packaging, however, does not contain a physical CD. Instead, it includes a unique code to download the album. The paper used is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. It’s hand-folded and printed using plant-based inks.

The line on Sikema includes Lara Bello vocals, percussion; Gil Goldstein on piano, accordion, rhodes, percussion; Romero Lubambo on guitar; Richard Bona on upright bass, electric bass; Lionel Loueke on guitar, vocals; Jorge Pardo on flute; Carles Benavent on mandolin; Leni Stern on ngoni; Samuel Torres on cajón and other percussion; and Rajiv Jayaweera on caxixi.

Sikame is remarkable album featuring the poetic and vocal talent of Lara Bello and some of the finest musicians in the New York and Spanish music scene.

Buy the digital download version of Sikame.

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Promise of the Real, Rising Roots Rock Talent

Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real – Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real (Fantasy, 2017)

The debut album of Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real showcases the talent of one of the rising stars of American roots rock. Lukas Nelson and his colleagues incorporate country, gospel and blues and combine it with rock, creating a captivating set of songs.

If Lukas’ voice reminds you of Willie Nelson, this is no coincidence, as Lukas is one of Willie’s sons.

To celebrate this debut album, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real are joined by an impressive cast of guests: Willie Nelson, members of Lucius, and Lady Gaga.

Promise of the Real includes Lukas Nelson on lead vocals and guitars; Tato Melgar on percussion; Anthony LoGerfo on drums; Corey McCormick on bass, vocals; Jesse Siebenberg on steel guitars, Farfisa organ, vocals; and Alberto Bof on piano, Wurlitzer, Hammond B3.

Guests include Bobbie Nelson on piano; Willie Nelson on guitar; Jess Wolfe and Holly Lessig of Lucius on vocals; Micah Nelson on piano and banjo; Lady Gaga on background vocals; Dave Palmer on piano; and John Grange on lap and pedal steel guitar.

Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real is an excellent debut album containing a fine example of rock rooted in American traditional sounds.

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If Wishes Were Horses

Kris Drever – If Wishes Were Horses

Kris Drever – If Wishes Were Horses (Reveal Records, 2016)

Guitarist and vocalist Kris Drever departs from music rooted in British Isles tradition on If Wishes Were Horses. The album is a singer-songwriter effort with Drever focusing on lyrics. The acoustic folk arrangements are much more basic than what you would find in his regular band, Lau.

Guests include Ian Carr on guitars, trumpet and vocals; Euan Burton on bass, vocals and keyboards; Louis Abbott on drums and vocals; and Yolanda Quartey on vocals.

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The WOMAD 2017 Experience

 

Everyone who loves music needs to make a pilgrimage to the UK’s phenomenal annual WOMAD – World of Music Arts and Dance Festival – founded in 1980 by Peter Gabriel,  womad.co.uk.  To take in a mammoth feast of the world’s greatest music with kindred souls while one with nature in the English countryside is unimaginable pleasure and fun.  In its 35th year it’s a fantastic festival experience – with superlative marks for organization, production, and programming.

 

 

Charlton Park, the WOMAD site, is situated near Malmesbury in the midst of the lush, fertile farmlands of Wiltshire County where the daytime light moves swiftly from brooding shadows to brilliant sunlight.  (Wiltshire is locus for Stonehenge and Avebury Stone Circle.) This year’s edition had rain showers and sprinkles with occasional patches of blue skies.  There is no such thing as a raincheck in England.  Wellington boots are de rigeur.  As Simon Broughton, Songlines editor in chief remarked, “WOMAD people are resilient.”  (Songlines Magazine had a huge, cheery tent spanning at least 20 meters across for artists’ cd autographs and magazine sales. It was also the best shelter from rain spells.)

We have nothing like it in the U.S.  WOMAD 2017 took place at the end of` last month from Thursday July 27th to Sunday, the 30th.  100 artists from 50 countries. Huge performance tents  loomed up over the park’s several acres.  35,000 fans including masses of children, all of whom camped out in thousands of tents. (There are also nearby charming cottages if pampering is your style.)  It’s the British spirit of adventure that beckons locals and astounds internationals.  As well as the immersion in fresh-air countryside culture.  Yoga and Tai Chi classes were the mid morning rousers.  Add children’s activities, international cooking classes, music and dance workshops, and scores of food booths with tastings from Goa to Tibet.

Programming, so keenly attuned to what’s out there on the music markets, included several of the great established acts in the world music realm: Orchestra Baobab, Oumou Sangare, Seu Jorge, Bonga, Roy Ayers with Seun Kuti & Egypt 80, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Toko Telo, and Savina Yannatou.  Rapidly gaining international favor, Cuba’s Dayme Arocena, Estonia’s Trad.Attack, China’s Zhou Family Band, and Sudan’s Alsarah and the Nubatones all won over new fans.

However, my goal was to catch some artists rarely if ever seen in the U.S., whom I’d never seen before, and whose recordings I admire.  Here are the standouts.

 

Vigüela – Photo by Evangeline Kim

 

Based in Castilla-La Mancha (the land of Don Quixote), Vigüela, one of the greatest folk groups from the heart of Spain caught my ear last year with their splendid CD, “Temperamento” (ARC Music).  There are wedding and harvest songs and songs to accompany daily chores – even sheep-shearing music on the recording.  Viguela’s exuberant acoustic WOMAD concert seemed to make the earth sing in joyous, celebratory unison.  The excitement in the crowds was infectious as everyone clapped along to the rhythms with shouts of “Olé!”  I was certain how thrilled the spirit of the late BBC London’s radio presenter, musicologist, and writer, Charlie Gillett, must have been to welcome Vigüela to his dedicated BBC 3 WOMAD stage.

 

For over 3 decades, the group of 5 has managed to preserve their village songs with all the dedicated finesse and detail that could have been lost with time.  The members played the 12-string bandurria mandolin, lute, rebec fiddle, guitar, friction drum, tambourines, and castanets with aplomb, flair, and camaraderie.  They incorporated some of their recorded percussive ranch household utensils: spoon and pan, glass bottle, mortar, stones, cowbells, sieve, and sheep-shearing scissors.  The air rang with Vigüela’s renditions of sprightly dance music – the fandango, malagueña, seguidilla, and jota.  Strong, melismatic voices enraptured with fervent passion.  Towards the end a couple swirled and whirled to a jota dance song.  The group has injected ancient folk songs with rousingly fresh, dynamic, and revitalized new energies.  Vigüela is triumphant assertion of life itself.  They’re a classic.

 

Grupo Canalón de Timbiquí – Photo by Evangeline Kim

 

The dense mangrove rainforest swamps on the Pacific coast of Colombia are home to most of the 5 million Afro-Colombians in the country.  There, in the small Timbiqui village of 20,000, surrounded by river waters, artisanal mining, hand panning for gold flakes, is one of the main local industries.  And the home origins of Nidia Gongora’s Grupo Canalón de Timbiquí.  Canalón refers to the chute through which earth and gold bits are funneled.  Women sift through and rinse the sediment pourings in river waters in search of gold.  Born in that environment, Nidia Gongora and her early high school mates formed Grupo Canalón de Timbiquí in 2003.

Nidia Gongora now has two musical personae:  her current CD “Curao,” is her first solo album. The recording is a dazzling electronically driven collaboration with British DJ and producer Quantic with an urban Latina feel.  She is better known and recognized as the ringleader of the award-winning, folkloric Grupo Canalón de Timbiquí.  Both styles are rooted in Colombia’s Afro-Amerindian currulao music.

Nidia’s onstage vocal accompaniment featured 3 other women dressed in sombreros and bright yellow and blue ruffled dresses.  They led complex harmonies in call and response choral formation with backing polyrhythmic percussive textures by 4 men players on marimba, and hand and stick drums.  Nidia herself carried and shook the women’s emblematic guasa shaker.  The group performed their region’s syncopated, gently rolling Afro-Amerindian music, sung for generations by village women as they panned for gold, cooked, breastfed, washed clothes in the river, and praised patron saints.  Clearly, the women in Timbiqui society carry the day, bringing musical upliftment and determination, lightheartedness and faith, to what is grueling, tedious work.  Given the WOMAD showers this year, the Grupo Canalon’s repertoire, originating in Timbiqui’s environment of abundant rain and river waters, was a concert consonant and a cleansing festival blessing.

 

Ifriqiyya Electrique – Photo by Evangeline Kim

 

Utterly unorthodox musically, yet exceeding expectations of a powerful performance, Ifriqiyya Electrique delivered a thunderous concert based on modalities of Tunisian ritual trance possession.  Their source lies in the Djerid Oasis region, where marginalized Africans worship the 13th century black Sufi saint, Sidi Marzuq.  The saint was born in Timbuktu, displaced as a captive, and eventually freed due to his prodigious miracles.  Every year over a few days in mid-summer, sacred psychic healing ceremonies known as “Banga” take place, dedicated to Sidi Marzuq.  Spirits (ruwahine) are summoned.  Mesmerized by the incessant beating rhythms amidst clouds of burning benzoin incense, Banga devotees become possessed and fall into convulsive trance. Ifriqiyya Electrique’s concert was a stylized musical enactment of the actual ritual.  Their performance strikes a remarkable balance between the rational and irrational.

The group’s central force are 3 adherents of Sidi Marzuq from Tozeur (Tarek Sultan, Yahya Chouchen, Youssef Ghazala).  At maximum volume, they played clattering qaraqab metal castanets and drum, measuring out the group’s sung, declamatory praises to Allah, the Prophet Mohammed, saints, and benevolent spirits.  Serving as interpolated sonic vectors, the guitarist (Francois R. Cambuzat) and bass player (Gianna Greco) with added electronic effects amplified and elevated the Banga grooves with serious rock swagger.

Part of the performance impact lay in the screened footage of the live ritual filmed in Tozeur: the percussionists leading the saint’s followers, nodding and weaving, stumbling and falling in wild, ecstatic trance (although the truncated screen needed to have filled the stage as full backdrop).  “Brilliantly conceived,” as Simon Broughton has noted, the performance in its visual and sound totality can make one feel part of the Banga ritual experience.  Following the concert, the percussionists from Tozeur came offstage and as they continued to play their metal castanets, children surrounded them, stepping to their beats in fascination.

 

Parvathy Baul and Somjit Dasgupta – Photo by Evangeline Kim

 

Rapture, sheer rapture, was my overwhelming reaction as I watched and listened to Parvathy Baul together with Somjit Dasgupta, who played one of India’s rarest string instruments, the sursringar. I remained captivated by them until their very last notes.

A Bengali Baul spiritual singer and a “sadhak” for more than 3 decades, Parvathy Baul has one of the most beautiful voices today on the Indian subcontinent. She’s a foremost female in the Baul male-dominated tradition.  Her WOMAD repertoire was drawn from yogic Baul mysticism, tracing back 15 centuries and more.  Over time, it has absorbed elements from Sufism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Vaishnavism, and Tantra.

With exquisite phrasing and a palette of nuanced melodic tonalities, Parvathy gave soulful cry to her intense emotions. By moments imploring, by others deeply solemn or merrily elated, she reached blissful completion with each song.  She spun around as she sang, her long streaming dreadlocks splaying forth.  High on mystical divine love, she imparted infinite peace, wresting herself free of earthly attachments.  Her sense of coordination was impressive – simultaneously plucking her ektara and tapping her duggi drum strapped to her waist; ankle bells ringing, she’s a one-woman minstrel band.

Yet it was Somjit Dasgupta’s shimmering, meditative, sitar-like glissandos and bass-pitched sarod sonorities on his sursringar that added luminous dimensions to Parvathy’s presence.  They haven’t recorded together, but they must. They are delirious enchantment.

Just as I was leaving to prepare for my flight back to New York, I noticed masses of Afro Celt Sound System fans, including droves of teenagers and young children cramming the Charlie Gillett stage grounds.  Everyone was dancing in the passing rain shower. Steaming heat rose from the wet grass as those Wellington boots stomped away.  Farther along on the festival grounds, thousands covered the field facing the main Open Air Stage.  More dancing to classic reggae tunes by the inimitable Toots and the Maytals.  In the distance, the festival’s illuminated ferris wheel was glowing like a giant silvery moon. The world was happy.

Don’t miss WOMAD next year, July 26-29, 2018.  (You might get hooked.)

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Modern Songs Rooted in Burkinabe Jeli Tradition

Massa Dembele – Mezana Dounia (Izniz Recordings, 2017)

Mezana Dounia is the first album recorded by jeli (praise singers, social commentators and historians, also known as griots) musician Massa Dembele from Burkina Faso. Dembele is a well-known surname within the jeli community.

Massa Dembele writes songs about embracing diversity within Burkina Faso’s ethnic groups, calls out to put an end to forced marriages of young women, the loss of superficial youth beauty, fear of the modern world, betrayal, the way of the jeli, and Massa’s grandmother Yedini.

Mezana Dounia is an acoustic album that highlights Massa Dembele’s gratifying vocals and the hypnotic kamele ngoni (a West African harp-lute). Massa Dembele recorded the album in Burkina Faso’s capital and played all the instruments, including percussion instruments such as calabash, jembe and bara drums.

Two guests appear on Mezana Dounia, Ali Diara on bala (balaphon) and Mamadou Dao on folikan flute.

The original lyrics in Mande are available in English, translated by Massa Dembele and Sarah Lajoie Flyng Ouédraogo at www.izniz.com/massa-demebele.pdf.

Buy Mezana Dounia

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Seductive Afro-Venezuelan Party Songs

Betsayda Machado & La Parranda El Clavo – Loé Loá – Rural Recordings Under the Mango Tree (Odelia, 2017)

Loé Loá – Rural Recordings Under the Mango Tree is a set of Afro-Venezuelan celebratory songs. It’s vibrant, hip-shaking roots music featuring vocals and drums.

The album includes a large multigenerational cast of singers and percussionists, many of them cocoa farmers, from a small village called El Clavo in the tropical Barlovento region of Venezuela.

Betsayda Machado & La Parranda El Clavo is one of the acts selected to perform at the influential WOMEX world music showcases later this year in Poland. They are currently touring the United States and will be back in 2018.

 

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Ladilikan by Trio Da Kali and Kronos Quartet Tops the Transglobal World Music Chart in September 2017

Ladilikan (World Circuit), a collaboration between Malian act Trio Da Kali and acclaimed American string ensemble Kronos Quartet is the number album of the Transglobal World Music Chart in September 2017.

Trio Da Kali includes some of the finest musicians in Mali: vocalist Hawa Kassé Mady Diabaté, bala master Lassana Diabaté (of AfroCubism) and bass ngoni vistuoso Mamadou Kouyaté (son of Bassekou Kouyaté).

David Harrington (of Kronos Quartet) described the recording as “one of the most beautiful collaborations Kronos has had in our first 40 years.”

 

 

Buy Ladilikan

More about the chart: http://www.transglobalwmc.com

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