All About Dub

 Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae
Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae

A new genre called Dub was created in Jamaica in the 1970s when recording engineers “deconstructed” popular songs. Dub is in reality the art of remixing, something which became popular a decade later and has been a common practice in the recording industry since then.

On Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae Michael Veal sets the context for the Dub revolution by explaining the roots of modern Jamaican music, from mento, through ska and finally Reggae. There is also fascinating information about early recording studios in Jamaica and the role of DJs and producers.

Studio One gets special attention and it’s no wonder as it played a crucial role in the development of one of the most popular forms of roots music in the world.  Some of reggae’s biggest figures made their first recordings at legendary studio. But Studio Onbe was not the only player in town and many other pioneering studios get extensive coverage in the book.

Dub exploded in the mid to late 1970s ad has influenced numerous artists in North America and Europe, including many trend setting global electronica acts.

The author, an ethnomusicologist, combines absorbing details with scholarly work, providing extensive research. Michael Veal is an associate professor of ethnomusicology at Yale University, where he specializes in the music of Africa and the African diaspora. He is the author of Fela: The Life and Times of an African Musical Icon and also a musician and composer.

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