Dominican Merengue Inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

merengue musicians - Photo courtesy of Ministerio de Cultura de República Dominicana
merengue musicians – Photo courtesy of Ministerio de Cultura de República Dominicana

Today, November 30, 2016, UNESCO announced that Dominican merengue music and dance was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

The merengue is considered part of the national identity of the Dominican Republic. It is present in people’s daily lives – from their education to social gatherings and celebrations, and even political campaigning.

In 2005, merengue was recognized by presidential decree with November 26 declared National Merengue Day. Merengue festivals are held in cities in the Dominican Republic like Santo Domingo and Puerto Plata every year.

Danced in couples, flirtatious gestures are used as participants move in circles to the rhythm of music played on instruments such as the accordion, drum and saxophone. It is a dance that is usually introduced to learners at an early age.

Knowledge and skills on the practice are transmitted through observation, participation and imitation. The merengue attracts people of different social classes, which helps to promote respect and coexistence among individuals, groups and communities.

The north of the country is considered to be the cradle of merengue with the area of influence extending to Puerto Rico, the United States of America and the Caribbean region.

The merengue is also popular in other Latin American countries such as Venezuela and Colombia where variations have emerged, and countries in Central America.

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Artist Profiles: Ismail Lumanovski

Ismail Lumanovski
Ismail Lumanovski

Ismail Lumanovski, well-known for his lively virtuosity, was born in Bitola, Macedonia and started playing the clarinet at age eight. He has performed throughout the United States, Europe, the Middle East, and China to critical acclaim. Lumanovski participated in the New York début of the Carter Clarinet Concerto with musicians from the New Juilliard Ensemble and the Lucerne Festival Academy with composer Pierre Boulez.

Throughout the years, Lumanovski has performed with many significant musicians and orchestras, including Die Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie, the Berklee Middle Eastern Fusion Ensemble, the World Youth Symphony Orchestra, the Palestine Youth Orchestra, the Macedonian Philharmonic Orchestra, Marcel Khalife, Al Di Meola, and Husnu Senlendirici.

A skilled improviser and performer of Macedonian, Turkish and Gypsy music, he has toured with the New York Gypsy All-Stars and is also one of the founders of The Secret Trio.

Ismail Lumanovski is the winner of numerous competitions, including the 23rd, 24th and 25th Clarinet Competition of Macedonia, the Juilliard Clarinet Concerto Competition, the International Young Artist Competition in Bulgaria, the National Folk Music Competition in Macedonia and the Andreas Makris Clarinet Competition in Colorado.

Furthermore, Lumanovski received the “Fine Arts Award” twice at the Interlochen Arts Academy, and 1st prize at the Arriaga Chamber Music Competition. He holds a Bachelor of Music degree and Master of Music degree from the Juilliard School of Music. He studied with Charles Neidich and Ayako Oshima.

Discography:

Soundscapes, with The Secret Trio (Traditional Crossroads, 2012)

Dromomania, with New York Gypsy All Stars (New York Gypsy All-Stars, 2015)

Three of Us, with The Secret Trio (Traditional Crossroads, 2015).

Website: www.ismaillumanovski.com

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Results of the 31st Annual fRoots Critics Poll 2016

froots_poll_2016

The winners of the 31st annual fRoots Critics Poll for Albums Of The Year were revealed November 25 by fRoots Editor Ian Anderson and presenter Kathryn Tickell during BBC Radio 3’s Word On 3 show.

Album of 2016

Shirley Collins – Lodestar (Domino)

Shirley Collins - Lodestar
Shirley Collins – Lodestar

 

Compilation, Re-issue or Historical Album

Various Artists – Urgent Jumping! Urgent Jumping! East African Musiki Wa Dansi Classics (Stern’s)

Various Artists - Urgent Jumping! Urgent Jumping! East African Musiki Wa Dansi Classics
Various Artists – Urgent Jumping! Urgent Jumping! East African Musiki Wa Dansi Classics

 

Best Packaged Album

Various Artists – Music Of Morocco From The Library Of Congress, Recorded By Paul Bowles 1959 (Dust To Digital)

Various Artists - Music Of Morocco
Various Artists – Music Of Morocco

 

Editor’s Choice Album (for micro independent label releases only)

Alden, Patterson & Dashwood – Call Me Home (AP&D)

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Interview with Kseniya Tsoy of World Culture Open and Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

This autumn, a colorful world music caravan swept through China and Korea in the form of world music festivals that mark the start of a growing pan-Asia world music initiative powered by World Culture Open and World Music Shanghai. Kseniya Tsoy is part of the External Relations of World Culture Open – the creative planning team of Jeju World Music Oreum Festival. We interviewed her to find out more about the world music scene and cross-cultural collaboration in Asia.

Tell us a little about your organization World Culture Open.

Kseniya Tsoy – World Culture Open is an international network cultivating sustainable platforms for interactive cultural exchange through creative collaboration. In other words, we believe that culture is our common humanity and what unites us all beyond our differences, and we are dedicated to facilitating creative programs – the common ground for different cultures, ideas and dreams to meet and learn about each other, and experience the beauty of diversity through creative expressions.

What motivates you and your team to do the Jeju World Music Oreum Festival?

A music festival is a great example of such a platform. Music is our common language that we all understand beyond the verbal and the written, and so for us a world music festival is an occasion that is more than just a festival, but a great chance to introduce different cultures in a most attractive and beautiful way, easily understood by all. That’s why we were very excited to develop this new world music festival in Asia.

 

 Hana Art (South Korea) performing infectious rhythms at the Jeju stage at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

Hana Art (South Korea) performing infectious rhythms at the Jeju stage at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

 

What is the Jeju World Music Oreum Festival?

Jeju World Music Oreum Festival 2016 is the first of its kind world music festival in Jeju Island. In a way the festival is an introduction of world music to the inhabitants of the island, and it is about sharing the beautiful island and its unique culture with the world.

Many would probably wonder what is “oreum” in the festival’s name! A signature feature of Jeju Island is its 368 oreums or parallel volcanoes, dotting the island’s landscape. Each oreum has its own flora and fauna, and there are not even two oreums that are exactly alike. Oreums are the lungs of the island’s ecosystem and are an important element of Jeju culture. An oreum is a special place for recreation and healing. Bringing world music to the island, we wanted to pay tribute to the island’s unique nature: the crater of an oreum, resembling an amphitheater, boasts perfect natural acoustics, and so is a perfect music venue. We envisioned the festival as a musical retreat in the heart of nature.

 

Shanren (China) at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival
Shanren (China) at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

 

You must be approached by numerous booking agents and artists. How do you choose the artists? What elements do you take into account aside from music quality?

For us, the cultural aspect of the world music plays a very important role. Aside from “quality” and popularity of the musicians, we also care for the artists’ dedication to the unique cultures that shape their style and music, and their passion to introduce and share their cultures with the world.

Are there are artists you tried to book for this year’s festival that you were not able to bring to South Korea?

One of the main reasons for bonding the world music festivals across countries is to make it easier and more attractive for bands to come to Asia, giving them a chance to take a journey through cities and countries of the region and play at multiple festivals. So this year we had a very good response from the artists who were glad to join the Jeju Festival after their tours in China.

 

Trio Kazanchis (Switzerland) at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival
Trio Kazanchis+1 (Ethiopia/Netherlands/France) at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

 

What concerts were the most popular this year? Did you notice a change in the audiences’ interest in world music?

Since the audience was mostly local, it was natural that there were more people at the performances of the renowned Korean bands. But that is exactly the reason for creating an initiative such as a world music festival – to introduce new treasures along with old favorites.

It was absolutely lovely to see how the audience, for a band new to the island, would keep growing from the band’s first song to the last, and how people would not want the music to stop when they had started the journey to the world they didn’t know before. It is a beautiful effect of a discovery – coming with no knowledge and expectations and having discovered something that opens your mind and broadens your horizons.

We hope the festival has kindled the locals’ interest in the “other” music, and that this interest will only grow.

What would you like music fans to come away with from Jeju World Music Oreum Festival?

Music has the beautiful power of transcending our judgmental thinking and reaching right into our hearts. We are all so unique and we play music in so many different styles and ways, and yet they are all just different expressions of one music, and that’s why it has this huge universal bonding power.

It feels so natural amidst the music playing to take a stranger’s hand and dance together. It is only a moment shared together, but after that you are not strangers anymore. We had an example of two fans, Eugene and Natalia, who stayed together with us throughout the whole festival, and by the end of it they didn’t want to say goodbye to the musicians who had touched their hearts, so they took the artists who stayed after the festival around the island – the artist-audience relationship blossomed into a beautiful friendship. In their very own words, “Being surrounded by the nature of Jeju and music from all over the world, it felt like a pleasant and intense trip through different countries and cultures. It was an amazing place to discover original music and make new great friends.” We hope this is what everybody would take away from the festival. They would leave with new knowledge of different cultures and friendships beyond borders.

 

DAGADANA (Poland Ukraine) at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival
DAGADANA (Poland Ukraine) at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

 

Are there any artists that you enjoyed working with the most?

We genuinely love working with all the different artists. Everyone has different styles and approaches, and each connection is a great opportunity to learn about “another way”, see our own reflections in that, and grow together.

Do the artists who perform at Jeju World Music Oreum Festival also participate in workshops and other events for the community?

Yes, this is an important part of the festival and all of our other programs: to provide more opportunities for audience-artist interaction beyond the stage.

For the Jeju festival this year, we had a conference in the program which featured local artists, and international participants were welcome to learn about the Jeju culture. Our Chinese partners also have kept the beautiful tradition of artists participating in workshops and events for the community through all the years.

 

 Folksong Troupe Soriwat (Jeju) at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

Folksong Troupe Soriwat (Jeju) at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

 

If anyone visited the island of Jeju for the first time, what stores, music venues and sightseeing places would you recommend?

The island of thousands of myths and legends, Jeju is a designated UNESCO natural heritage site, and has recently been proclaimed as one of the eight natural wonders of the world for its distinct picturesque landscapes and stunning ocean sunrises. The eco-friendly island has become the “it” place in Korea and neighboring countries, resulting in more and more visitors over the past few years.

The island is a vibrant and creative place, and one will find many local cafes and bars featuring local artists, often collaborating with friends from mainland Korea and beyond. We would recommend visitors to check out a gig by the local band “Jeju Dialect” when you are in town.

Stroll along the streets of Jeju Old Town – which are being revitalized with arts and culture these days – to catch some local street art and music performances. In the center of Jeju city “Qoomza Salon” is a must for checking out occasional special performances and events. In another city of the island, Seogwipo, one will be delighted to discover the “Jeju Art Station” and its eclectic treasures.

What’s your relationship with World Music Shanghai?

Though music is not World Culture Open’s only sphere of work, we definitely see it as a very important aspect for it is a common thread running across every culture, as mentioned earlier. For this, we are happy to be in partnership with World Music Shanghai, whose team is very passionate about and highly appreciative of music, and in particular world music. World Music Shanghai has demonstrated unwavering dedication over the years, with their best efforts to preserve authentic music of diverse Chinese ethnic groups, and introduce the world’s vibrant cultural diversity to Chinese audiences through music. Recognizing the importance of music and its lasting and sustainable influence, we value our collaboration and plan exciting large-scale and small-scale projects together besides the festival.

 

Yang Guanglei and Kseniya Tsoy at the official launch of the partnership between World Music Shanghai and World Culture Open in Shanghai, China 2016
Yang Guanglei and Kseniya Tsoy at the official launch of the partnership between World Music Shanghai and World Culture Open in Shanghai, China 2016

 

In addition to South Korea and China, what other Asian countries do you collaborate with?

Since World Culture Open is first and foremost a network, we are always open to new collaborations, and different projects have been created naturally with/in different countries.

In general, being based and active in Asia right now, we envision building a strong collaborative network in the region, to bring different parts of Asia together through cultural exchange and creative collaboration.

Can you give us an advance of what to expect for the 2017 Festival?

Having completed the first edition of the festival, we have lessons and feedback to learn from, and also have many new fresh ideas that came up during and after the festival. We are currently in the process of incorporating both while being open to new partnerships and collaborations, and are excited to see where it takes us from here.

 

The crowd goes wild at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival
The crowd goes wild at 2016 Jeju World Music Oreum Festival

 

How do you see the future of world music in East Asia?

The World Music scene in Asia may not be as busy as the scene in the west, but the rise of people’s interest in World Music is evident over time. Asia itself has abundant amazing talents shaped by different unique cultures, some of which are still yet to be discovered and appreciated on the world scene. Likewise, with increasing collaboration between regions across our world, East-West and North-South, more exciting music treasures will be introduced to Asia, and ultimately, we hope it will give birth to special intercultural collaborative projects. This time, we have seen a beautiful example of Dagadana (Poland-Ukraine) performing together with the North Lab (Inner Mongolia, China) on one stage, and this combination of original Slavic melodies with the sounds of steppes and throat singing was … amazing, fascinating, dramatic! Such fusion uncovers culture as a whole – showing through the sounds of music the amazing array of humanity’s creative expressions cultivated over thousands years. It breaks your mind and heart open.

We believe that in Asia we are coming to the point at which we fully recognize the beautiful roots and originality of our own music and welcome new cultures into collaboration, which will push the boundaries of our own potential, and take us and our cultures into a new phase of evolution.

We hope to see new influences coming to Asia and more cultural fusion projects emerge.

As an inter-cultural organization, we can only say that we will continue to work on facilitating more “made in Asia” cross-cultural collaborations, as well as developing new platforms for such creative cultural exchange, which includes initiatives such as music festivals and beyond.

Websites:

World Culture Open

More about Jeju

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Walila: The Modern Sound of North African Sacred Music

Walila: The Modern Sound of North African Sacred Music
Walila: The Modern Sound of North African Sacred Music

The 19-minute documentary Walila: The Modern Sound of North African Sacred Music is now available online. The inspiring film, directed by independent filmmaker Reed Rickert, follows music producer Daniel Masson, best known for his Buddha Bar compilations.

Masson has the objective of creating a cultural bridge between the Western and Arab worlds. He traveled to Morocco to record musicians for his latest electronic music album. As the film develops to the final live performance of the album at the Festival of Sacred Music of Fes, the question in Daniel’s mind remains: Will this new blend of music styles be accepted by the Moroccan audience as well as the Western audience?

Walila: The Modern Sound of North African Sacred Music from Reed Rickert on Vimeo.

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Superb World Music and Roots Programming at Savannah Music Festival 2017

Earls of Leicester
Earls of Leicester

The Savannah Music Festival 2017 will present an impressive set of world music and American roots sounds. The festival will take place from March 23 to April 8, 2017.

The lineup includes acclaimed Québécois traditional ensembles Le Vent du Nord and De Temps Antan; Canary Island timple (a small Spanish guitar) maestro Germán López; Dom Flemons; Foghorn Stringband; Caleb Klauder & Reeb Willms; cellist and vocalist Leyla McCalla; Haitian vodou drum and dance ensemble Chouk Bwa Libète; dobro maestro Jerry Douglas with celebrated bluegrass band the Earls of Leicester; Molsky’s Mountain Drifters; Irish accordionist Máirtín O’Connor; Geno Delafose & French Rockin’ Boogie; Holt & Coleman; banjo player Noam Pikelny; Sufi singer Sanam Marvi; 80-year-old virtuoso multi-instrumentalist Hermeto Pascoal; mandolinist Danilo Brito’s choro quintet; Edgar Meyer & Mike Marshall; and admired Ukrainian band DakhaBrakha with an original score for the 1930 Dovzhenko silent film, Earth.

Tickets to the 2017 festival are available online at savannahmusicfestival.org, by phone at 912-525-5050 and in person at 216 E. Broughton Street in Savannah.

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Ismail Lumanovski, Tamer Pinarbasi & Ara Dinkjian to Perform at Roulette

The Secret Trio - Photo by Onur Gunay
The Secret Trio – Photo by Onur Gunay

The Secret Trio is set to perform at Roulette on Saturday, December 3, 2016. The Secret Trio is an ensemble featuring three remarkable musicians rooted in Turkish, Balkan Roma (Gypsy) and Armenian music. The three artists came together to create a new form of chamber music. Not bound by a single tradition, they perform original pieces and traditional melodies that incorporate the microtonal modes and improvisation of the Middle East, dance rhythms of the Balkans, and elements of jazz,rock, and classical music.

The trio includes Ismail Lumanovski, a virtuoso clarinetist and member of the New York Gypsy All-Stars; Tamer Pinarbasi, a master kanun (zither) player and a member of the New York Gypsy All-Stars; and Ara Dinkjian, one of the world’s finest ud (fretless lute) players, who is best known as the founder of the highly influential and groundbreaking instrumental group Night Ark.

The Secret Trio was formed in 2010 and has two albums on the Traditional Crossroads label: Soundscapes (2012) and Three of Us (2015).

Roulette, 509 Atlantic Ave at 3rd Ave near BAM & Barclays Center, Brooklyn
Tickets at robertbrowningassociates.com
Tickets: $30; seniors, students $26

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Malian Music Stars BKO Quintet to perform in UK

BKO Quintet
BKO Quintet

Malian music sensation BKO Quintet is set to perform in Manchester and Liverpool this month as part of a 7-date UK tour. The band will be promoting its debut album Bamako Today.

BKO Quintet – UK Tour Dates 2016

27th November
Hootananny, London
free admission

28th November
Sound Control, Manchester
Tickets

29th November
The Parish, Huddersfield
Tickets

30th November
Student Workshop, Liverpool
sold out

1st December
24 Kitchen Street, Liverpool
Tickets

2nd December
The Canteen, Bristol
free admission

3rd December
Duke of Cumberland, Whitstable
Tickets: 01227 280617

4th December
Arts Centre, Norwich
Tickets

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The Charango, a Peculiar Instrument

Charango
Charango

One of the most popular Andean musical instruments is a small guitar with five double strings that looks like a Spanish bandurria. If looked at from the front, there is nothing special, but when you turn it around, it is surprising. Its resonator, which is more or less rounded, is not made out of wood. It’s the shell of an animal!

The fact is that the resonator of this mini-guitar is made out of the outer skeleton of a small mammal, the armadillo, which is also known as tatú, atatou, quirquincho, querú, cabasu, piche, mulita, toche, mataca… These are names that are sometimes also applied to the instrument.

There are 20 or 21 species of armadillos (biologists cannot agree on how to classify them), and all of them live in the South American pampas and other plains areas, and as far north as the southern part of North America (very few of them are found in the jungles).

The uniqueness of the armadillo lies in the fact that, despite being a mammal, instead of having its body covered with hair, it is covered by a protective shell or armor. The word armadillo comes from the Spanish word armado, which means armored. This armor, articulated to allow for movement, is composed of two large shields. One covers the shoulders and the other covers the back, separated by a series of transverse armed bands that vary according to the species (from 3 to 13). Another frontal shield protects the head.

The tail and the outer part of the limbs are also covered by articulated plates, although there are some species, like the tatús de rabo molle (from the Cabassosus class), that have an exposed tail.

armadillo
armadillo

When the animal is attacked, it rolls itself, like hedgehogs do, and becomes practically invulnerable. The one known as mataco (Tolypeutes matacus), forms a sphere so perfect that in some places it is know as bolita (little ball in Spanish), a name that is also given to the charango.

It should be noted that some armadillos, as good mammals, do have long disperse hairs, such as the one called peludo (hairy in Spanish or Chaetophractus villosus).

It is the hard shell that is used to make the resonator for the charango, specifically the one that covers the body, without the head, limbs and tail, and that is why the instrument is rounded. Nevertheless, not all charangos are made using armadillo shields. Some are made from cedar or chestnut wood. In that case, the resonator is usually flat. The cover is normally made out of pine or fir.

Inspired by Spanish guitars carried by the colonists, some of the first charangos appeared in the 18th century. The charango has become one of the most popular instruments in the Andean regions of Bolivia, Peru and northern Argentina.

The Quéchua and Aimara country folk of Peru and Bolivia prefer the charango with a flat wooden resonator and metal strings. The players from northern Argentina and Lake Titicaca region prefer the armadillo charangos, also with metallic strings. This version of the charango is also used in urban areas, although the strings are usually made out of nylon, giving it a deeper and clearer bass sound.

Sources: Charango description based on the article The Charango, a Peculiar Instrument by Marta Vigo, biologist. Translated by Angel Romero. Courtesy of Arca de Música.

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Spellbinding Sounds from the North

Wardruna – Runaljod – Ragnarok (By Norse Music, 2016)

The music of Wardruna takes you to an intriguing era in the Nordic regions of Europe. On Runaljod – Ragnarok, the Norwegian musicians combine early Scandinavian musical instruments with contemporary sounds. It’s a fascinating sound that incorporates trance-like drones, mesmerizing chants, distant horns, and rhythms that give you an image of cadenced rowing.

This album is the third part of a trilogy of recordings that interpreted the 24 olden Nordic runes. The first two segments of the trilogy were Runaljod – gap var Ginnunga (2009) and Runaljod – Yggdrasil (2013).

The artist behind the project is multi-instrumentalist, composer and songwriter Einar Selvik, who used to play drums in heavy metal bands. He’s developed the Wardruna hybrid sound that integrates acoustic world music, trance electronics and a Dead Can Dance-sensibility. Selvik uses a wide range of musical instruments; the most captivating are the rare kraviklyra (a medieval lyre, considered one of the oldest instruments in Norway), taglharpe (a Viking-era horse hair bowed harp), goat horns, birchbark lures (a long wooden horn tied with birch bark), and deer-hide frame drums. Selvik’s music was used in the popular Vikings TV series.

 

Wardruna - Photo by Ole J Brye
Wardruna – Photo by Ole J Brye

 

Although there is continuity between the chapters of the trilogy, Runaljod – Ragnarok introduces additional elements such as bronze lures, guest performances by Einar’s children and the Skarvebarna children’s choir.

 

Wardruna's Einar Selvik and Lindy-Fay Hella - Photo by Espen Winther
Wardruna’s Einar Selvik and Lindy-Fay Hella – Photo by Espen Winther

 

Runaljod – Ragnarok was composed, recorded and produced by Einar Selvik at his Fimbulljóð studio. The lineup includes Einar Selvik on vocals, taglharpe, kraviklyra, goat horn, tongue horn, bronze lure, flutes, drums, percussion and electronics; Lindy-Fay Hella on vocals; Eilif Gundersen on bronze lure, birchbark lure, goat horn, willow flute and ice percussion; Arne Sandvoll on vocals; HC Dalgaard on vocals; Kjell Braaten on vocals; Ask Einarson Nybro and Tuva J. Einarsdatter Nybro on vocals; and the Skarvebarna Children’s Choir conducted by Ingjerd Almås Arnfinset.

 

 

Selvik will present the Runaljod trilogy workshop titled “The Thoughts and Tools Behind Wardruna” presented by Scandinavia House and Gramercy Theatre on December 9-10.

 

 

Runaljod – Ragnarok is a spellbinding recording by one of the most talented artists in the Norwegian music scene.

Buy Runaljod – Ragnarok in the Americas

Buy Runaljod – Ragnarok in Europe

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