Category Archives: Concert reviews

The Thirtieth Anniversary of the Klezmatics in Warsaw

Yiddish culture as it existed in Eastern Europe can never be revived as it was. Luckily, enough of the culture has been preserved in books, on recordings and by older mentors to have allowed us to pick up the thread and be a part of our tradition, even if it has evolved into something new and different.” – Lorin Sklamberg


The Klezmatics - Photo by Paulina Tendera
The Klezmatics – Photo by Paulina Tendera


On September 4, at an outdoor performance at Grzybowski Square in Warsaw, the Klezmatics celebrated their thirtieth anniversary. The fruits of the group’s activity include eleven discs (released from 1989 to 2011), and, among other awards, a Grammy in the category of World Music. The crowd was large, the artists gave us a demonstration of the best music, and the weather was surprising. The concert took place as part of the 13th Singer’s Warsaw Festival.


The Klezmatics - Photo by Paulina Tendera
The Klezmatics – Photo by Paulina Tendera


The Klezmatics gave a concert which can be summarized briefly as an expression of joyful thanksgiving: they captivated the audience, bewitching it with their singing, passion, and sound. The show will remain in our memory as a souvenir of holiday colors and sounds.

In the Klezmatics’ music, old Yiddish melodies come back to life, mingled with the sounds of contemporary musical genres such as rock, jazz, gospel and ethno/folk. In this music, the hybrid of styles and genres serves to affirm that Yiddish music is still part of living tradition and culture. The artists do not skimp on delighting our senses, reaching on stage for more than a dozen different instruments, both traditional and modern, and singing in several languages.


The Klezmatics - Photo by Paulina Tendera
The Klezmatics – Photo by Paulina Tendera


Today, the Klezmatics are already Jewish music classics. They create important arrangements and interpretations of traditional Yiddish songs, changing today’s view of the Jewish and klezmer culture of Eastern Europe. Thus, in a strange way, this music connects longing and nostalgia with a passion for life, love, and joy.

For this work, thanks and great appreciation are due to Lorin Sklamberg (lead vocals, accordion, guitar, piano), Frank London (trumpet, keyboards, vocals), Lisa Gutkin (violin, vocals), Matt Darriau (kaval, clarinet, saxophone, vocals), Paul Morrissett (bass, tsimbl, vocals), and Richie Barshay (percussion instruments).


Mehmet Polat Trio Play Songs of Connection

Lincoln Center’s David Rubenstein Atrium is a cool and welcome relief from the 85F heat of Manhattan. The room is crowded with more than a hundred people waiting for the Mehmet Polat Trio to take the stage. It is a packed house with a line out the door of 30 people waiting to get in, a turn-away crowd. Their performance is part of a weekly free concert series coordinated by Lincoln Center that runs year long.

The trio has an oud player Mehmet Polat, a ngoni player Victor Sams, and a ney player Pelin Başar. They are here at the outset of an almost month long tour across America. Mehmet introduces himself and the trio, he invites the audience to listen, “I am looking for a musical connection from heart to heart. I invite you to open your heart and let the music come through you.”

The performance starts with Polat’s gentle and languorous solo on the oud – a pear-shaped wooden instrument with strings that sounds like a lute. Mehmet is from Turkey, his family are from an Alevi Sufi musical tradition. But he has studied various musical styles, including traditional African, Indian, Persian music, and modern jazz. His sound is spare, folk-like, meditative. There are no electronic keyboards here or drum fills.

A silence opens up in the audience. People are rapt in attention, entranced. Mehmet seated center is joined in play by the ney player. The ney is a long and ancient flute. The ngoni, a long-stringed instrument, joins in. And the flute melody weaves in an out the accompanying strings of the other two instruments. There is a grace about this trio, nothing is rushed, time slows down. The audience is invited to relax and to contemplate.

The ngoni player initiates the second song, using his fingers in staccato taps at the base of his instrument. Victor Sams has a beautiful smile that radiates out to the audience. There is a happiness and versatility in his playing: the ngoni is magically transformed into a drum, then back to a stringed instrument, then again to a drum.

Mehmet Polat Trio
Mehmet Polat Trio

The ngoni and oud begin a conversation, shadowing each other’s sound. The two performers nod to each other as they sit side by side. The notes move round and round one another in call and response. One leads with a few notes and the other answers with a few more. Indeed, Mehmet has confirmed that this dialogue is vital for him, “The conversation is intended. I am interested in creating connections between different cultures and continents. I want to explore the common language, but also to look at how two different musical languages may correlate or vibrate together.”

The music is not afraid to breathe, to pause, and to create space in this large atrium. This sense of spaciousness is perhaps one of the trio’s greatest strengths. As the performance continues, Mehmet begins to sing. With his eyes closed, you sense his earnestness, his sincerity. He is humble, yet assured in his musicianship. The song includes some words of Fuzuli, who was a Sufi poet from Azerbaijan. The ney shadows the vocal notes. There is a cyclical sense to the melody, reminiscent of an Indian raga. The audience is pulled in, caught up in the compelling, lulling sound. The audience is transported on a journey of wonder and longing.

For more information about Mehmet Polat Trio’s tour, please visit:


Rainforest World Music Festival 2016: 25 bands covering all 5 continents!

The annual Rainforest World Music Festival in Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia) is now in its 19th edition, and featured 25 bands from around the planet. The venue is the lush equatorial rainforest of the Sarawak Cultural Village – located between Mount Santubong and the South China Sea.

The 2016 lineup featured 17 international and 8 Malaysian groups. The overseas bands included Auli (Latvia), Broukar (Syria), Derek Gripper (South Africa), Dol Arastra Bengkulu (Indonesia), Dya Singh (Australia/Malaysia), Krar Collective (Ethiopia), Lan Dieu Viet (Vietnam), Naygayiw Gigi (Australia), Nukariik (Canada), Pat Thomas & Kwashibu Area Band (Ghana), Shanren (China), Stelios Petrakis Quartet (Greece), Chouk Bwa Libete (Haiti), Teada (Ireland), Vassvik (Norway), Violons Barbares (Bulgaria, Mongolia, France), and Vocal Sampling (Cuba).  The Malaysian lineup consisted of Alena Murang, Gendang Melayu Sri Buana, Mathew Ngau, Sape’ Sarawak, The Thunder Beats Of Nanyang Wushu Drums, Unique Arts Academy, and 1Drum.

See also my coverage of earlier editions of RWMF: Collaboration, Creativity and Community, and Global Sound, Diversity and Celebration; as well as interviews with some of the performers (eg. Rafly wa Saja, Drew Gonsalves, ShoogleNifty).

Festival previews

Kuching Festival Food Fair.
Kuching Festival Food Fair.


Before the Festival, some of the bands held preview concerts in local pubs, cafes and the Kuching Festival Food Fair. One of the previews was rained out due to a torrential downpour, but I caught the next superb performance by percussion troupe Dol Arastra Bengkulu from Indonesia. They are influenced by the ‘percusi dol’ ritualistic traditions of Sumatra, celebrating acts of heroism.


Dol Arastra Bengkulu - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Dol Arastra Bengkulu – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The musicians carried the thunderous ‘gendang dol’ drums with them as they danced around the stage, occasionally even lying down on their backs while playing them. They alternately formed circles and rows, sometimes even playing on their neighbors’ drums.


The Thunder Beats Of Nanyang Wushu Drums - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
The Thunder Beats Of Nanyang Wushu Drums – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Day One

Each morning of the festival began with a media meet between journalists and musicians; see my earlier articles on artiste insights: Fusion without confusion – how world music bands blend multiple influences (2016), How world music bands build collective vision, promote indigenous culture and yet adapt to changing times (2015), World music bands address the importance of heritage, messages and innovation (2014) and World music bands address their role in social change, cultural preservation and creativity (2013).

The media meet was followed by an afternoon of indoor workshops and performances, starting off with Vietnam and Malaysia. The five members of Lan Dieu Viet are all music teachers at the Vietnam National Academy of Music. Trương Thị Thu Hà played a dazzling solo on the beautiful trung (bamboo xylophone), and Cồ Huy Hùng (moon lute) and Nguyễn Hoàng Anh (bamboo flute) also stood out in the folk performances.


Lan Dieu Viet
Lan Dieu Viet


They were followed by Alena Murang on sape and vocals, performing traditional music of Sarawak in the language of the Kenyah and Kelabit people from Ulu Baram. Murang is one of the few young women to openly perform and teach the sape, an instrument from Borneo that used to be a taboo for women to even touch. She learnt from masters such as Mathew Ngau, and has played overseas and gives talks and lectures on the sape.


Alena Murang - Photo courtesy of Sarawak Tourism Board
Alena Murang – Photo courtesy of Sarawak Tourism Board


Each evening, a drum circle was facilitated by Malaysia’s 1Drum (their slogan is ‘Drum, Cause You Can!’). The outdoor acts at night were held on two adjacent stages set in the picturesque rainforest. Traditional ceremonies to bless the festival were conducted by local cultural groups and musicians.

Sape’ Sarawak is a band drawn from the various Sarawak ethnic groups such as Orang Ulu, Iban, Bidayuh, Melanau, Malay, Chinese and other communities. The 17 players presented age-old tales of ancient warriors and supernatural princesses.

Naygayiw Gigi then wowed the audience with an astonishing array of costumers and ritual dances. The troupe, whose name means ‘Northern Thunder,’ hail from Bamaga, the northernmost town in Queensland, Australia. They played the music of seven clans from the Torres Strait, in the form of stories about celebration as well as defense from other attacking clans.


Naygayiw Gigi - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Naygayiw Gigi – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The focus shifted back to Asia with the Unique Arts Academy, performing music and dance of the South Indian communities in Malaysia. Folk drums such as thappu, kottu, chimta, and ganjira filled the stage, along with harmonium and bass guitar. The group has performed at the International Folklore Festival and World Harvest Festival.


Unique Arts Academy - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Unique Arts Academy – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Acclaimed Irish folk band Teada then took the stage; ace fiddler Oisín Mac Diarmada regaled the audience with his humor along with his fellow musicians on percussion and guitar. “Ireland is so nice a place that all our neighbors invaded us,” they joked. They dedicated a song to the freedom-fighters of Ireland.


Teada - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Teada – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Their high energy set also featured some enthusiastic step-dancing by keyboardist Samantha Harvey, and the audience clapped loudly in appreciation. “Thanks, but your kindness will be forgotten,” the band joked again. Over the past 15 years, Teada has also performed at the Edmonton Folk Festival in Canada and Harare International Festival of the Arts.

The energy picked up several notches with a thunderous performance by Dol Arastra Bengkulu (Indonesia), who had also played a shorter set at the previous day’s preview showcase. The first African band of the festival then took the stage: Krar Collective from Ethiopia. The set had elements of electro-folk and rock, with the talented Temesgen Zelekeis on electric krar, Grum Begashaw on drums, and Genet Assefa on vocals and dance.


Krar Collective - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Krar Collective – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Assefa changed costumes six times during the set! and the audience had a tough time trying to imitate her ‘shoulder dislocating’ dance moves! The band has also collaborated with Baaba Maal and Rokia Traore, and Led Zeppelin’s John Paul Jones.

The night came to a climax with the high-energy bagpipe and drum music group Auļi from Latvia. The band revives Latvia’s earlier bagpipe traditions, and added a terrific percussive layer with some of the biggest ‘tree trunk drums’ in the Baltics. They played danceable tracks from some of their earlier albums, which include the aptly named ‘Etnotranss.’

Day Two

The indoor performances on Day Two were kicked off by Sikh hymn singer Dya Singh, who grew up in Malaysia and is now based in Australia. He has released over 25 CDs, and has performed at dozens of festivals including WOMADelaide, Vancouver Folk Festival, and California World Music Festival. His uplifting spiritual incantations actively involved the audience as well; he was accompanied by Dheeraj Shrestha (tabla) as well as his own daughter Gimel.

The second indoor performance featured solo acoustic guitarist Derek Gripper from South Africa, who has nine albums to his credit. He interpreted a number of kora compositions on his guitar, for which he had earlier received acclaim from classical guitar legend John Williams and kora maestro Toumani Diabate. The audience showed their appreciation by lining up immediately after his performance to buy his CDs and get his autograph.


Derek Gripper - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Derek Gripper – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


An hour of torrential rain got the night performances off to a delayed start, but the show went on; after all, what’s the rainforest festival without some rain? The performances began with Mathew Ngau, master sape player and story teller, who also makes his own range of sape instruments and teaches the young Sarawak generation about their traditions.

The next band was Stelios Petrakis Quartet, performing the lively music of Crete from Greece. Petrakis also makes his own instruments such as the lira and laouto, and the pride and respect he had for his traditions shone through in his performance. The accompanying dances also drew loud applause from the audience.

Naygayiw Gigi from Australia treated the audience to some more brilliant costumes and dances; they were followed by Band Girl LKNS from the Sabah state of Malaysia, who showcased a wide range of traditional local gongs.


Band Girl LKNS - Photo courtesy of Sarawak Tourism Board
Band Girl LKNS – Photo courtesy of Sarawak Tourism Board


One of the most unusual bands at RWMF was Vocal Sampling, a male a capella sextet from Cuba, with a lineup that included Rene Baños Pascual, Pedro Bernard Coto, and Reinaldo Sanler Maseda. If you closed your eyes, you could almost visualize a real Latin band playing with congas, bass, trumpet, trombone and guitar! They have performed with the likes of Peter Gabriel, Bobby McFerrin, Ray Barreto, Celia Cruz, Chick Corea and Gal Costa.


Vocal Sampling - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Vocal Sampling – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The group has played at Couleur Café, WOMAD, Festival de Jazz de Nice, Jazz Festival Istanbul, and World Music Festival Sukiyaki. Their rendition of the rock classic ‘Hotel California’ drew loud applause as well at RWMF.

Another range of instruments then featured on the next stage, with Shanren from China playing high-energy folk-rock music from the Yunnan region. Reggae was also blended into the set as the quartet showcased instruments such as xianzi, qinqin and dabiya (four-stringed plucked instruments) as well as xianggu and sun drum (percussion). They have performed at Barcelona Festival Asia, Canadian Music Week, Midem in Cannes, Turtle Island Festival and Liverpool Sound City.


Shanren - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Shanren – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The perfect closing act for the Saturday night performances was Pat Thomas & Kwashibu Area Band from Ghana. Called the ‘Golden Voice of Africa,’ Pat Thomas filled the stage with a phenomenal range of musicians including multi-instrumentalist Kwame Yeboah (guitar, keyboards) and saxophonist Ben Abarbanel-Wolff. The set blended Ghanaian highlife, afro-beat, afro-pop and even disco – spanning four decades of genres and fusion. The aptly-named ‘I Need More’ was the encore.


 Pat Thomas & Kwashibu Area Band - Photo by Madanmohan Rao

Pat Thomas & Kwashibu Area Band – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Day Three

The indoor performances on Day Three featured some outstanding throat singing from Norway and Canada. Torgeir Vassvik and his trio kicked off the first performance; Vassvik is an artist from Sápmi’s northernmost tip, Gamvik in Norway. The Sami joik and resonant throat singing reflect the diverse textures and climates of the Arctic zone.


Vassvik - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Vassvik – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The second Northern band on stage was Nukariik from Canada. The duo consists of sisters Kathy and Karin Kettler. Their Inuit throat singing and breathing styles, performed while facing each other, were inspired by the birds, animals and seasons of their region; a backdrop of photographs provided stunning visuals as well. “The mosquitoes in the Arctic are much bigger than the Malaysian ones,” Kathy joked.


Nukariik - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Nukariik – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The sisters explained how the alternating scales and close sequencing of tunes lead to complex yet entertaining melodies. They have performed at the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards, and are on the Inuit Throat Singer’s Committee.

The night performances on the last day were kicked off by the youthful band Thunder Beats of Nanyang Wushu Drums, from Sarawak in Malaysia. It included 12 drums representing the 12 months of a year, which are performed for prosperity, fortune and abundance.

The eagerly-anticipated Syrian band Broukar took the stage next (I was fortunate to also catch their performance earlier in July at the Forde Festival in Norway; see my writeup here). They were founded in 2007 in Damascus by Taoufik Mirkhan (kanun), and the musician lineup now includes his sister Hadil Mirkhan (oud) and Modar Salameh (percussion).


Broukar - Photo courtesy of Sarawak Tourism Board
Broukar – Photo courtesy of Sarawak Tourism Board


The kanun has 78 strings, which means 78 minutes of tuning,” joked Taoufik Mirkhan, during one of their earlier afternoon workshops. “We also teach this music to our younger generation so they can keep the culture alive – and hopefully one day perform at festivals like this,” he said, referring to the sad plight of Syrian refugees.

The highlight of their performance was three sets of whirling dervish dance by Ahmad Alkhatib – twice in traditional white Sufi costume and finally in a breathtaking black-and-white dress.

Another high-energy trio then took the stage: Violons Barbares, with members from three countries: Dandarvaanchig Enkhjargal (or Epi, from Mongolia), Dimitar Gougov (Bulgaria) and Fabien Guyot (France). Epi blew the audience away with his deep throat singing and sense of humour, and sizzling work on the morin khoor. The Malaysian expression for ‘thank you’ (terima kasi) spoken in his super-deep voice drew delighted whoops from the audience.


Violons Barbares - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Violons Barbares – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Dimitar Gougov played haunting tunes on the gadulka, and Fabien Guyot was simply magnificent on percussion. The trio played a range of love songs and high-energy tracks (including the Afghan ‘Caravan’), and pushed the frontiers of tradition and cross-boundary fusion.

Gears shifted to the largely percussion band Chouk Bwa Libète, a traditional Haitian Mizik Rasin (roots music) band. The voodoo music featured an astonishingly intricate yet highly danceable array of rhythms and chants, with multiple fades and crescendos. The energy was so infectious that lead vocalist Jean Claude Sambaton Dorvil even seemed to be possessed with a spirit for some time, adding a layer of drama to the performance.


Chouk Bwa Libete - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Chouk Bwa Libete – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Drummers Lakous Badjo, Souvenance and Soukri showed unbelievable energy and variation as they alternated between their instruments. The audience joined in a chorus of ‘Amun Aye’ for the last track, and a rousing conch tone wrapped up the set.

The place slowed down a bit with the traditional joget (Malaysian dance) by the group Gendang Melayu Sri Buana, and picked up once again with Latvian bagpipe-drum band Auli (who had also finished up Day One’s performances).


Auli - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Auli – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


All the bands from the three days of the festival came together on stage for the grand finale, and the audience cheered them on loudly as they took their final bow. The black-and-white twirling cape of Broukar’s dervish dancer Ahmad Alkhatib soaring above the rest of the musicians was a memorable sight. The festivities carried on with a poolside jam at the musicians’ hotel, with samples of Greek, Arabic and Canadian indigenous music!


Rainforest World Music Festival 2016 grand finale - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Rainforest World Music Festival 2016 grand finale – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


I picked up a stack of CDs from the bands over the three days of the festival, which should keep me busy with reviews for the next couple of weeks. We already look forward to the next Rainforest World Music Festival in 2017, which promises to be extra special since it will be the 20th edition!


Performer CDs 1
Performer CDs 1


Performer CDs 1
Performer CDs 1


Sunset in Sarawak - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Sunset in Sarawak – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Headline photo: Dol Arastra Bengkulu


26th Jewish Culture Festival, a Krakow festival of World Music

Libelid - Photo by Michal Ramus
Libelid – Photo by Michal Ramus

The first Jewish Culture Festival was held in Poland in 1988, at which time its main goal was to emphasize the very important role of Jews in the creation of the Polish state, cultural identity, and society. After 28 years, the Festival has become Krakow’s best-known cultural event, as well as one of the most important festivals of contemporary Jewish culture in the world.

Every year, nearly thirty thousand people take part in this event; the ten-day duration of the Festival marks the presence in Krakow’s Kazimierz neighborhood of artists, filmmakers, and musicians from around the world.

The themes of the 26th JCF were the Diaspora and the Sabbath, as symbols of historical and contemporary Jewish identity. The implementation of each edition of the Jewish Culture Festival is supervised by the Festival Office, operating under the auspices of the Association of the Jewish Culture Festival (cf.

Shai Tsabari & The Future_Orchestra featuring Ahuva Ozeri - Photo by Michal Ramus
Shai Tsabari & The Future_Orchestra featuring Ahuva Ozeri – Photo by Michal Ramus

The Jewish Culture Festival has become a permanent and very important part of Krakow’s cultural life, in addition to its significant contribution to the spread of knowledge about Jewish culture and tradition, not only in Poland but internationally. The organizers devote particular attention to the cultural significance of music; this is strongly supported by the Jewish religious tradition, in which oral transmission is particularly important. But Krakow’s Jewish Culture Festival also represents a bold transcendence of the boundaries of tradition, codes, and signs, which, expressed in the language of music, equates to “world music.”

Today, not only in Poland but also throughout Europe, very important voices are being raised on the topic of the cultural integration of multiple, often historically conflicting, religious circles. In terms of politics and, especially, economics, this problem, far from disappearing, is actually (as shown by the events currently taking place in Europe) growing. However, World Music shows another side of cultural dialogue, one referring to spontaneous cognitive and artistic desires. This is shown and proven not only by the numerous festival concerts, but also by academic lectures such as “The Musical Meeting of Judaism and Islam” by Prof. Edwin Seroussi of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. More on this topic, on the example of the musicians of the 26th Jewish Culture Festival, is presented below.

In 2016, Krakow hosted musicians from around the world, with a significant portion coming from Israel but as well from the United States, Hungary, Germany, Russia, and Turkey.

The first day of the Festival opened with an evening session in the rhythm of mizrahi, a genre that combines Arabic, European and African music. Khen Elmaleh and David Pearl, creators of the best mizrahi events in Tel Aviv today, played their sets. The second day of the Festival featured an international evening concert of cantors, “By the Rivers of Babylon …,” with the participation of cantor Benzion Miller, one of the most famous Jewish cantors in the world (from the synagogue of the Jewish Center in Hillside, New York, and from 1981 Temple Beth El, Borough Park, Brooklyn, New York, USA), who, in Poland with Alberto Mizrahi and the Ben Baruch Choir, inaugurated the 8th Jewish Culture Festival in 1998 in the courtyard of Collegium Maius of Jagiellonian University.

Also taking part in this year’s concert was the world-famous lyric tenor cantor Yaakov Lemmer, followed by Avraham Kirshenbaum, lyric tenor and hazzan of the Great Synagogue of Jerusalem, one of the most outstanding heirs of the legacy of the Levites. This concert was marked as well by the participation of the Jerusalem Great Synagogue Choir, one of the best choirs performing liturgical music; of the composer Maestro Eli Jaffe, a member of the Royal Academy of Music in London and honorary conductor of the Prague Symphony Orchestra; and of pianist Menachem Bristowski. A Polish accent was provided by the participation in the concert of Krakow’s city orchestra, Sinfonietta Cracovia (PL).

Lola Marsh - Photo by Michal Ramus
Lola Marsh – Photo by Michal Ramus

The third day of the Festival featured an encounter with Jewish music from Austria-Hungary: Glass House Orchestra is the latest project by Frank London, undertaken on the initiative of the Balassi Institute Hungarian Cultural Center in New York. The group, comprising eight respected musicians from different countries, adopts elements of the extremely complex Jewish musical tradition. The result is – as ensured by the organizers of the Festival – truly cosmic.

Also worthy of our attention are The Brothers Nazaroff. As the Festival organizers write on the event’s website: “In the mid-twentieth century, Yiddish music in America was played mainly in the form of lullabies, elegies and Americanized folk songs. It was OK, but a little boring. In 1954 Nathan ‘Prince’ Nazaroff appeared with the album Jewish Freilach Songs (Freilach means happy in Yiddish) which was boisterous and joyful.”

Nathan ‘Prince’ Nazaroff
Nathan ‘Prince’ Nazaroff

By the end of the 26th Festival of Jewish Culture, numerous chamber, club, traditional music, and outdoor concerts had been held. The festival closed with a concert by Totemo, an Israeli music producer and singer. Her music is a combination of futuristic beats and precise sounds, enriched with melancholy lyrics, in a downtempo rhythm.

Given the scope of our review, we are unable to mention all of the artists participating in this Krakow festival of World Music, so we encourage you to take a look at the following websites:

More information:
More pictures:

Text by Paulina Tendera & Wojciech Rubiś


Forde Festival 2016: World music, human rights and cultural preservation

My summer travels this year took me to the Montreal International Jazz Festival as well as Forde Traditional and World Music Festival. This is my second time in Norway for the festival; see my earlier 2012 interviews with the festival director Hilde Bjørkum and artists Kevin Henderson, Damily, Ellika Frisell, Renata Rosa, Sidi Goma, and Frikar. The performances are spread across 20 stages in large indoor halls, arts centers, outdoor stages and even neighborhood barns.

Established in 1990, the four-day festival has always had an anchor theme, such as aboriginal music, regional showcases or gypsy music. The theme this year was ‘Flight,’ reflecting not just the tragedies of the refugee crisis but also the creative traditions of many of the affected communities.

Pre-festival highlights

At the stunning mountain-top Floyen Restaurant in Bergen, Norwegian musicians Gro Marie Svidal and Irene Tillung performed a melodic set of Hardanger fiddle and accordion music. They shared stories of the folk songs dedicated to local traditions and even neighboring mountains. The dinner conversation after the performance revolved around various topics like music championships, folk traditions in Jolster, and the rise of the micro-brewery and craft beer movement in Norway!


Floyen Restaurant, Bergen Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Floyen Restaurant, Bergen Photo by Madanmohan Rao


A visit to nearby village Hyllestad revealed a museum preserving the ancient millstone manufacturing tradition of the region. We also visited the charming hillside Amot resort, dedicated to boutique performances of folk and opera.

Other site visits took us to the campus of United World College and its humanistic view of education, as well as the home of legendary Norwegian painter Nikolai Astrup. The home and museum were located right next to a stunning fjord, which was the source of inspiration for many of Astrup’s works.


Nikolai Astrup Museum - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Nikolai Astrup Museum – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Day One

The opening ceremony of the Festival set the stage for the next four days of programming: a dedication to the human rights and cultural traditions of refugees. Human rights lawyer Lavleen Kaur spoke evocatively of the plight of displaced refugees, drawing on examples such as the India-Pakistan partition of 1947.


Lavleen Kaur - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Lavleen Kaur – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Singers from Sri Lanka, Norway and Ethiopia performed together in a chorus, and brief vignettes featured bands from Eritrea, Syria, Colombia and Hungary (more on them later in this article). Swift stage changes, flawless acoustics, and colourful digital art marked the slick transitions between bands.

Singer-songwriter Faytinga delivered a haunting set of music from Eritrea, reflecting her years in the East African country’s liberation struggle since she was 14 years of age. Faytinga is from the Kunama ethnic group. She also plays the krar, a small lyre, and has released the album Numey. The band members included Khalid Kouhen (percussion, including ghatam), Federico Umberto (krar, bass) and Jonas Knutsson (saxophone).


Faytinga - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Faytinga – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The night performances shifted to the charming Jolster Museum, a collection of home cabins on a hillside, the perfect setting for intimate acoustic performances. Featured artistes included Varttina Trio (Finland), Gunnar Stubseid and Ale Moller (Norway/Sweden), Radik Tyulyush (Tuva), Viguela (Spain) and the Talent Project showcases from Norway, Kenya and Malawi.

The dancers from Kenya and Malawi showcased traditional percussion instruments and farmland songs. Viguela played the joyous dance music of the Castilla-La Mancha region, led by Helena Pérez on vocals and Juan Antonio Torres on guitar.


Viguela - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Viguela – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Day Two

Music from Asia was showcased by Indonesian gamelan ensemble Samba Sunda. Vocalist Nani Sukmawati and dancer Uum Sumiati were accompanied by instrumentalists from Bandung.

One of the most creative performances was titled Arctic Ice Music, featuring ice instrumentalist and percussionist Terje Isungset from Norway. In a unique collaboration with indigenous vocalists from Canada and Russia as well as Norwegian singer Maria Skranes, Terje played a range of instruments made from ice – including a horn, marimba and a percussion table with ice crystals. This was also a call to harmony with nature and awareness about global warming – hopefully we will never see the day when the ice caps disappear.


Arctic Ice Music - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Arctic Ice Music – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Pioneering group Nishtiman (‘homeland’) showcased the music, language and culture of the Kurdish people, with a mix of haunting Sufi melodies and rousing dance tunes which drew the audience to their feet. The Kurdish people are spread across Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria, and the instruments and performances reflected this diversity, thanks to Hussein Zahawy (daf, darbuka), Sohrab Pouznazeri (vocals, kamanche, tanbur), Sara Eghlimi (vocals), Robin Vassy (percussion), Goran Kamil (ud) and Ertan Tekin (zorna, balaban, duduk).


Nisthiman - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Nisthiman – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Mor Karbasi played music in the Sephardic-Jewish tradition from Spain, and sang in the Ladino language. Her family roots are in Morocco and Iran as well, and the high-energy set of music and dance blended flamenco, fado and Arab rhythms.


Mor Karbasi - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Mor Karbasi – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The evening ended with superb live performances by gypsy brass band Malhala Rai Banda from Romania and Romengo from Hungary. Alcohol flowed copiously from the hotel bar (even at stiff Norwegian prices), and the bands engaged the audience in loud call-and-response sessions. Romengo’s Mónika Lakatos (vocals) and percussionists János Lakatos (milk can) and Tibor Balogh (on something which looked like an inverted kitchen sink) really stood out in the last performance!

Day Three

Day Three again offered a treat for folk music fans, with successive performances on two stages. Erlend Apneseth of Nattsongar showcased the versatility of the Hardanger fiddle, while Erik Rydvall played the Swedish nyckelharpa. Two trios also teamed up in a splendid collaborative effort: Gjermund Larsen Trio & Nordic, from Norway and Sweden respectively.


Nattsongar - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Nattsongar – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Another unique band performing at the festival was the quartet Huun-Huur-Tu from Russia’s Tuva region in Siberia; they wowed the audience with their folk stories, multi-tonal throat singing (by Radik Tyulyush) and traditional instruments such as igil, doshpuluur, byzaanchi, khomuz, amarga, marinhuur and tungur.


Huun-Huur-Tu - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Huun-Huur-Tu – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


A highlight of the day was Broukar (‘brocade’), which was founded in 2007 in Damascus to preserve and revive the musical heritage of Syria. Highlights included three performances of the hypnotic Whirling Dervish dance by Ahmad Alkhatib, along with Sufi vocals by Bayan Rida. I look forward to seeing the performances again at the Rainforest World Music Festival in Malaysia next month, where the band will be making another appearance.


Broukar - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Broukar – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Day Three of the stage performances ended with a slickly choreographed gala featuring brief vignettes from another set of bands from Denmark/Sweden, Haiti, Brazil, Norway, and Canada (more on those later). The Norwegian compères interspersed the acts with humor and wit.

The celebrations continued in the festival hotel with performances from Haiti, Colombia and Eritrea. Haitian ensemble Chouk Bwa Libète blew the audience away with poly-rhythmic drumming and trance-inducing chants in a fine voodoo style called mizik rasin. Front man and composer Sambaton kept the band tightly coordinated, and he led the band in a dance line right into the audience at the end.


Chouk Bwa Libète - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Chouk Bwa Libète – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Noency Mosquera Martinez and her quartet played native folklore from Colombia, such as rondas, arrullos, alabaos and gualí. She was then followed by Eritrea’s Faytinga, while other folk musicians played on the floor below. But that was not the end – an open-ended jam featuring dozens of musicians from the various bands continued in the hotel’s library till 3 am and way beyond!


Noency Mosquera Martinez - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Noency Mosquera Martinez – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Day Four

Day Four kicked off with a remarkable feature: a rendering of lullabies from around the world by refugee mothers settled in Norway. This was also perhaps a haunting call for the right to peace for babies around the world, particularly in war-torn areas.

The Forde Arts Museum played host to an intricate and energetic set by Trio Madeira Brazil. They blended choro, folk and classical music, and the three artistes received rousing applause for an encore: Ronaldo do Bandolim on mandolin, Marcello Gonçalves on seven-string guitar and Zé Paulo Becker on acoustic guitar.


Trio Madeira Brazil - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Trio Madeira Brazil – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The main-stage performances ended with a rousing set by La Bottine Souriante from Canada, who trace their roots all the way back to 1976 in Quebec. Playing French North American roots music amplified by a brass section and floor-board tap-dancers, the group had the audience on their feet for a line dance; they also poked fun at the French and English languages in equal measure!


La Bottine Souriante - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
La Bottine Souriante – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Buses then took the attendees to a hillside barn for a terrific acoustic set by youthful Danish-Swedish trio Dreamers’ Circus. They pushed acoustic collaboration to new dimensions, while also playing unusual instruments like the traskofiol or clog fiddle from Skane in Sweden. Their tracks like ‘Fragments of Solbyn’ drew loud applause, and their camaraderie and talent will ensure a long successful musical career.


Dreamers' Circus - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Dreamers’ Circus – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The festival ended in the hotel with football fans watching France lose to Portugal in the EuroCup finals. Three spontaneous music and dance jams then broke out in the bar area, even though many had early morning flights to catch in just a few hours!

Festival creativity

Other creative features of the Forde Festival which stood out were the jugglers and stilt-walkers of Rajasthan’s troupe Circus Raj; some of the unusual instruments on stage (eg. goat horns, milk cans, bicycle wheel percussion); and the superb designs of the festival logo and symbols (butterflies, reflecting refugees’ flight as well as fragility). Other art work featured the human heart as a bagpipe, a banana as a lyre, and a pear as a violin!


Circus Raj - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
Circus Raj – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Some of the performers also took part in ‘Meet the Artist’ interviews – 20-minute chats hosted by media veterans Simon Broughton (Songlines magazine) and Dore Stein (Tangents Radio). “I didn’t pick my theme, my theme picked me,” explained Ladino singer-composer Mor Karbasi during her interview.


 Music - Heart of Art - Photo by Madanmohan Rao

Music – Heart of Art – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Sadly, music for children during war is only bombs and rockets,” lamented Taoufik Mirkhan, kanun player of Syrian band Broukar. “The heritage of Syria is the heritage of the world – alphabet, music sheets and more,” he added. His fellow artiste Ahmad Alkhatib, explained that dervish dance is a way of saying thanks to God for life.

In the coming articles, I will feature more in-depth interviews with the artistes, along with reviews of their albums. Some of the CDs I picked up at the festival include Spring du Fela, Boreas, Temperamento, Arrivals, Second Movement, Ao Vivo Em Copacabana, Appellation and El Bango de Bojaya.


Forde artist CDs
Forde artist CDs


In sum, this year’s music in Forde focused on the cultural richness and complexities of countries otherwise associated with war and poverty, according to festival director Hilde Bjørkum.

What really stood out again in the 2016 edition are the high quality acts, rich local musical traditions, flawless execution, creative programming, stunning scenery, Norway’s international efforts in music partnerships, egalitarian society, volunteer support, and superb hospitality.

A thousand thanks, Norway – Tussen Tak!

More about the festival at


World Music Showcase from Montreal International Jazz Festival 2016!

The Montreal International Jazz Festival, now in its 37th edition, is regarded as the world’s largest jazz festival. The music lineup includes ambassadors of jazz and blues – as well as a generous dose of artistes in world music and fusion. See my write-up from last year’s edition here; fans of jazz and world music can check out my app ‘Oktav’ as well, a collection of witty quotes about music (available on Apple iTunes and Android).

The 2016 edition of MIJF featured artistes from Canada, USA, Japan, Norway, Turkey, Mexico, Senegal, Mauritania, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti and Guadeloupe. The festival organizers estimate that the acts drew two million attendees, spread over 10 days and two dozen venues. The long summer days of late June and early July made for perfect outdoor performances, along with ticketed indoor events as well.

Check out some of the highlights in this photo tour of MIJF 2016, and make sure you attend the 2017 edition!

Daby Toure
Daby Toure – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Paris-based Mauritanian singer-songwriter Daby Toure kicked off Day One of MIJF 2016. He delivered a pleasing set of ‘Afropean’ music, featuring tracks from five of his albums, and occasionally drummed on his guitar as well. He has earlier founded the group Touré Touré, and sings in Fulani, Soninke and Wolof.


Mashrou Leila
Mashrou Leila – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Formed in Beirut, Arabic alt-rock group Mashrou’ Leila played to a packed concert hall with their blend of indie rock, ballads and electronica. Their music has addressed topics such as politics, social taboos and religion in the Middle East.


Ceu – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Ceu – Maria do Céu Whitaker Poças – was born into a distinguished Brazilian musical family, and began her career at the age of 15. Her indoor set at MIJF drew fans from across North America, and she performed a mix of Brazilian popular music, samba, reggae and electronica. Her albums include Vagarosa and Ao Vivo.


Denis Chang
Denis Chang – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Guitarist Denis Chang draws on gypsy jazz influences such as Django Reinhardt, and has studied with Fapy Lafertin, Ritary Gaguenetti and Emmanuel Kassimo. He performs across Europe and the US, and has released a series of educational DVDs. He performed two sets at MIJF 2016 in an intimate indoor café.


Cuban Martinez Band
Cuban Martinez Band – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


The Cuban Martinez Band had the crowd on their feet with an infectious set of salsa, merengue, bachata and more. Anchored by Yordan Martinez, the band performed in an astonishing venue at the back of a church near the jazz district!


Orchestre Tropicana D’Haiti
Orchestre Tropicana D’Haiti – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


A Haitian institution since 1963, the Orchestre Tropicana d’Haïti is a legendary big band on a 50-year mission to showcase and enhance Haitian culture. Their recent release is Bravo Tropic, and the band had the audience on their feet for a set of sensuous hip-swaying dance.


Samito – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Samito is a singer-songwriter from Montreal, whose music blends acoustica and electronica. The lyrics and style are reflective of his upbringing in Maputo. Samito sang in Portuguese, French, English and Xitswa, offering a textured set of commentary on the changing times.


Lila Downs
Lila Downs – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Born in Mexico and raised in California, award-winning singer-songwriter Lila Downs performed a sold-out standing-room only set reflecting her deep studies of musicology as well as stage charisma. Cumbia, jazz, ballads and stunning visual animation set the tone for commentary on women’s rights, immigration and poverty in Mexico. Her albums include Pecados y Milagros and Balas y Chocolate.


Baba Zula
Baba Zula – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


One of the extraordinary bands at MIJF 2016 was Baba Zula, with a mix of Turkish dub and psychedelia. Traditional Turkish instruments, wild costumes and theatrical delivery regaled the audience and provided them with a sense of Istanbul’s underground cult movement.


Mariachi Flor de Toloache
Mariachi Flor de Toloache – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Mariachi Flor de Toloache, named for the legendary Toloache flower of Mexico, is an all-female mariachi band. They were nominated for the Latin Grammy in 2015. Their original costumes and ambience blended with modern takes on classic and contemporary tunes, and had the audience clapping and chanting along loudly during their two outdoor sets.


Malika Tirolien
Malika Tirolien – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Singer-songwriter Malika Tirolien from Guadeloupe performed a superb outdoor set. She had the audience on their feet for a smooth mix of Afro-Caribbean jazz and urban beat.


Ilam – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Young Senegalese singer-composer Ilam has already won a range of awards in Canada, and receives wide radio airplay. His spicy outdoor set of reggae, blues, Afro-folk, pop and rock kept the audience dancing even during a slight shower; concert-goers were rewarded with a beautiful rainbow afterwards.


Makaya – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


Pianist David Bontemps heads Montreal-based Afro-Caribbean jazz band Makaya. Formed in 2006, the quintet includes percussionist Cydric Féréol, guitarist and singer Jude Deslouches, bassist Nicolas Bédard and congas player Emmanuel Delly. Caribbean rhythms blended with jazz and Creole during their MIJF set; the band has also performed at Montréal’s Creole Festival and released their first album in 2009.


AfroDizz - Photo by Madanmohan Rao
AfroDizz – Photo by Madanmohan Rao


AfroDizz was one of the most sensational bands at MIJF 2016. This Montreal group is anchored by jazz guitarist Gabriel Aldama, who is deeply influenced by Nigerian Afrobeat maestro Fela Kuti. The eight musicians delivered a superb set of Afrobeat, jazz and funk. Their albums include Kif Kif, Froots (2006) and Sounds from Outer Space.

More about the festival at


Cuatro Mastery and Hip Shaking Cumbia at EXIB 2016 Day 3 Showcases

Inberoamerican Music Expo (EXIB) organizers were forced to move the outdoor showcase venues to the historic Teatro Garcia de Resende. The beautiful renovated theater turned out to be an excellent space to experience the live performances.

The first act on stage was La Colectiva Corazón, a multinational group of graduates from the Berklee College of Music – Valencia, Spain Campus. The collective plays what they describe as cumbia fusion. Bear in mind that it’s Chilean cumbia along with guajiras, boleros, funk, Andean music, and pop. Think of Chico Trujillo mixed with Manu Chao.

The slow dance beat immediately got members of the audience dancing (primarily women). The band brought a dance party atmosphere to Teatro Garcia de Resende and the performance was very well received.

La Colectiva Corazon was created by Chilean composer, vocalist and percussionist Gonzalo Eyzaguirre. The ensemble includes musicians from Puerto Rico, Slovenia, Ecuador, Colombia, Italy and the United States. La Colectiva just released its debut album titled “Viajero.”

The band included Gonzalo Eyzaguirre on vocals, charango and percussion; Travis Smilen on electric guitar; Sebastián Laverde on congas; Carlos Llido on drums and timbales; Eric Benavent on saxophone; Alfonso Benavent on trumpet; and Javier Giner Garrido on bass.

Luiz Caracol - Courtesy of EXIB Música
Luiz Caracol – Photo courtesy of EXIB Música

The second act was Portuguese singer-songwriter and guitarist Luiz Caracol. He’s a talented artist who combines the rhythms of Portugal with jazz and the music of African countries, Brazil and the sounds of Jorge Drexler.

Luiz Caracol has a captivating laid back song style supported by his rhythmic electric guitar and a fabulous rhythm section that includes a percussionist from Brazil and a West African drummer.

Caracol was born in Elvas right after his parents arrived from newly independent Angola, where they had lived before the African nation became independent. Luiz Caracol released his first album, Devagar, in 2013. Devagar includes special guest performances by Fernanda Abreu, Sara Tavares and Valete. He’s currently recording his new album titled Metade, scheduled for release later this year, in 2016.

Concert lineup: Luiz Caracol on guitar and vocals; Chico Santos on bass; Miroca Paris on drums; and Ruca Rebordão on percussion.

Zaira Franco - Photo courtesy of EXIB Música
Zaira Franco – Photo courtesy of EXIB Música

Mexico was represented by vocalist Zaira Franco. Zaira’s show crossed numerous musical boundaries. She was accompanied by a rock band and delivered a mix of Mexican music, boleros, funk, Afro Cuban sounds and rock. The band’s electric guitar player was impressive, releasing fiery solos using various types of techniques. At one time, Zaira’s band went into full blown progressive rock. Zaira Franco presented her latest album, Tumbalá.

Showcase lineup: Zaira Franco on vocals; Mario Patrón on piano; Federico Erik Negrete on bass; Alfredo Martínez on guitar; Fausto Aguilar on drums; and Luis Manuel García on percussion.

C4 Trio - Photo courtesy of EXIB Música
C4 Trio – Photo courtesy of EXIB Música

The fourth act was truly spectacular. Undoubtedly, the highlight of the entire event. C4 Trio is an award-winning ensemble of three Venezuelan cuatro players along with a bassist.

C4 Trio are highly skilled musicians who demonstrated virtuosity, creativity and delivered a captivating and fun show featuring ensemble pieces, solos and interplay. The repertoire included Venezuelan folk songs as well as pop standards played at dazzling speeds. The group received repeated standing ovations and was the only act that came back for an encore.

The C4 Trío lineup included Jorge Glem on cuatro; Héctor Molina on cuatro; Edward Ramírez on cuatro; and Gustavo Márquez on bass.

Dona Jandira - Photo courtesy of EXIB Música
Dona Jandira – Photo courtesy of EXIB Música

The closing act was 78 year old Brazilian vocalist and guitarist Dona Jandira. The charismatic performer started her career in 2004 after she met producer José Dias.

Lineup: Dona Jandira on vocals and guitar; José Dias Guimaraes de Almeida on bass and Eugenio de Castro Ribeiro on violin.

Headline photo: La Colectiva Corazón, courtesy of EXIB Música

Related articles:

The Passionate Music of Alentejo, the Focus of EXIB 2016 Opening Concert

Three Continents Represented at EXIB 2016 Day 1 Showcases

The Diverse Sounds of Iberia, Mexico and Cuba at EXIB 2016 Day 2 Showcases

Related links:
La Colectiva Corazón
Luiz Caracol
Zaira Franco
C4 Trio
Dona Jandira
EXIB Música


The Diverse Sounds of Iberia and Cuba at EXIB 2016 Day 2 Showcases

The EXIB 2016 opening act on May 6th was captivating Spanish vocalist and composer Lara Bello. Although she’s originally from Granada, Lara Bello is currently based in New York City. Lara’s concert at Praça do Giraldo in the Evora town center was one of the highlights of the day, delivering an entrancing mix of sounds of the Mediterranean: flamenco, North African, jazz and Latin America.


Lara Bello at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Lara Bello at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Lara Bello uses flamenco and jazz vocal stylings and was accompanied by two superb Spanish instrumentalists, guitarist David Minguillón and percussionist David Gadea.
Lara Bello’s discography includes Niña Pez (2009) and Primero Amarillo Después Malva (2012).


Jaqueline at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Jaqueline at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


The second act, award-winning fado singer Jaqueline was one of the most popular acts that night. Her charismatic presence on stage and her passionate, powerful voice drew in a large crowd. Although we’ve been given an image of the melancholic fado singer, there was no melancholy there. Jaqueline delivered well-known songs that Portuguese members of the audience were very familiar with, and they sang along.


Praça do Giraldo audience at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Praça do Giraldo audience at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Jaqueline was accompanied by three virtuoso musicians, who got an opportunity to showcase their talent with an instrumental piece. The lineup included Paulo Ferreira on guitarra portuguesa (Portuguese guitar), Jerónimo Mendes on Viola de Fado (fado guitar) and Miguel Silva on bass guitar.


Paulo Ferreira on Portuguese guitar at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Paulo Ferreira on Portuguese guitar at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Jerónimo Mendes on fado guitar at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Jerónimo Mendes on fado guitar at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Jaqueline Carvalho was born in Lisbon in a family of musicians and singers from Madeira and Lisbon. She was a member of “As Miudas Mem Martins”, a group of Portuguese fado artists who performed throughout Portugal and abroad. In 2009 Jaqueline released her first album, titled “Fado”.


Mel Semé at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Mel Semé at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Cuban multi-instrumentalist Mel Semé was the third act on stage. He was joined by guest vocalist and guitarist Iraqis del Valle. The concert showcased Mel Semé’s acoustic side featuring Cuban-rooted jazz and pop songs.

Born in Camagüey, Cuba, Mel Semé began his music career playing with the older musicians who performed a type of Latin gospel music. After graduating from Havana University of music and forming part of the Havana Symphony Orchestra and the Camagüey Symphony Orchestra he lived for a while in Switzerland where he taught courses in percussion and performance. He is currently based in Spain and is the leader of the reggae and funk group, Black Gandhi. Mel Semé latest album is “Naturaleza”.


Projeto Alma - Photo courtesy of EXIB 2016
Projeto Alma – Photo courtesy of EXIB 2016


The fourth official showcase act was Portuguese world music band Projeto Alma. The ensemble crosses various musical and geographical boundaries, featuring genres from the Iberian Peninsula such as fado from Portugal and flamenco tango from Spain as well as Afro-Brazilian bossa nova, Latin American boleros, Cape Verdean morna and Argentine tango.

“O Outro lado da Rua” (the other side of the street) is the band’s first album.

Projeto Alma’s members include Teresa Macedo on vocals; Júlio Vilela on guitar; Zeca Neves on bass; Vitor Apolo on accordion; and João Abreu on percussion.


La Corrala at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
La Corrala at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


The last act on stage was La Corrala from Granada, Spain. The group features musicians from various parts of Spain who are based in Granada and come from the reggae and mestizo music scene. Granada has become a really attractive and affordable location for musicians from Spain and abroad (sort of like Asheville in the USA). La Corrala plays flamenco combined with Latin music and reggae beats, jazz, Argentine tango, blues, bossa nova and pop featuring original lyrics by the band’s vocalist. They were one of the highlights of the night.

La Corrala has released an EP with studio and live tracks. Band members include Manuel Jesús Afanador Herrera on vocals; Juan María García Navia on piano, flute and background vocals; Eduardo Tomás del Ciotto on electric bass; Jesús Santiago Rubia on percussion; Juan Peralta Torrecilla on trumpet, flugelhorn and background vocals; and Rubens García Real on guitar.

Related articles:

The Passionate Music of Alentejo, the Focus of EXIB 2016 Opening Concert

Three Continents Represented at EXIB 2016 Day 1 Showcases

Related links:

Lara Bello
Mel Semé
Projeto Alma
La Corrala

Headline photo: Lara Bello, David Minguillón and David Gadea at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Three Continents Represented at EXIB 2016 Day 1 Showcases

The threat of rain forced organizers to move the EXIB 2016 showcase stage from the Roman Temple of Évora (Templo de Diana) to Praça do Giraldo in downtown Evora. The first artist to appear on stage was Chilean singer-songwriter Nano Stern. Armed with just a guitar and his vocals, he put on a lively show. Nano is deeply influenced by the Nueva Canción Chilena, especially artists like Victor Jara and Inti Illimani.

As I am gradually able to create powerful vibrations, other people can feel the effect that this has; if it is intense, then everything vibrates around it,” says Nano about his work. His discography includes Live in Concert; Las Torres de Sal; Los Espejos; Nano Stern; Mil 500 Vueltas; and Voy y Vuelvo.

Nano’s lyrics are charged with political and anti-establishment messages. Unlike other singer-songwriters in the past, he strums and plays some solos on his acoustic guitar wildly, looking more like a rocker than a folk singer. His one-man show was highly entertaining.


Mariola Membrives at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Mariola Membrives at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


The next artist scheduled to perform was Ecuadorian singer Mariela Condo. Unfortunately, she wasn’t able to make it due to the devastating earthquake in Ecuador. Mariela was replaced by Spanish vocalist, dancer and educator Mariola Membrives.


 Mariola Membrives and Masa Kamaguchi at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero

Mariola Membrives and Masa Kamaguchi at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Membrives performed part of her “La Llorona” show. It’s a mix of flamenco, Latin American influences and jazz. She appeared before the live audience accompanied by bassist Masa Kamaguchi. While Membrives sang with a mixture of flamenco and jazz vocal techniques, Masa Kamaguchi performed serpentine jazz bass lines. It was an unexpected mix that felt like two simultaneous performances on stage, but it worked.


Duarte at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Duarte at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


The third act, Duarte, brought the passion and charisma of fado to downtown Evora. Duarte started the show saying “Welcome to my square, welcome to our square. It’s good to be back home after so many travels.” Duarte is a native of Evora and has a fado and pop and rock background. He researched traditional Fado lyrics and music and has composed his own songs that form part of his repertoire. In 2006 the Amalia Rodrigues Foundation awarded him the Emerging Male Fado Singer prize.

The audience loved Duarte’s captivating performance. He was accompanied by two outstanding instrumentalists, Pedro Amendoeira on guitarra portuguesa (Portuguese guitar) and Rogério Ferreira on viola de fado (fado guitar).


Pedro Amendoeira at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero
Pedro Amendoeira at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


 Rogério Ferreira at EXIB 2016 - Photo by Angel Romero

Rogério Ferreira at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Duarte has released three albums “Fados Meus” (2004), “Aquelas Coisas da Gente” (2009) and “Sem dor nem piedade” (2015).


Karyna Gomes with Ivan Gomes - Photo by Angel Romero
Karyna Gomes with Ivan Gomes – Photo by Angel Romero


Vocalist and percussionist Karyna Gomes brought the sounds of Guinea Bissau to EXIB 2016. Karyna grew up in Guinea Bissau and was a member of the iconic Super Mama Djombo. She currently lives in Portugal.

During her show, Karyna introduced the gourd water drum played only by women and despite having a drummer, Karyna delivered a set of laid back songs.


gourd water drum - Photo by Angel Romero
gourd water drum – Photo by Angel Romero


Karyna Gomes recently recorded her first solo album, titled “Mindjer“, produced by Paulo Borges. “Mindjer” is a tribute to the strength, determination and courage of the women of Guinea Bissau.

Karyna Gomes’ band included Jose Afonso on keyboards; Hugo Aly on bass; Nir Paris on drums; Ivan Gomes on guitar; and Ibrahima Galissa on kora.


Kalakan at EXIB 2016 - Photo courtesy of EXIB Música
Kalakan at EXIB 2016 – Photo courtesy of EXIB Música


Northern Basque band Kalakan put on a popular show, using drums, the alboka animal horn (hornpipe), the chalaparta percussion instrument and Basque traditional vocals. The trio sings in Basque and their dynamic show was well-liked by the audience.

Kalakan has a new album titled Elementuak that features instrumental and a cappella pieces, combining traditional sounds with newly composed material.

Band members include Thierry Biscary on vocals and percussion; Jamixel Bereau on vocals and percussion; and Xan Errotabehere on vocals, alboka, flute and percussion.

related articles:

The Passionate Music of Alentejo, the Focus of EXIB 2016 Opening Concert

related links:

Nano Stern
Mariola Membrives

Headline photo: Nano Stern at EXIB 2016 – Photo by Angel Romero


Artist Profile: João Afonso

João Afonso at EXIB 2016 in Evora - Photo by Angel Romero
João Afonso at EXIB 2016 in Evora – Photo by Angel Romero

João Afonso was born in Maputo (Mozambique) on July 8, 1965, where he picked grew up listening to African urban music as well as traditional Portuguese music through his uncle, Portuguese singer Zeca Afonso.

In 1978, João moved to Portugal. In December 1994 he participated in the Maio maduro maio project along with José Mário Branco and Amélia Muge, presented in Lisbon and other cities abroad. The Maio Maduro Maio double CD was released in 1995.

João Afonso also participated in the “Janelas Verdes” and “Acoustic” albums by world music multi-instrumentalist and composer Júlio Pereira.

In 1996 João Afonso performed several concerts in Spain with singer-songwriter Luis Pastor, in which they sang each others’ songs as well as material by Zeca Afonso. They were occasionally joined by Pedro Guerra.

Missangas was João Afonso’s first solo album, released in May 1997 in Portugal; subsequently released in France through Verve / Polygram and Spain (Resistencia, 1998). In December 1997 he participated in the Voz e guitarra (voice and guitar) album and show produced by Expo 1998 in Lisbon.


João Afonso - Missangas
João Afonso – Missangas


In 1998 João Afonso participated in the collective production Novas vos trago with two songs from the historical songbook. That same year, he composed the music for the poem Paz de Santiago recorded by Spanish Singer-songwriter Luis Pastor in his album Por el mar de mi mano. And João also recorded the song Na machamba (from his album Missangas) with Canary Islander group Mestisay.

In 1999 he was a guest vocalist in the song Aquí em baixo (Azul) that appeared in the album by Spanish singer Uxía. Also, in 1999, João released his second solo album, Barco voador, that reflected his experiences traveling throughout different continents. Universal Music released the album in Spain. Zanzibar, his third solo recording, came in 2002.



The 2006 solo album Outra vida confirmed that João Afonso is one of the finest performers and songwriters of his generation in Portugal. In November 2006 João Afonso participated as a guest in the book/CD by Luis Pastor titled Nesta esquina do tempo (In this corner of time) with Jose Saramago poems set to music.


João Afonso - Outra vida
João Afonso – Outra vida


In 2014 he released “Sangue Bom” where he composed music for poems by Mia Couto and José Eduardo Agualusa.


Maio Maduro Maio, with José Mário Branco and Amélia Muge (Sony Portugal, 1995).
Missangas (Universal Music Portugal, 1997)
Barco Voador (Universal Music Portugal, 1999)
Zanzibar (Universal Music Portugal, 2002)
A arte e a música (Universal Music Portugal, 2004), compilation
Outra vida (Universal Music Portugal, 2006)
Um redondo vocábulo (2010)
Sangue Bom (2014).