Category Archives: General News

Dominican Merengue Inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

merengue musicians - Photo courtesy of Ministerio de Cultura de República Dominicana
merengue musicians – Photo courtesy of Ministerio de Cultura de República Dominicana

Today, November 30, 2016, UNESCO announced that Dominican merengue music and dance was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

The merengue is considered part of the national identity of the Dominican Republic. It is present in people’s daily lives – from their education to social gatherings and celebrations, and even political campaigning.

In 2005, merengue was recognized by presidential decree with November 26 declared National Merengue Day. Merengue festivals are held in cities in the Dominican Republic like Santo Domingo and Puerto Plata every year.

Danced in couples, flirtatious gestures are used as participants move in circles to the rhythm of music played on instruments such as the accordion, drum and saxophone. It is a dance that is usually introduced to learners at an early age.

Knowledge and skills on the practice are transmitted through observation, participation and imitation. The merengue attracts people of different social classes, which helps to promote respect and coexistence among individuals, groups and communities.

The north of the country is considered to be the cradle of merengue with the area of influence extending to Puerto Rico, the United States of America and the Caribbean region.

The merengue is also popular in other Latin American countries such as Venezuela and Colombia where variations have emerged, and countries in Central America.

Share

World Music Artists in Support of ‘Kids Against Malaria’ Project

Acclaimed musicians Martín Perna (Antibalas, Ocote Soul Sounds), Gangbe Brass, several members of Antibalas, and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador Angélique Kidjo have participated in the recording of a song to support the Kids Against Malaria initiative. The message of the song is pretty basic: sleep under an insecticide treated mosquito net and get to a medical provider as soon as you’re feeling sick.

The Kids Against Malaria effort started with a song written by teacher Sim D’Souza and his students at an arts and music elementary school in Whydah (Oidah), Benin, called CIAMO. The song reached musician and filmmaker Jon Fine, who produced the song by enlisting the support of renowned Afrobeat and world music artists.

The video is available here:

trailer-kids-against-malaria-english/

The “Kids Against Malaria” project was launched. It’s a multi-language musical project focusing on malaria treatment and prevention. With the international team, the producers filmed and recorded in New York City and Benin with support from the United States Embassy in Benin, UNICEF, The President’s Malaria Initiative, USAID, Peace Corps, the CDC, The UN Foundation and Harvard University.

Malaria is still widespread in much of the world. About 3.2 billion people – nearly half the planet’s population – are at risk. The disease, spread by the bite of female mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium parasites, is generally deadly for pregnant women and children under the age of five. It’s estimated that 1,200 children a day are dying from malaria around the world. Malaria is both preventable and curable.

All the proceeds from downloads, music videos, ringtones, educational videos, and social media initiatives, earned from the song will benefit CIAMO School of Music (for arts education), The UN Foundation’s Nothing But Nets campaign (to purchase nets) and Harvard University’s Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe initiative (for Malaria research).

For more on information about the Kids Against Malaria project, visit Kidsagainstmalaria.com.

Share

British Publication fRoots Announces The 31st Annual fRoots Critics Poll 2016 Nominees

froots_poll_2016

British magazine fRoots has announced the Album of the Year nominees in the areas of what they describe as folk, roots and world music. The poll participants include hundreds of writers, broadcasters and activists from the UK and abroad.

Nominees for New Album Of 2016 (listed alphabetically)

Aziza Brahim – Abbar El Hamada (Glitterbeat)
Josienne Clarke & Ben Walker – Overnight (Rough Trade)
Shirley Collins – Lodestar (Domino)
The Furrow Collective – Wild Hog (Hudson)
The Gloaming – 2 (Real World)
Leyla McCalla – A Day For The Hunter, A Day For The Prey (Jazz Village)
Jim Moray – Upcetera (NIAG)
Maarja Nuut – Une Meeles (Maarja Nuut)
Refugees For Refugees – Amerli (Muziekpublique)
Kristi Stassinopoulou & Stathis Kalyviotis – Nyn (Riverboat)

Nominees for Reissue/Compilation Album Of 2016 (listed alphabetically)

Bitori – Legend Of Funana – The Forbidden Music Of The Cape Verde Islands (Analog Africa)
Sandy Denny – I’ve Always Kept A Unicorn (Island)
Various Artists – Khmer Rouge Survivors – They Will Kill You If You Cry (Glitterbeat)
Various Artists – Music Of Morocco From The Library Of Congress, Recorded By Paul Bowles 1959 (Dust To Digital)
Various Artists – Space Echo – The Mystery Behind The Cosmic Sound Of Cabo Verde Finally Revealed (Analog Africa)
Various Artists – Urgent Jumping! (Stern’s)

This year’s winners, including the winner of Best Packaged Album Of 2016, will be exclusively revealed by BBC Radio 3 during their World On 3 broadcast from 11 pm on Friday, November 25th, presented by Kathryn Tickell, and in the Jan/Feb 2017 double issue of fRoots magazine from December 6th.

Share

Tinariwen Release Advance of ‘Sastanàqqàm’, the first single from forthcoming new album Elwan

Tinariwen - Photo by Thomas Dorn
Tinariwen – Photo by Thomas Dorn

Malian desert blues band Tinariwen has released a video advance of ‘Sastanàqqàm,’ the first single from the band’s upcoming new album, Elwan, scheduled for release released on February 10th 2017 on Wedge.

In 2014, Tinariwen stopped at Rancho de la Luna studios in the desert of California’s Joshua Tree National Park. Guitarist Matt Sweeny, singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Kurt Vile, musician and vocalist Alan Johannes recorded sessions with the Malian band, engineered by Andrew Schepps, who has worked with the Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Johnny Cash, and Jay Z.

Two years later in M’Hamid El Ghizlane, an oasis in southern Morocco, near the Algerian frontier, Tinariwen set up their tents to record, accompanied by the local musical youth and a Ganga ensemble of Gnawa musicians.

Buy Elwan

Share

WOMEX 2016 Opened Yesterday in Santiago de Compostela with a Tribute to Spanish Music

Carmen Paris at WOMEX 2016 opening ceremony - Photo by Van Nieuwland
Carmen Paris at WOMEX 2016 opening ceremony – Photo by Van Nieuwland

World music expo, WOMEX, opened yesterday in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. The trade fair this year includes 291 booths from companies around the world.

The official opening ceremony took place at the filled-to-capacity Auditorio de Galicia. The concert revolved around the theme of ‘Iberians – Music Tapas Menu’, featuring musical appetizers from around Spain’s regions, including Aragon, Catalonia, the Basque Country and the host region Galicia. The performances were directed by Galician musician and producer Pedro Pascual.

Five acts were featured: Carmen París (Aragon), Cuarteto Caramuxo (Galicia), Kepa Junkera (Basque Country), Maria Arnal & Marcel Bagés (Catalonia), and Talabarte (Galicia).

The recently re-elected President of Galicia, Alberto Núñez Feijóo said: “Hosting WOMEX for the second time in three years is a privilege that only the most distinguished cities can enjoy, another opportunity for them to introduce themselves to Europe and to let Europe and the world likewise introduce themselves in those cities“.

The musical discoveries of the Iberian Peninsula, including Galicia, will continue with the Atlantic Connections stage as a part of the WOMEX Showcase Festival running throughout the next three nights in the ancient town of Santiago de Compostela. Overall, the concert program includes more than 60 acts comprising nearly 300 performing artists on 7 stages from 43 countries, as well as the WOMEX Film Nights and daytime screenings.

The WOMEX Awards will take place on Sunday, with Calypso Rose receiving the Artist Award.

More at www.womex.com

Share

Mundial Montreal Announces 2016 Program

Mundial Montreal world music market, a showcase and conference held in Montreal, revealed the Mundial Montreal “Music Without Borders” 2016 program.

The festival will open with the folk-inspired, contemporary sounds of the South Korean band Coreyah. Other international artists include Trad.Attack!, 9Bach, Frigg, and Ellika, Solo & Rafael.

The Aboriginal Sounds Series will showcase Canadian acts IsKwé, Nick Sherman, Logan Staats, The Jerry Cans, and Moe Clark.

Official Showcase Selection – List of artists

Afrotronix
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

April Verch Band
Pembroke, Ontario, Canada

Coreyah
Seoul, Korea

David Greely
Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, USA

Frigg
Helsinki, Finland

Iskwé
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

La Yegros
Montpellier, France

Las Cafeteras
Los Angeles, California, USA

Lenka Lichtenberg & Fray
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Logan Staats
Brantford Six Nations, Ontario, Canada

Miguel de Armas Quarter
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Moe Clark
Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Moody Amiri
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Nick Sherman
Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

NIYAZ
Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Paulo Ramos
Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Poirier Migration Soundsystem
Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Proyecto Iré
Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Sonido Pesao
Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Stella Gonis
Fort de France, Martinique

The Jerry Cans
Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada

TRAD.ATTACK!
Tallinn, Estonia

Villalobos Brothers
New York, USA

Wesli
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Zuze
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Opening Night presented by KAMS 15 Nov – 9:00 p.m. – Cabaret Lion d’Or

Wednesday Night Music Without Borders Showcase 16 Nov – 8:30 p.m. – Café/Petit Campus

Thursday Back And Forth Night 17 Nov – 8:00 p.m. – Divan Orange/Club Balattou

Niyaz – The Fourth Light Project 18 Nov – 8:00 p.m. – Theatre Outremont

La Yegros/Las Cafeteras presented by Nuits d’Afrique 18 Nov – 9 p.m. – Le National

Poirier Migration Sound System 18 Nov – 10:00 p.m. – Club Soda

Free Afternoon Showcases
16 Nov – 3:30 p.m. – Café/Petit Campus
17 Nov – 3:30 p.m. – Divan Orange
18 Nov – 2:30 p.m. – St. John the Evangelist (Red Roof)

After party Sonora Mundial! – 19 Nov – 9:00 p.m. – Groove Nation

Share

The International Songwriting Competition Seeking World Music Acts

The International Songwriting Competition (ISC) is seeking world music talent for the current edition of the contest. The extended deadline is November 4th, 2016.

The ISC prizes include over $150,000 in cash and merchandise, including a $25,000 cash Grand Prize and a scholarship to Berklee College of Music’s Summer Performance Program for the winner of the Teen category.

The submissions are reviewed by a high profile panel of artist and industry judges. The judges in this year’s competition include: Salif Keita; Ziggy Marley; Afro Celt Sound System; Femi Kuti; Tom Waits; Chris Cornell; Lorde; Bastille; Hardwell; Kaskade; Martie Maguire (Dixie Chicks/Court Yard Hounds); Rickie Lee Jones; India Arie; Joy Williams; Joe Bonamassa; Fat Joe; Ray Benson (Asleep At The Wheel); Far East Movement; Jordan Feliz; Art Alexis (Everclear); Matt Maher; Devo; Marianna Vega; and others.

Go to www.songwritingcompetition.com/ to enter

headline photo: Maurizio Giannone and Roberto Giannone, winners last year

Share

WOMEX 2017 to Be Held in Poland

WOMEX organizers announced today that the World Music Expo will be held in Katowice, in the region of Silesia, in southern Poland. The annual conference is the largest gathering of world music professionals and will take place October 25–29, 2017.

Silesia is a region with its very specific cultural heritage and is located in the heart of Central and Eastern Europe, neighboring the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Three international airports are near Katowice: Katowice Pyrzowice, Krakow, and Ostrava. According to WOMEX organizers, moderate costs in Katowice promise a pleasant stay for WOMEX delegates.

We are delighted to bring WOMEX into this European region and find new friends there. We believe WOMEX will once again add its part to a positive movement over there: The city of Katowice is an upcoming creative location, recently undergoing a post-industrial flowering where the city becomes a green, cultural hub,” says Alexander Walter, WOMEX Director

Katowice is the only Central European city bearing the title of the UNESCO City of Music. Katowice has recently opened a remarkable Cultural Zone with a highly-acclaimed concert hall, the NOSPR that will also be one of the main venues for WOMEX 2017, as well as state-of-the-art International Congress Centre (ICC). Two popular and critically acclaimed festivals are part of the city’s cultural landscape.

Throughout Poland cultural and world music festivals; folk, jazz, Jewish culture are celebrated and the Polish presence at WOMEX has been growing steadily in the last years. The local partner for WOMEX 2017 in Katowice will be the Polish ICP Group and its subdivision “Poland Concept.” WOMEX 2017 will be produced with the support of the City of Katowice.

More about WOMEX: www.womex.com

Share

Fusion without confusion – how world music bands blend multiple influences

The 19th Rainforest World Music Festival (RWMF) in Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia), regarded as one of the Top 25 music festivals by Songlines magazine, was once again a three-day delight of afternoon workshops, evening performances and interactive discussion between media and musicians each morning.

See also my articles on the media meets at previous RWMF editions: How world music bands build collective vision, promote indigenous culture and yet adapt to changing times (2015), World music bands address the importance of heritage, messages and innovation (2014) and World music bands address their role in social change, cultural preservation and creativity (2013).

The 2016 lineup featured 17 international and 8 Malaysian groups. The overseas bands included Auli (Latvia), Broukar (Syria), Derek Gripper (South Africa), Dol Arastra Bengkulu (Indonesia), Dya Singh (Australia/Malaysia), Krar Collective (Ethiopia), Lan Dieu Viet (Vietnam), Naygayiw Gigi (Australia), Nukariik (Canada), Pat Thomas & Kwashibu Area Band (Ghana), Shanren (China), Stelios Petrakis Quartet (Greece), Teada (Ireland), Vassvik (Norway), Violons Barbares (Bulgaria, Mongolia, France), and Vocal Sampling (Cuba).  The Malaysian lineup consisted of Alena Murang, Gendang Melayu Sri Buana, Mathew Ngau, Sape’ Sarawak, The Thunder Beats of Nanyang Wushu Drums, Unique Arts Academy, and 1Drum.

During media interactions over three days, and in separate interviews, members of these 25 bands described their careers, instruments, collaborations, socio-political contexts and musical messages – along with their sense of humor.

The ‘4Es’ – Entertainment, Empathy, Education, Empowerment

I asked the bands how they mix entertainment in their music along with serious messages that build empathy for social causes and educate audiences about different cultures.

In Inuit culture, throat singing is a form of entertainment as well as culture,” explained Kathy and Karin Kettler of Inuit duo Nukariik from Canada. “We are the indigenous Sami people. Our joik music comes from ritual activity. It is serious and fun at the same time,” agreed Torgeir Vassvik from northern Norway.

Shanren
Shanren

In our case, entertainment and message are wrapped in one. In the Yunnan region, music, dance and alcohol are integrated,” joked the members of folk-rock band Shanren from China. The region has 26 ethnic groups with very diverse cultures. “We play rock as well as world music. There is a risk of our local music dying out,” they said.

I want to be the voice of the poor people in my country and speak for them,” said Sambaton Dorvil, lead singer of Haitian voodoo band Chouk Bwa Libete.

Indonesian percussion troupe Dol Arastra Bengkulu said they play in rituals celebrating heroism, but also teach young people to play anywhere. Inter-ethnic group Violons Barbares described how they perform in festivals, concert halls, and clubs, as well as immigrant community centers and events in their new countries.

Our music is used in a documentary, and will also be in a game on AppleTV,” said the bagpipe and drum music group Auli from Latvia.

In addition to performances, sape player Alena Murang from Sarawak speaks at events such as TEDx KL, plays on TV, and conducts workshops in schools in Western Malaysia where the sape is not very well known as an indigenous instrument.

Our tradition is strong – and strict! I feel happiest when I get respect from my local tradition and the international community,” said Stelios Petrakis, founder of the Greek band Stelios Petrakis Quartet. “We get requests even at 5 in the morning after all-night performances,” he joked.

In some traditional music communities, creativity and deviation are not respected. I don’t see it as a compromise, I see it as a challenge and opportunity to create new music for new audiences,” Petrakis said.

When we do a capella, we have more freedom and variation,” said Vocal Sampling, a Latin music a capella group from Cuba.

An interesting category of world music artists consists of those who have immigrated to other countries, or are children of immigrants, or are of mixed parentage. Issues of tradition and creative freedom play out differently in their case.

We play collaborative music so we are free from the ‘jail’ of some strict traditions,” explained the members of Violons Barbares, a trio with musicians from Mongolia, Bulgaria and France.

Sikh hymn singer Dya Singh is of Indian origin and grew up in Malaysia – he now lives in Australia and performs along with a percussionist from Nepal. “We are truly global citizens,” said Dya Singh, and he showcased it brilliantly during a jam session where he blended a Sufi chant with Latin a capella beats.

Music and dance give us deep roots. A lot of younger generations are washing away the messages from culture,” cautioned his daughter Gimel, herself a performer at RWMF.

Rainforest World Music Festival, press conference Day 2 - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Rainforest World Music Festival, press conference Day 2 – Photo by Madanmohan Rao

Vision, mission

Many of the bands described their vision of the world and what kind of role they see in it. “The most important contribution of world music is to help address and solve problems,” said Dya Singh. This can also be part of the role of world music festivals. “The tree-planting ceremony in the mangrove wetlands at RWMF sends out a good message about the environment,” he added.

Musicians can help raise social awareness about anything happening anywhere in the world. Musicians have to be positive and help make the world a better place,” agreed Pat Thomas of Ghana.

The role of a musician is to keep out of politics – but have a strong say about issues like the environment. Corruption is more intricate, it has always been there, it can be hard for musicians to pick one party against another,” Dya Singh explained.

The world is a complex place for anyone to understand,” agreed Vassvik of Norway. “Music is what comes out when we don’t have more words to express or explain things; it goes deeper,” he said.

Missionaries used to ban throat singing in Canada (‘kill the Indian in the child’); we preserve it now and teach it,” said Kathy and Karin Kettler of Nukariik. “We will continue to promote Sabah tradition, the music will not stop!” said Band Girls LKNS from Malaysia.

I sometimes wonder how much fossil fuel we burn when we travel around the world playing at festivals!” joked guitarist Derek Gripper of South Africa, commenting on the environmental impact of travel.

Musicians have to first remind us of what it means to be human, find commonalities and celebrate diversity,” he said. “Even if music can’t ‘achieve’ anything, we can have fun!” he quipped.

For endangered cultures, even the act of performance is a statement, according to Naygayiw Gigi, the dance troupe from Queensland, Australia, who promote the clan cultures from the Torres Strait region.

The Rainforest World Music Festival has helped preserve and promote local culture also,” said Jun Lin, Artistic Director, RWMF. It has instilled pride in Sarawak instruments like sape and built connections to promote them overseas as well. Given the international turmoil, the festival has also increased awareness and empathy about refugees, eg. by inviting the band Broukar whose members are Syrian refugees.

Careers

An interesting and humorous discussion revolved around what the artists were doing before they embarked on their musical careers, and what part-time jobs some of them have to fund their musical interests.

I used to be a management consultant and wasn’t happy! I decided I had to get out of the rat race and do what I could do for my culture and what I was happy doing,” said Alena Murang of Sarawak.

I was a pharmacist – it was nice to help people but the magic was in music!” said kanun player Taoufik Mirkhan of Broukar from Syria. “I have a pharmacist certificate and hung it up on the wall to please my mother – now I go out and play music! I also teach music, which is very important for the next generation,” he added.

I have a day job in product engineering, but folk music is my love,” said lead member Mikus Čavarts of Auli from Latvia. “In some day jobs also you don’t make much money – so just do what you love and play music!” he advised.

I studied to be a lawyer, and then gave my diploma to my mother. But it’s easy now for me to read my contracts!” joked Stelios Petrakis. “I also made instruments, I had two lives! Then I decided to make my life more crazy and do only music,” he added.

Rainforest World Music Festival, press conference Day 3 - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Rainforest World Music Festival, press conference Day 3 – Photo by Madanmohan Rao

Fusion without confusion

I also asked the bands how they are able to create fusion without confusion – or blend different elements and forms of music in their performances without losing coherence.

There always has been fusion and confusion in music, joked Derek Gripper. Over the years, traveling musicians have introduced new elements into traditional music, eg. jugalbandi from India in some of the kora music of Africa.

There are different types of fusion, based on form, instrument and performance. “We play traditional music on contemporary instruments as well,” said Band Girls LKNS from Malaysia.

We have collaborated with hip-hop artists and even rock stars,” said Temesgen Zelekeis from the Ethiopian band Krar Collective. “We do club gigs as well, not just traditional sets. Modern interpretation is not a restriction based on elements of culture,” he said.

Our group has brought in outside influences from disco, jazz and so on over the decades; this also helps reach larger audiences,” said Pat Thomas from Ghana.

Technology continues to accelerate the interaction between different types of music. “There has been a massive change in the music of the world over the last 100 years. Flows between music around the world have always been there – it’s much faster now,” said Derek Gripper.

Musicians need to keep diversity alive without becoming homogeneous,” he cautioned. For example, some kora players are tuning their instruments to the piano – that could lead to the loss of the kora’s individuality.

Festivals like RWMF are also important because musicians from one country can play with those of other countries thanks to the collaborative workshop format and media discussions. Unfortunately, many emerging economies do not have as many festivals with as much international exposure and mixing as in the case of Western festivals.

Some musicians expressed concern about youth in their countries being more influenced by rock, hip-hop and EDM than local traditions. “Every new generation wants new music also, take it like it is,” advised Pat Thomas.

This year I will focus on preserving our old traditions with young musicians,” said Mathew Ngau of Sarawak. Some old taboos are now being tackled as well; it used to be a taboo for women to play the sape, but now girls are playing it.

There were taboos on women playing didgeridoo also, but that should not be the case anymore,” added Dya Singh.

Traditional instruments and dances

The artists also described some of the traditional instruments they brought along – and even made themselves, in some cases. Matthew Ngau said he makes his own sape, and has developed knowledge of local wood types, some of which are rare now because of deforestation. String materials like creepers are sometimes substituted with steel. Stelios Petrakis from Crete also makes the instruments for his band.

We have modified some traditional instruments to make them easier for stage performances and travel,” said members of the group Shanren from China.

The krar is over a thousand years old as an instrument, and we have also modified it in electric style now,” said Temesgen Zelekeis of the Krar Collective.

Haitian band Chouk Bwa Libète uses drums from Benin and Congo. Other traditional instruments featured were the Sabah gong, thappu frame drum from India, Vietnamese dan bau monochord and trung bamboo xylophone, Middle Eastern kanun, and Bulgarian gaduka (three-string violin).

We brought along our throats!” joked the throat singers of Nukariik, a sentiment strongly echoed by Cuban a cappella band Vocal Sampling!

Respect the instrument and the craftsman,” said Dya Singh, strongly disapproving of breaking of instruments by some rock bands. “My flutist sleeps with his flutes if his wife is not around! My tabla player uses his blanket to keep the tabla warm on cold nights, rather than for himself. Smashing musical instruments is sacrilege. My father once slapped me in public because I stepped over an instrument,” he explained.

Traditional dances were also featured in some of the performances, such as joget (Malaysia) and dervish (Syria); the dancers of (Aus) wore dazzling costumes as well. Everyone asks our Dervish Dancer how he does not get dizzy even after 15 minutes of twirling!” joked Broukar.

The Mongolian throat-singing also surprises many new audiences, as well as the unusual combinations of three nationalities in the group Violons Barbares (Mongolia, Bulgaria, and France).

I interpret the ‘classical’ music of Africa, such as the kora stars,” said South African guitarist Derek Gripper, who has released a series of award-winning albums.

We are losing our culture rapidly, it is important to pass on our language, music and dance,” said Naygayiw Gigi. “Australia has two indigenous peoples: near the centre and near the coast. We need to explain this to Australians as well!” they joked.

Pat Thomas blends traditional instruments like the cowbell along with the trumpet in their highlife music. “We turn emotions around – ‘happy’ music about sadness, ‘sad’ music about happiness!” he joked.

Irish traditional folk music plays a huge part in our lives, particularly in rural areas. Freedom, fun and entertainment have been a part of our music – and recently in bars and pubs too,” said fiddler ace Oisín Mac Diarmada of Irish band Teada.

The meaning of success

I asked the bands how they defined ‘success’ for themselves as musicians, eg. in terms of more albums, concerts, money, or pursuit of an inner journey.

Success is keeping our music group together over many years, while also evolving and collaborating with others,” said Oisín Mac Diarmada Teada; their band has been together for 15 years.

Success is to keep playing!” said Abhisheg M. of Unique Arts Academy of Malaysia. Many musicians start playing at very young ages, when they may not have clear definitions of what success could be. “Music is for my inner peace; success is remaining happy, that is good enough,” Abhisheg added.

Fame and recognition are important for us because it inspires our next generation. It is success if our children appreciate our culture and dance – not just hip-hop,” said members of Naygayiw Gigi.

Share

Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil Headliners at the Opening Ceremony of Rio Olympics

Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil -  Photo by Marcos Hermes
Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil – Photo by Marcos Hermes

Acclaimed Brazilian singers, songwriters, and guitarists Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil are set to perform at the Opening Ceremony of the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro at the Maracanã Stadium today, Friday, August 5. The ceremony will be broadcast around the world and can be seen in the United States on NBC starting at 7:30 p.m. ET and in Canada on the CBC starting at 7:00 p.m. ET. The Rio 2016 Opening Ceremony is expected to last about three hours, culminating with the lighting of the Olympic Pyre.

Nonesuch Records released earlier this year Dois Amigos, Um Século de Música: Multishow Live, a live 2-disc recording from the award winning Veloso and Gil. Dois Amigos celebrates a lifelong friendship over the half-century careers of two artists who have broken cultural, social, and political barriers through music.

Caetano Veloso & Gilberto Gil - Dois Amigos, Um Século de Música: Multishow Live
Caetano Veloso & Gilberto Gil – Dois Amigos, Um Século de Música: Multishow Live

Dois Amigos, Um Século de Música: Multishow Live was recorded for television during a concert in Brazil last year, in the middle of the Dois Amigos tour.

Share